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Full text of "The Buff and Blue (newspaper), Vol. 52, no. 1 (October 23, 1943)"

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Sadie Hawkins Day 
November 6 



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Volume 52, Number 1 



GALLAUDET COLLEGE, KENDALL GREEN, WASHINGTON, D. C 



Saturday, October 23, 1943 



Eventful Summer Spent 
By Faculty Members 



Gas Shortage Prevents 
Extensive Travel 



President Hall says that his 
summer was spent "in sweat and 
tears, but no blood." It is easy 
to understand the sweat and tears 
since Professor Benson and Miss 
Keller were resigning, to say 
nothing of Cupid trying to entice 
Miss Rems'berg away too. But the 
"no blood" part is dubious because 
he also went to a few baseball 
games, which anyone knows are 
perfectly blood-thirsty ordeals. 
However our good-natured pres- 
ident was kept very busy with the 
new rules and regulations inflict- 
ed by the war, and he greatly en- 
joyed corresponding with the lar- 
gest number of new students to be 
admitted here in years. 

Dr. Elizabeth Peet .remained 
here a large part of the summer 
working on the Index to the 
American Annals of the Deaf. 
When her work was finished, she 
spent the balance of the summer 
in Long Island with friends. 

Prof. H. D. Drake drove to his 
beloved farm in Ohio and spent 
the summer there. 

Prof. F. H. Hughes worked on 
his Victory Garden this summer, 
besides taking a few short trips to 
the Pennsylvania mountains with 
the "Mrs." 

Prof. I. S. Fusfeld tells us that he 
cleared away so much accumula- 
ted paper work that, he became 
part and parcel of his desk. He 
also took this time to finish trans- 
ferring the editorship of the 
American Annals of the Deaf to 
Dr. Ignatius Bjorlee, Superinten- 
dent of the Maryland School for 
Deaf, and a graduate of the Nor- 
mal Class of 1910. Dr. Bjorlee is 
assuming the editorship pending 
choice of a permanent editor. 
Then he enjoyed a one-day vaca- 
tion visiting the New Jersey 
School for the Deaf and another 
day visiting his son in camp at 
Fort Bragg, N- C. 

Prof. W. J. Krug had a very 
full summer here at home. His 
twin sons became severely ill with 
whooping cough which kept him 
constantly on the jump. Besides 
getting much experience as a 
"nurse," he also tried his hand at 
farming, being successful enough 
to win prizes for his garden which 
was indeed a victory. His string- 
beans and onions won second 
place, while his beets took first 
along with $5.00. He won sec- 
ond prize for the best garden in 
North-east D. C, and first for this 
defense area, wining ten dollars 
for each. Congrats Professor 
Krug! 

Prof. P. Hall, Jr., was busy 
enough making repairs around 
the college without everything 
happening to him. His daughter 
fell from her hicycle and re- 
ceived a concussion of the head, 
whereupon his maid went into 
hysterics. Hall, Jr., himself had 
to drop a heavy iron bar on his 
foot, the effects of which he did 
not feel until the next day. He 



Preps Oriented 
In Busy Week 

In answer to Gallaudet's call, 
a lively crowd of some fifty-one 
"Preps" began arriving at the 
campus at different intervals on 
Tuesday, Septmber 21st. Later the 
class was increased to 54 by the 
appearance of three more students 
who had come back after leaves 
of absence. Notwithstanding the 
wartime exigencies, this class is 
the largest the college has wel- 
comed in several years. 

The new students began their 
first years' sojourn at Gallaudet 
by preparing their rooms and mak- 
ing the various deposits required. 
Their first actual glimpse of what 
lay in store for them came that 
afternoon. The boys and girls met 
with their respective deans, who 
explained the college rules and 
miscellaneous other things. Fol- 
lowing the evening meal, the 
"Preps" were shown a two-reel 
movie of Gallaudet College, com- 
paring the old and the new. 

Wednesday, September 22nd, 
was indeed a very busy day for 
the class of '48. Their various 
activities consisted of lectures by 
Professor Doctor and Dean Fus- 
feld, a tour of the campus,' & 
physical examination, and a meet- 
ing with the Head Seniors. 

Things were comparatively 
quiet on Thursday. The Washing- 
ton transportation system was ex- 
plained and discussed by the 
Head Seniors, and Dean Peet ex- 
plained the mode of social life at 
college. Part of the evening was 
spent viewing a short movie. 

Friday morning, September 
2 4th, the entire "Prep" class took 
the Stanford and the California 
Personality test. Also on the list of 
activities for the day was a lec- 
ture by Dean Krug, entitled "Why 
Keep Fit?" 

The climax to the "Prep Week" 
came at a formal "Get-acquainted'' 
party held in Chapel Hall on Sat- 
urday evening, September 25th. 
V 

Fusfeld Gives 
Standard Tests 



(See Faculjty Summer page 3) 
V 

O.W.LS. Start 
Another Year 



On a night when the moon had 
reached its zenith, and the Issue 
was at hand, in the all-encompass- 
ing presence of the Sacred Owl of 
Hindustan, it was decreed that the 
following should consecrate them- 
selves to faithful service in the 
mystic order of the O.W.L.S.: 

President, Caroline Tillinghast, 
'44; vice-president, Agnes Carr, 
'45; secretary, Jean Smith, '46; 
treasurer, Marjorie C. Case, '46; 
and librarian, Frances Lupo, '44. 



During its first week on Ken- 
dall Green, the "Prep" class was 
given a set of standardized exam- 
inations in Chapel Hall. These ex- 
aminations, the Stanford Achieve- 
ment Tests and the California 
Personality Test, are the 3ame 
as had been given to all new stu- 
dents of the College over a period 
of years. 

Although the results of these 
examinations have no effect on 
the students' records here in 
college, these tests serve several 
purposes. In the first place, they 
offer an opportunity for the Fa- 
culty to judge the relative stand- 
ing among the new students. Sec- 
ondly, the itiests are a part of the 
college research program. By 
comparing the results of these 
examinations, the college re- 
search department is able to de- 
termine whether the new students 
are being properly prepared for 
a college education. They Jalso 
show in which subjects the various 
students need strengthening. 
These examinations also provide 
an important index of what each 
student has individually attained 
in. his school achievement up to 
this point. Thus, in the space of 
one examination, important in- 
formation about each new stu- 
dent and his possibilities is ob- 
tained, enabling the faculty to 
gain a fuller understanding of 
the needs of each new student. 



Cupid Scores 
Another Hit 



Fusfeld Resigns as 
Editor of Annals 



Mrs. Temple 
Resumes Duties 



Bjorlee Acting as 
Temporary Editor 



Enrollment High in Spite 
of Pressing Times 



Miss Ruth Remsberg, of the 
Gallaudet teaching staff, and Mr. 
Kenneth Temple, of Niagara 
Falls, N. Y., were united in mar- 
riage on September 4, 1943, in 
the Dutch Reformed Church of 
Middleton, Maryland. Members of 
the Gallaudet faculty who were 
present at the wedding, which 
was an informal affair, were 
Mr. and Mrs. William McClure, 
Mr. and Mrs. Sam B. Craig, and 
Mrs. Troup. 

Following the wedding, the 
couple left for a short trip in the 
New England states, after which 
they took up their residence in 
Washington, D. C. 

Mr. Temple, who resides in 
Washington, L\ C, is employed as 
a research chemist in the Naval 
Research Laboratories at Anta- 
costia, Maryland. Mrs. Temple, 
who is also a resident of the Dis- 
trict, will remain on the Gallau- 
det staff for the duration. 

The student body and the fac- 
ulty wish to extend sincere con- 
gratulations to the happy couple 
and wish them all the luck in the 
world. 

. ' V — 

lops in Class- 
Room Work 



With the appearance of the 
Honor Roll for the third term 
last May, the departing Senior 
Class received one last moment 
of triumph before leaving their 
Alma Mater. The results of the 
third-term exams showed that the 
departing Seniors had ten of their 
number listed on the Honor Roll. 
The Prep Class was second with 
a total of six honor students* 
while the Junior Class followed 
close .behind with five on the/ 
list. Those who earned the dis- 
t'nction of being placed on the 
Honor Roll were as follows: 

Seniors — Alan Adams, Bonnie 
Bodimer, Iva Boggs, Jack Falcon, 
Ruth Gustafson, Francis Huff- 
man,, Donald Kennedy, Elmer 
Long, Nina Van Oss, Edith Wil- 
liamson. 

Juniors — Paul Baldridge, Mel- 
vine Fischer, Bertram Lepen- 
dorf, Frances Lupo, Caroline Til- 
linghast. 

Sophomores — Ruth Benoit, Ag- 
nes Carr, Clarhelen Wilkins. 

Freshmen — Marjorie Case, Mar- 
garet Clack. 

Preparatory Class — Earline 
Becker, Thomas Fishier, Mervin 
Garretson, Keith Lange, Ernest 
Schuster, Estella Wood. 



After having served as editor of 
the American Annals of the Deaf 
lor twenty-three years, Prof. I. 
S. Fusfeld of Gallaudet College 
handed over his duties in Septem- 
br to Dr. Ignatius Bjorlee, Super- 
intendent of the Maryland School. 
Increased responsibilities necessi- 
tated his resignation, and he re- 
grets that he is not able to con- 
tinue his work under this heavy 
burden. 

Prof. Fusfeld served as associ- 
ate editor for one year under Dr. 
Allan Fay, after which he assum- 
ed full responsibility of the mag- 
azne. During his quarter of a 
century of faithful service, Prof. 
Fusfeld strived to help enlighten 
:he educators of the deaf and 
those interested in their welfare 
on the systems, conditions, and 
problems of the American schools 
for the deaf. 

Dr. Ignatius Bjorlee, N-'IO, is 
acting as editor of the Annals 
temporarily, that is, for one year. 
He has contributed in no small 
degree to the welfare of the deaf, 
and on such merit we feel he is 
capable of carrying on the work 
of those editors preceding him. 
The associate editors for the com- 
ing year are Dr. Powrie V. Doc- 
tor and Dr. Elizabeth Peet who 
have served in this capacity for 
some time. 

V 

Pres. of Alumni 
Ass'n Speaks 

Samuel XII, 21, "And turn ye 
not aside: for then should ye go 
after vain things, which cannot 
profit nor deliver for they are 
vain,'' was the topic chosen by 
Reverend Herbert C. Merrill in 
his address to the studentbody in 
Chapel Hall on Sunday evening, 
October 3rd. Rev. Merrill, of the 
class of '9 6, has been a prominent 
missionary among the deaf in all 
parts of the country. He was re- 
cently elected to the office of 
President of the Gallaudet Col- 
lege Alumni Association. 

Rev. Merrill opened his speech 
with a prayer. His lecture was 
mostly concerned with advicing 
the young men and women on 
the necessity of becoming accus- 
stomed to living useful and res- 
ponsible lives. In Rev. Merrill's 
own words, "It is fine to be good 
but it is better to be good for 
something." 

The speaker ended his inspir- 
ing talk with a closing prayer, andt 
then mingled with the audience 
exchanging greetings. 



Times Reflected by 
Changes in Faculty 

There have been a great many 
changes in the faculty this year. 
Two of our instructors were mar- 
ried during the summer and some 
have moved to higher positions 
or to new opportunities leaving 
their places to others. Many of 
those who remained have taken 
on new duties and added respon- 
sibilities. 

Professor Elizabeth Benson, 
former Preparatory Mathematics 
and Normal Manual instructor, 
has joined the Wacs. At present 
she is a First Class Private at 
Camp Olethorpe, Georgia. 

Dr. Eliz .beth Peet now teaches 
Prof. Benson's Normal Class, and 
Junior year French, leaving 
Sophomore yfcar French in the 
hands of Mrs. Lorraine Kline. 

Professor Hall, Jr., Dean Fus- 
feld, and Professor Krug have 
charge of Preparatory Mathema- 
tics. Prof. Krug also teaches 
Freshman Latin this year. 

Former Librarian and Business 
Practice instructor, Miss Laura 
Knight, '4 2, resigned her position 
to become the bride of Ben 
Schowe, Jr., '4 2. Mrs. Lorraine 
Kline, former assistant to Miss 
Knight, now has charge of the 
Library. Misses Julia Burg and 
Frances Todd, both of the Senior 
Class, teach Business Practice and 
assist Mrs. Kline in the Library. 

Miss Adelaide Keller has ac- 
cepted a position in a public 
school, leaving her duties here as 
clothing and art instuctor to Mrs. 
Sam Craig and to Miss Orpha 
Thompson of the Normal Class. 

While we are sorry that our 
former instructors have left, we 
are happy to welcome the new- 
comers, and hope that they will 
find their work here both profit- 
able and enjoyable. 

V 

Kappa Gamma 
Elects Officers 



California Leads in 
State Representation 



Private Wayne rr Tiny" Schleiff 
Returns In Glory 



By Bertt Lependorf 
Uppers returning to college on 
Registration Day, September 24, 
1943, were pleasantly surprised to 
see that Wayne D. Schleiff had 
come back. 

"Tiny," as the six-foot-four 
Arkansas traveler is affectionately 
known, has just been mustered 
out of the United States Army for 
medical reasons (lack of sufficient 
hearing), with close to ten 
months' training behind him. 

After leaving college on Novem- 
her 28th, 1942, Tiny reported to 
the Camp Robert E. Lee induction 
center in nearby Virginia. From 
there, following a fiver-day period 
of receiving issue (G.I.) clothing, 
dunnage and accessories, as well 
as the many and varied inocula- 
tions against almost every known 
disease, Wayne D. Schleiff, official- 
ly listed as Private United States 
Army 33449135 T42 O, was as- 
signed to the 391st Infantry, 98th 



(Indian Head) Division, Camp 
Breckinridge, Kentucky. 

Basic training for the next thir- 
teen weeks included the manual 
of arms, close order drill, gun- 
nery, the daily (six-) dozen and 
the inevitible K.P. Came regular 
assignment in due time to the 
mortar platoon of Company H 
and Private Schleiff worked him- 
self up from ammunition carrier 
to first gunner, in a matter of 
weeks. 

First gunner is the. sighter, 
handling the intricate and delicate 
mechanisms of "anglee of fire." 
In maneuvers he carries the mor- 
tar barrel. His is the position of 
leader, and since the issue rifle 
would interfere with the carrying 
of the mortar, a calibre .45 army 
colt is the only weapon he carried. 

Finally hospitalized upon re- 
commendation of his commanding 



Hail! Vishnu! Hail! 

From out of the craging ca- 
verns, from the uttermost midst 
of the leaping, roaring flames of 
Shivland, wherein dwells be- 
loved Vishnu's favorite few, 
comes greetings Beloved Bre- 
thren. 

Therefore hearken o' ye Bre- 
thren far and near. The Holy 
book of Moraak again passed into 
the darkness of the unknown on 
the 28th day of the ninth moon 
of the 43rd year of beloved Vish- 
nu's reign. 

In the presence of Shiv, the 
faithful keeper of the mother 
shrine, the following Brethren 
were elected to guide the des- 
tinies of the Kappa Gamma Fra- 
ternity for the following year: 

Grand Rajah, Bro. Paul Bald- 
ridge, '44; Kamoos, Bro. Donald 
Padden, '45; Tahdheed, Bro. Leo- 
nard Meyer, '44; Mukhtar, Bro. 
H. Krostoski, '45; Abbah Tekoth, 
Bro. L. Moore, '44; Chartophylax, 
Bro. H. Steinman, '46; Razathe- 
ka, Bro. B. Brightwell, '4 6,; Kede- 
mon, Bro. R. Sperry, '46; Biblio- 
theke, Bro. W. Ayers, '45; Ibn 
Phillikin, Bro. F. Sladek, '46; Ibn 
Ahmad, Bro. W. Furlong, '46; 
Et Tebreeze, Bro. M. Plotitsky, 
'44; Eth Thaaliber, t Bro. E. El- 
kins, '46. 

The following Brethren were 
chosen to head the various com- 
mittees ; 

Initiation — Bro. Grand Rajah, 
chairman, Bro. Meyer, Bro. Kros- 
toski, and Bro. Sladek. 

Probation — Bro. Kamoos, 
chairman, Bro. Meyer, Bro. Ayers, 



(See Schleiff Returns, page 3) (See KAPPA GAMMA, page 3) 



Registration day for prepara- 
tory students at Gallaudet began 
September 21st, and three days 
later the upper classmen return 
to resume their studies. One hun- 
dred and forty students make up 
the total attendance at Gallaudet 
for the current scholastic year. 

Of those attending, fifty-one are 
newcomers— Jforty-nine preparats 
and two new additions . to the 
Freshman class. The new. en- 
rollees came so early as to accus- 
tom themselves to their new en- 
vironment and to take special 
tests as well as to become ac- 
quainted with one another and 
the members of the faculty. 

The normal class this year is 
comparaively small, consider-; 
ing those of previous years, with 
only three students endeavoring 
to obtain a master's degree and to 
become teachers of the deaf. They 
are Irene A. Pelagi, B.S., Mon- 
tana; Orpha A. Thompson, B.S., 
Minnesota; and Cornelius P. 
Geotzinger, B.S., Missouri. 

The state most highly repre- 
sented at college this year is 
California, with ten students. Sec- 
ond place honors are divided bet- 
ween Indiana and New York, each 
with nine. Kentucky is third 
with seven. All in all, the stu- 
dents represent thirty-six states, 
the District of Columbia, and 
Canada. 

The Preparats, thirty boys and 
nineteen girls, are as follows: 
Anna Chapin, Missouri; Ruth De- 
pew, California; Velma Halvorsen 
North Dakota; Pauline Hamlin, 
Kentucky; Margaret Hatch, Dist- 
rict of Columbia; Frances Hatten, 
Minnesota; Irene Hodock, Ohio; 
Helen Huet, Indiana; Mary Hug- 
hart, West Virginia; Gloria Inter- 
mill, So. Dakota; Nelda Kressin, 
Wisconsin; Jean Lucas, Washing- 
ton; Frances Parsons, California; 
Sarah Stiffter, Pennsylvania; Betty 
Taylor, Illinois; Audrey Watson, 
Colorado; Nancy Wharton, West 
Virginia; Abigail Yowell, New 
Jersey; Henry A.hls, Wisconsin; 
George Babinetz, Pennsylvania; 
Carl Barber, Georgia; Walter 
Beck, Canada; Joseph Broz, Neb- 
raska; Gwendol Butler, Indiana; 
Michael Cherniaweski, Michigan; 
Robert Clark, Mninesota; Herbert 
Goodwin, Tenn. ; Lester Guen- 
ther, Mo.; Kenneth Jamieson, 
Oregon; Jerald Jordan, Michigan; 
Richard Dee Kirkpatrick, Califor- 
nia; John Kubis, Wisconsin; 
Myron Lee, California; Lawrence 
Leitson, Michigan; Tom Ligon, 
South Carolina; Leslie Massey, 
Indiana; James Melvin, District 
of Columbia; Lyle Mortensen, 

(See ENROLLMMENT page 3) 
_V 

Dr. Hall Gives 
Opening Speech 

The first of the regular Sunday 
evening Chapel services for the 
new school year was held in Cha- 
pel Hall on Sunday evening, Sep- 
tember 2 6th. President Percival 
Hall delivered an interesting and 
educational lecture on the history 
of Gallaudet College. With the 
aid of the blackboard and various 
pictures, President Hall was able 
to paint a vivid picture of the 
college from the date of its found- 
ing to the present time. He 
closed his lecture with a .brief 
prayer. After the services, many 
of the students remained in the 
Chapel to get a closer view of the 
pictures of the college buildings 
in early days and to hear Dr. Hall 
relate more of the interesting his- 
tory of the college and its found- 
er. 



Page Two 



The Buff and Blue 



Saturday, October 23, 1943 



The Buff and Blue 



Published once a month during October, De- 
cember, January, February and twice a month 
during November, March, April and May. Entered 
at the Post Office at Washington as second-class 
mail matter. 

Subscription Price $2.00 per year 

(Payable in advance) 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Malvine Fischer, '4 4 

LITERARY EDITOR Bertt Lependorf, '44 

NEWS EDITOR Byron Hunziker, '4f. 

SPORTS EDITOR . .-- Lyle A. Wiltse, '46 

ASS'T SPORTS ED Clarhelen Wilkinson, '4 5 

ALUMNI EDITOR Winfield S. Runde, '01 

ASSOCIATES 

Robert Panara, '4 5 Agnes Carr, '4 5 

Earl Elkins, '46 Christel Erdmann, '4 5 

REPORTERS and COLUMNISTS 

Caroline Tillinghast, '44 Carlie Todd, '44 
John Randolph, '45 Calvin George, '45 

Betty-Jo Raines, '46 Jean Smith, '4 6 

Ralph White, '46 Nadine Nichols, '46 

Earline Becker, '47 Thomas Fishier, '47 

Mervin Garretson, '4 7 

BUSINESS MANAGER Calvin George, '45 

ASS'T BUSINESS MANAGER . Donald Padden, '45 
CIRCULATION MANAGER . Harold Steinman, '4 6 
ADVERTISING MANAGER . . Charles Pollock, '4 4 

ASS'T ADV. MANAGERS . . Frank Sladek, '4 6 

Wayne Schlieff, P. C. 

PRINTERS 
Leonard J. Meyer, '44, FOREMAN 
William Brightwell, '4 6 Jason Amnions, '47 
Bertt Lependorf, '44 Wayne Furlong, '46 

Charles Pollock, '44 

PROOFREADER Patricia Mcintosh, '47 



LEADERS IN THE MAKING 
Last summer many predicted the closing of 
college, the only place where the deaf can ob- 
tain higher education, at least for the duration. 
Contrary to popular opinion, Gallaudet opened 
wide her doors in September, and it seems likely 
that it will continue to do so in the years to 
come. 

Rumors spread like wildfire, and if they are 
fanned by a lot of wind, the flames will rise 
higher and higher, and do considerable damage. 
It would be a good idea to regard them as being 
idle talk, and to treat them as such. 

In spite of the belief entertained by some 
last year that there would be a scarcity of boys 
in the Preparatory class this year, the number 
is greater than ordinarily. Which means that 
the lure of a college education is not wholly 
superseded by the glamour of working in a war 
plant. Besides, many have come back after 
having had a year's leave of absence, after hav- 
ing had a "taste" of both college and factory 
life. 

In reply to the argument that for the deaf 
to remain at college when there are golden op- 
portunities in the business world now is a waste 
of time, we would say it is as much a waste of 
time as for one to include in his medical train- 
ing a course in anatomy. The ''worthwhile- 
ness" of a college education to the deaf person 
will be clearly seen in the postwar world. It 
will have prepared him to meet successfully 
whatever difficult problems may arise. It will 
enable him to secure positions of an executive 
nature an well as positions in factories. Since 
it is well-known that in most cases the deal 
person can adapt himself rapidly and without 
much difficulty to the intricacies of manual 
labor, he need not spend much time learning 
how to work with his hands. If he be capable 
of using skills other than the physical, it would 
be unjustifiable to deprive him of the right to 
further the training of these faculties . . name- 
ly, those of the mind. Secondly, it is an ac- 
cepted fact that any organization cannot exist 
or function successfully without a leader. So 
is it with the deaf as a society. Many of the 
leaders of the deaf are, and have been, college 



graduates. After the war, capable leaders will 
be greatly in demand to salvage whatever they 
can from the chaos that will surely follow in its 
wake. The deaf world will be no exception. 
Therefore, if courses at Gallaudet were discon- 
tinued, who will do the job? 

Even now, right here, leaders are in the 
making. Owing to the dent made in the College 
Faculty this year by the resignation of some 
teachers, members of the Senior class were asked 
to take over some of their duties. Within the 
space of a month, they have proved themselves 
capable of carrying on the work of those much 
older and much more experienced than they. 
These young men and women are making much 
of the opportunity for practical experiences and 
it is most likely that a.s a result they will go 
forth into the world self-reliant and confident. 
■ ■ ■ ■■ : ■ : ■ : ■ ■ : ■ . . - ; . - , i : , . ■ , j , ; 1 1 ; i : i . i ; : , ! ! : . i , i : i ; i ; [, i : i . i i i ; , ; 1 1 , ; , i : ! , i , ; ; i : i . 1 1 ; ! ; , ; , : : . , : [ ! . I J i ^; ; . : . : : : '.■:... ;..:: : . I . : . . : __ 

I As We See It I 



Jean Smith, '46 



""S 



The Hurdy Gurdy 

N. Nichols and J. Randolph 



Times change. In a forgotten yesterday Pre- 
parats came from afar to stare at a vast mill of 
upper classmen. Today? Worried Uppers can be 
seen wandering around the campus with a bewild- 
ered look on their faces. The reason? The task of 
trying to remember who's who among the "Rats" 
simply has them stunned — it's just like watching 
a herd of cattle and trying to remember which is 
which . . . Dapper Dappy is still obviously at his 
minor game of love . . . Once again the familiar 
faces of Chick, Tiny, Jamie and Goody grace our 
campus. Lost lambs are always welcomed back 
into the fold . . . Incidentally, most of the "mar- 
ried" unmarried students are back; apparently 
the lure of college was stronger tnan the desire 
for marriage . . . Last year Garry came to college 
with a pair of cowboy boots — this time he went 
onie step further — he brought back a girl in- 
stead of the boots . . . Chick is clucking and woo- 
ing a certain young lady from Cm«o, a recent ad- 
dition to the collegei ... A "Genuine Western Cow- 
girl" has come back to Gallaudet in the person 
of Betty Hogan . . . The D. S. is again enjoying a 
sudden boom in the coke and malted milk business 
after a relapse of several months — the boys are 



back with money to burn . . . Baldy probably has 
some "nice" plans Hatching now . . . Calvin is still 
on a wild goose chase, or so it seems, and yours 
truly is still fazed as to his prospects in French. 

Such generosity on the part of the Seniors 
should be duly recognized. June tells us about the 
movie she saw which was titled "For Whom the 
Toll Bells." And Julie, returning "with a slave- 
ring on her handle," calmly denies that the knit- 
ting is for Britain. Lupo was so thrilled over her 
trip back by plane that the girls' pleads for an 
explanation could bring only a stammered "Goody- 
Goody." 

O 'Hogan, hearing about the advent of Becker, 
returned to give competition. Or is it a lass in 
Baltimore who's gonna get it? Couia pictures on 
the bureau be mis-leading? 

Watson from Wyoming didn't want to, was too 
busy to, and didn't feel like, going to the D. S. last 
week. Why, she didn't know Gary was sick in bed. 

The latest blond from Utah could be a Daisy for 
all his freshness. And come to think of it, have 
you noticed the wilted look being worn by Riddy 
since she left Akron? In case you're worrying 
about the folks back home, Riddy, they're all 
right. We wonder if we'll be in tnat good a con- 
dition after nine months with you. 

Smiffy's woeful gaze at the Empty- Without 
Him Chemistry Lab. is really touching. . . .almost 
as touching as the statement of M. Hughes' that 
Jamestown is in Virginia on the THAMES River. 



__i = i , ■;:,;;;;.:,:. ;■ ■ : . ■ ■ ■ : : ■ . : : " ; : ■ : . ■■.■■:.:;..:. : :ii ■ ■ .: : .■:;:: .^^ 

| Campus Chatter j 

Betty-Jo Raines and Ralph White 



m mm 



m 



m. 



Another school year has rolled around and we j 
are back in our scheduled lives again. Let's make I 
the best of it this time. | 

Of course, you do sufficient studying, eat sen- 
sibly (oh gee!), get enough sleep, take care of 
your health, and write to Grampa twice a year. 
But I am thinking of your off-side life — the part 
that isn't demanded of you. 

For instance, have you a fair idea of picturesque 
Washington (beyond the D.S. ana "H" street)? 
Preps, before you lose your enthusiasm for sight- 
seeing, set your pins in order and see the big 
things! After a few years away at college, the 
folks back home will naturally expect you to bring 
them an interesting account of the city in which 
you will have lived. 

Then, do you keep up a reasonable amount of 
correspondence? It's an excellent means of im- 
proving your English. Don't just write down oc- 
currences — go further. Use interesting data, try 
to develop new phrases, increase your vocabulary 
(especially adjectives), and above all — make your 
letters sound just like yourself. There is some- 
thing refreshing about the person whose letters 
make you say, "Why, that's just like him!" — and 
in a complimentary manner, too. On the other 
hand, there is the type of person who sounds like 
Ickes in his personal correspondence. Surely your 
friends rate more than a business report. 

Be popular among your sex as well as the op- 
posite sex. Many of us are content to shine only 
in the social world, but to be an "all-around good 
sport ", you should click wherever you are. 

Resolve to read a few good books a month and 
be versatile in your selection. There are various 
types of books, and the well-read person balances 
his reading so that he secures some knowledge 
from each. Let's ration poetry for awhile and 
catch up on reading good material while there's 
a library right on our campus. Poetry will always 
be at elbow reach in memory, countless magazines, 
and editions, but the books we should read aren't 
as widely distributed. 

A habit we couldn't learn in peacetime is easily 
cultivated now. . .the conserving of our general 
possessions. I'm skipping electricity, paper, and 
such to concentrate on Dad's headache. . .your 
clothing bill. Those simply 'hideous' dresses are 
that way because they haven't been altered other- 
wise. Combine ambition with ingenuity and save 
a pretty penny. 



Reader's Dri-Jest 

Caroline Tillinghast 



Joimy: The light of the sun travels at the 
rate of 186,000 miles a second. 

Lenny: Sure, but it's down hill all the way. 

— Tower. 

AaA 

Professor Hughes: Have you ever had any 
experience in dramatics? 

Sniift'y: I once had my leg in a cast. 

— Wilson Spectacles. 

AaA 

In 1941, women said: "Oh! What a man!" 

In 1942, women said: "Oh! A man!" 

In 1943, women said: "Oh! What's a man?" 

— Md. Diamondback. 

AaA 

Doc: Who was it that followed King Edward 
VI of England? 

Cussy: Queen Mary. 

Doc: And following Mary? 

Cussy: Her little lamb. 
AaA 

An American soldier in England, born and bred 
in the Southern state of Texas, was attempting to 
give a group of British Tommies some idea of the 
size of the United States. 

"Why, you can board a train in mah state of 
Texas at dawn," he said, "and tweny-four hours 
later you will still be right thar in Texas." 

"Yes," said one of the Britishers scornfully, 
"we've got trains like that here, too." — Hatchet. 

AaA 
Prep: How'm I doin' with this new stroke? 
Yirgie: You aren't swallowing so much water 
— doing more to the gallon. — Palmetto and Pine. 

AaA 
He stood on the bridge at midnight 
And tickled her face with his toes; 
For he was just a mosquito, 
And he stood on the bridge of her nose. 
— The Clipper. 
AaA 
Man lived happily thousands of years ago. Sure, 
women did all the work. 

AaA 

Krug: Give me the definition of a square, 
Norwood. 

Norwood: A square is a quadrilateral with 
all sides equal and the angles, right angles. 

Krug: Correct. Now give the tiame for a 
rhombus. 

Norwood: (after a moment's thought) . .A 
rhombus is a square pushed over. 

— Palmetto & Pine. 

AaA 

Jqrdan: Pardon me, does this bus stop ^t 
F Street? 

Goodwin: Yes, watch me and get off one stop 
before I do. 

Jordan: Thank you. — Palmetto & Pine. 

AaA 
Junebug — See my mew purse. It just matches 
my shoes. 

Bug — What does it have in it? 
Junebug — No thing. 

Bugs — Then you're wrong. It matches your hat. 

Palmetto Pine 
AaA 
Miss Yoder — Mortensen, Define the word 
'puncture! 

Mortensen — A puncture is a little hole in a tire 
usually found at a great distance from a garage. 

AaA 
"Said one skeleton to his neighbor in the next 
coffin, "If we had any guts at all, we'd get out of 
here." 

— The Stute 



1 



ii.tlhilliiliilillllii ll.l!llilllliil!liil!llllll:lln„ir 



"Welcome! Welcome!" the sombre beauty of 
the campus seemed to shout to those who answereu 
the tolling of the old Tower Clock. It echoed 
their determination to make good this year. With 
the ivy covering more of the old, weatherbeaten 
walls, and with another tree gracing the campus, 
we are off for another year. 

There seems to be an extra amount of green 
hair-bows bobbing hither and thither this year, 
what with twenty-one female "Rats' '....we cannot 
help seeing green. 

Spying out of the window at some certain time 
of the day, we will most likely see Mrs. McClure 
and Mrs. Sullivan wheeling their respective baby 
buggies about the campus, with a tiny tot trailing 
after each. My, how our family is growing! 

Dare we believe the rumor that J. B. McDaniel 
was doing hot number dancing one Saturday? 

Rex Lowman, '40, poet laureate or former days, 
was physically seen on the campus, not to write 
poetry, but for the sake of seeing friends. 

Bells of a different sort from that of the Chapel 
Tower pealed last summer. They signified the 
union of Miss Bernetta Borghorst and ixmie John- 
son, both ex-'45, as man and wife. Good luck to 
both! 

At all wee hours of the night "angels" in the 
form of the Uppers now pace about in the "Rats' 
Chapel" gazing upon those "heavenly bodies.'' 

What a spectacular sight was in tne Girls' Din- 
ing Room one Saturday! A conga line on the war- 
path with red paint! 

Two Akronites visiting the old haunts of Ken- 
dall Green the week-end of October 2nd were 
Max Spanjer, ex-'44 and Fred Schreiber, '44. 
The convertible of Ferdy's that glowed on the 
campus nearly caused a furor in the District Fire 
Department. However, we noted that his main 
interest was somewhere else, .... in Akron. 

Edmund Witczak, '46, got himself, entangled in 
a nasty affair with a car just before college opened, 
and found himself in the hospital. He is doing very 
nicely now, thank you. 



The Poet's Pack 

Contributions Made by the 
Student Body 



In an effort to induce you boys ana girls to take 
an active interest in this new addition to the Buff 
and Blue, Ye Ed. penned this and posted it on the 
bulletin board where it remained for quite some 
time: 

Cease your idle quack, 
Read this 'neath the tack... 
Tis for "Poet's Pack" 
Let's now dream! 

Squibble with your pens... 
Reason or nonsense 
(What's the difference?) 
Be your theme; 

Limerick, couplet, 
Verses through a sweat, 
Talents for to whet... 
That's the scheme. 

You and YOU and YOt 
Can contribute, too. 
For the Buff and Blue 

Let us team! 

Days passed. No one ventured any poem, not 
even "ditties of no tone." Hours wore on. Final- 
ly, a timid soul in the person of Ruby Miller, '47, 
hesitatingly handed in this product of her fancy: 

I am a little motor bus that runs 'round 

in the street, 
The nicest little motor bus that you can 

chance to meet. 
I have a dandy hobby that no one else 

can equal 
For who has heard of any one that likes 

collecting people? 

Here's another, 'written by one whose fancy runs 
in a different vein: 

FRIGID LOVE 

Said "General Electric" to "Miss Hot Stuff," 
On a rainy day... 

"What makes you think your fire's enough 
To melt my heart away? 

"You've sat on my lap," he accuses, 
"I didn't want it that way. 
Two years is enough for fuses, 
To burn and defrizzle away." 

Can "General Electric" with defrosted heart 
And refrigerated glance 
Expect Cupid to do his part 
And give him the half a chance? 

Must "Hot Stuff" go steaming thru life 
Neglected and alone... 
Wasting flame that cannot melt 
Her lover's icy tone? 

Jean Smith, '46 



Saturday, October 23, 1943 



The Buff and Blue 



PAGE THREE 



dl 



II). 



SPORT SLANTS 

by Lyle Wiltse 



In recognition of Physical Edu- 
cation Director English Sullivan's 
efforts toward the establishment 
of the first Cross Country team 
in the history of Gallaudet Col- 
lege, which attained ultimate 
success last fall by copping the 
Mason-Dixon Conference Cham- 
pionship, we will step aside from 
the sporting angle to the human 
side of matters. 

Gross country is one of the 
oldest sports in the world today. 
There were runners in the time 
of the Grecian civilization, and 
even before that age, who carried 
messages by foot and who treated 
it as a sport on a competitive 
basis. This sport developed into 
one of the main attractions of the 
famed Olympian Games. The 
ancients had endurance plus, as is 
demonstrated by the feat of Phei- 



Sullivan Changes 
Football Rules 



Students' Support 
Overwhelming 



New Addition to 
College Library 

Albert Berg, '86 
Writes Memoirs 



Old timers have doubtless often 
wondered why football has dwind- 
led away as a major intercollegi- 
ate sport at Gallaudet. This is not 
the only college today lacking a 
full eleven-man football team, 
for in recent years football on a 
wide scale ibasis was gradually 
abandoned by the larger colleges 
and universities centered around 
the District of Columbia. There 
being no opposing teams other 
than local high school squads, 
Gallaudet's grid stars forsook the 
rough and tumble art of inter- 
collegiate football for intramural 
touch football. 

Still another setback can ibe 
traced to the lack of funds for 
complete football equipment. 
However, the old spirit has not 
ceased to exist altogether. There 
has been a general clamor among 
the students for more excitement, 
more mudslinging than the tame 
seven-man game has to offer. In 
response to the demand, Coach 
Sullivan has replaced the anti- 
quated seven-man outfit with a 
nine-man outfit, revising a few of 
the rules. In substance, the sport 
will be very similar to eleven-man 
football with a few exceptions. 
Substituting the good old down- 
and-out tackle is the requirement 
that the "tackier" touch the ball- 
carrier on the body proper with 
both hands. Neck, arm, and leg 
touches are out of bounds. There 
will be four downs, ten yards to 
go, again this year, meaning that 
touchdowns will be the real 



The college library is proud to 
present a new addition to its 
shelves. The booklet, "From My 
Reliquary of Memories and Ran- 
dom Thoughts on the Education 
of the Deaf," is a gift from Mr. 
Albert Berg. 

Mr. Berg, the author of this 
booklet, graduated from Gallau- 
det with the Class of 188 6, and 
after further study received the 
degree of Master of Arts from 
the same college in 1895. He 
has devoted his entire life to the 
education of the deaf. 

The experiences he writes of 
should prove of great interest to 
the college students, for he tells 
of the Gallaudet of many years 
ago, and his anecdotes make it 
delightful reading. To the educa- 
tors of thja deaf and to those 
interested in this profession, the 
booklet should prove to be a 
wealth of inspixaton and informa- 
tion. 

McCoy, not to overlook the fre^ 
quent usage of the "language 
known to all tongues." 

The first intramural football 
game of the season, using the 
above-mentioned methods, took 
place Tuesday, October 12, the 
combined Senior-Junior teams 
squelching the Preparats, 13 to 0. 
In a way, the game was a trial 
test of the new nine-man touch 
technique, meeting with over- 
whelming approval by the specta- 
tors. 



CASSON STUDIO 



Photographers of the 1942 Buff and B,lue %* 



1305 Conn. Avenue N. W. 



DEcatur 1333 




IIUIIIItlllHII(llllUllllUlllflllllHIPtlllllllllliiiM!iUllit!lltHlllffilltUHttl! 

i 



• iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

GALLAUDET 



PHARMACY 



• Phone Atlantic 8880 • 
1000 Florida Ave N. E. - Washington, D. C 



Yankee Boosters Co-ed Athletics 
Get Free Ride Well Under Way 



KAPPA GAMMA 



(Continued from Page One) 



dippides, the Greek who began 
the Marathon by virtue of pacing 
26 miles to Athens to declare the 
news of the. defeat of the 
Persians. While it is no longer 
necessary to relay messages by 
foot in this modern world of 
today, these competitive races are 
still carried on, in reduced form. 
This is perhaps a summary of our 
present-day cross country tourna- 
ments, a test of courage and phy- 
sical endurance. 

The patience and the single- 
ness of purpose it takes for one to 
participate in a cross country 
event is beyond the imagination 
of the ordinary casual athlete. 
Praise and due credit is deserving 
to any and all Cross Corntry men, 
whether victors or losers, for their 
dogged determination to stick 
through to he end or to drop flat 
in the attempt. 



Turnabout is fair play — or is 
it? This year's hopeful boosters 
of the St. Louis Cardinals in the 
annual World Series experienced 
a serious blow to their ambitions 
when the JSTew York Yankees 
came through victorious with 
four wins to their credit and only 
one defeat. It will be remem- 
bered that during the 1942 World 
Series the Cards ravaged the 
Bronx Bombers in an onset com- 
parable to Rommel's rout from 
North Africa, minus the artillery. 

Anyhow, according to tradi- 
tion, the twenty-one befuddled 
martyrs who had bet their "John 
Hancocks" against the twenty- 
seven supporters of the Bronxies 
assembled in front of Old Jim 
and prepared to give their gloat- 
ing rivals a free ride upon the 
old hay wagon. Amid the tumult 
and confusion of flying arms, the 
gasps and grunts of the suffering 
and crestfallen St. Looey backers, 
with photographers edging in 
sidewise to catch a candid shot 
here and there, the procession 
set off straining and tugging like 
wind-broken plow horses under 
heavy harness, followed by com- 
mands and jerring taunts from 
the pompous rebels aboard. The 
route taken brought them around 
past Faculty Row, up the steep 
incline at the main entrance from 
Florida Avenue, thence along the 
front campus to Fowler Hall 
where our vanquished heroes 
were further disheartened by 
genuine bronx cheers from femin- 
ine hecklers. 



G.CW.A.A. to 
Award Letters 



In the place of medals, which 
are difficult to obtain nowadays, 
the Women's Athletic Association 
is giving out "G" letters every 
spring. This change came about 
last year at the GWCAA ban- 
quet in May, when the highly- 
prized letters were presented to 
those who came out first place in 
each of the various tournaments. 
The "G's" are in the college 
colors, buff and blue, and have 
sewn in them pictures represent- 
ing the various sports for which 
they are given. The young wo- 
men of the upper classes are eli- 
gible for these letters, and those 
in the preparatory class have to 
content themselves with the usual 
ribbon-prizes All those tak- 
ing second and third places, how- 
ever, are presented with ribbons. 
The coeds seem to be very much 
in favor of the change, therefore 
it is possible that "G's" will con- 
tinue to be given from now on. 



Compliments 
of the 

Curb Cafe 

714 H. St., N. E. 



1223 H. St., N. E., AT 9354 

FELDMAN'S 
The Store For Distinctive Jewelry 
Watches Diamonds Silverware 

(Repairing of All Kinds) 



The coeds began their athletics 
for the year with tournaments in 
tennis and archery. Both tour- 
naments are well under way at 
this writing, but the question as 
to who will be the winners is far 
from answered and it will take 
much more playing to decide it. 
Each girl plays two matches of 
tennis and two rounds of archery, 
a week. These tournaments are 
at present confined to the three 
upper classes, and the results will 
not be used to decide the winners 
of the trophy and the awards giv- 
en every spring. However, it does 
give the girls much practice and 
will develop their skill for the fi- 
nal tournaments to be held in the 
spring. 

A new fencing group of girls is 
getting its lb-ear ings under the di- 
rection of Miss Margaret Yoder, 
who has been instructor of fencing 
for several years. Miss Yoder has 
been very successful in her work, 
and we feel that with the old and 
new members who form this 
year's group we will have a fine 
fencing team. 

— V 

SCHLEIFF RETURNS 

(Continued from Page One) 



officer, "Tiny" was under observa- 
tion for a month and subjected 
to blood tests, X-rays, fleuroscop- 
ing and all other of the latest 
methods of medical testing. 

Right now, civilian Schleiff is 
perfectly willing to have another 
crack at higher education at Gal- 
ludet College, although he is 
rather doubtful as to the design- 
ation his latest classification (1C) 
holds. Since the war-vet left in 
the first term of his preparatory 
year, he is starting from scratch 
again. 

We are all happy to have him 
uacK, especially so is Coach Sul- 
livan whose looming cloud over 
the coming basketball season has 
now taken on a somewhat sil- 
very lining. Attaboy, Tiny, best 
o' luck to you. 

V . 

Subscribers, Please Note! 

Due to the increased cost of 
publication, the staff of Thje 
Huff" and Blue has found it ne*- 
cessary to increase the subscrip- 
tion rate for the current year 
from one dollar to two dollars. 
The subscription rate will be re- 
turned to the former low level 
as soon as possible. We wish 
to state that we sincerely regret 
that this increase in price was 
necessary and hope that our 
subscribers will cooperate with 
us in this untforseen emergency. 
Tliis increase in the subscrip- 
tion rate will not affect those 
subscribers who have placed 
their orders prior to this issue. 

THOMPSON'S 
BARBER SHOP 

Orleans Pjace near Florida Ave. 
Hair Cut As You Like It 

50 cents 
Hours: 11 to 8 
9 to 9 Saturdays 



i ww iw mM H iWi t mwotmMn w ww w B Mi 



)tl«l«fl«MI!*ri8d«tl«»I^^K«^^ 



SHOP NEAR BY 



Gaffi 



ins 



Men's and Boys' Wear 



Dress and Sports Wear 



Work Clothing 



925 H Street, N. E. 



Phone TRindad 8833 



and Bro. Sladek. 

Entertainment — Bro. Mukhtar, 
chairman, Bro. Pollock, Bro. 
Ayers, and Bro. Hirte. 

Banquet. — Bro. McClure, chair- 
man, Bro. J. Hall, Bro. Pollock, 
Bro. Elkins, and Bro. Furlong. 

Maintenance— Bro. Kedemon, 
chairman, Bro. Moore, Bro. Pad- 
den, and Bro. Brightwell. 

Scholarship — Bro. Plotitsky, 
Bro. Padden, and Bro. Steinman. 

Auditing — Bro. M. Plotitsky, 
Bro. Ayers, and Bro. Sperry. 

Dance Committee — Bro. Paul 
Baldridge, chairman, Bro. Moore, 
Bro. Ayers, Bro. Padden, and 
Bro. Elkins. 

Bro. Elkins was elected as Fra- 
ternity Editor for the coming 
year. 



Organization Directory 



A. S. F. I). 

Pres. — Leonard Meyer, '4 4 
V. P. — Donald Padden, '45 
Sec. — Donald Wilkinson, '4 5 
Treas. — Henry Krostoski, '4 5 
Ass t Treas. — Frank Sladek, '4 6 



ENROLLMENT 



(Continued from Page One) 



Utah; Herschel Mouton, Texas; 
John Murphy, Connecticut; Law- 
rence Newman, New York; Mal- 
colm Norwood, Conn.; Barrel 
Robinson, Montana; Wilbur Ruge, 
Nebraska; Wayne Schleiff, Ark- 
ansas; Burton Schmidt, Wiscon- 
sin; Fred Yates, Virginia; Dar- 
win, Younggren, Minnesota. 

The two who broke away from 
the flock and found greener pas- 
tures in the Frehman class are: 
Marjoriebell Stakley and Norma 
Bushley, both of Ohio. 



FACULTY SUMMER 

(Continued from Page One) 



claims he saw abou two movies 
and ate away from home only 
three times. Tough going, wasn't 
it? 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Kline re- 
mained in Washington for six 
weeks, she to study at the Cath- 
olic University and he to make 
repairs around the campus. They 
visited his home in Washville, Il- 
linois, for three weeks, and then 
hers in Akron, Ohio, for two 
weeks. 

Dr. Powrie V. Doctor spent 
most of the summer working on 
the Index to the Annals for the 
Deaf here. He visited Ocean City, 
New Jersey, on a short vacation. 

Prof. F. Smith remained at his 
summer home at Colonial Beach, 
Va. on the Potomac resting and 
fishing. How many whoppers did 
you catch, Mr. Smith? 

Mrs. R. Temple, better known 
as "our Remmy,'' went home to 
Middleton, Maryland, for a while 
prior to working for the Retail 
Co. in Washington here. Around 
the middle of July, she began 
preparing her trousseau for mar- 
riage to a likeable young chem- 
ist, becoming Mrs. on September 
4 th. 

Prof. Wm. McClure worked 
most of the summer for the In- 
vestigating Agency in Washing- 
ton, D. C. Two weeks hefore col- 
lege opened he visited his grand- 
parents in Kentucky. Then Ire 
visited his mother in Missouri 
and "picked up" Mary Hughes 
who had been staying with her in 
Fulton for the summer. 

Prof. Jon Hall made several 
short NYH bicycle trips this 
summer, visited the Hayden 
Planetarium in New York, and 
did some work for the GWU. He 
worried the draft officials and the 
draft officials worried him. 

Miss Margaret Yoder worked in 
the Editorial Promotion Depart- 
ment of Time, Inc. (publishers of 



Mrs. Geo. L. Sutton 

Mrs. L. Sutton Bailey 

ATlantic 1153 

PEOPLES 

FLOWER SHOP 

"Say with Flowers' ' 

900 H Street, N. E. 



Dramatic Club 

Pres. — Paul Baldridge, '4 4 
V. p. --Leander Moore, '4 4 
Sec. — Mervin Garretson, '4 7 
Treas. — Ralph White, '4 6 

G. C. A. A. 

Pres. — Charles Pollock, '4 4 
1st V. P. — Donald Padden, '4 5 
2nd V. P. — Henry Krostoski, '45 
Sec. — Donald Wilkinson, '45 
Treas. — Leander Moore, '44 
Ass't Treas. -Marvin Marshall, '47 

(i. C. W. A. A. 

Pres. — Julia Burg, '44 
V. P. — Celia Burg, '45 
Sec. — Betty Jo Raines, '4 6 
Treas. — Eaiiine Becker, '47 



Kappa Gamma 

Grand Rajah — P. Baldridge, '4 4 
Kamoos — Donald Padden, '45 
Tahdheed — Leonard Meyer, '4 4 
Mukhtar — Henry Krostoski, '4 5 

Literary Society 

Pres. — Ralph White, '4 6 
V. P. — Warren Blackwell, '4 6 
Sec. — Mervin Garretson, '47 
Treas. — Marvin Marshall, '4 7 

Movie Club 

Pres. — Meyer Plotitsky, '44 
V. P. — Harold Steinman, '4 6 
Sec. — Byron Hunziker, '46 
Treas.- -Marvin Marshall, '4 7 

(). W. L. S. 

Pres. — Caroline Tillinghast, '4 4 
V. P. — Agnes Carr, '45 
Sec— -Jean Smith, '4 6 
Treas. — Marjorie Case, '4 6 
Librarian — Frances Lupo, '44 

Photography Club 

Pres. — Bertt Lependorf, '4 4 
Sec. -Treas. — Leonard Meyer, '4 4 
General Mgr.— W Blackwell, '46 

Beading Room 

Chairman- Charles Pollock, '44 

Meyer Plotitsky, '44 

Donald Padden, '4 5 

Sec. -Treas. — Jack Hensley. '4 5 

Warren Blackwell, '46 

James Drake, '46 

V. M. S. C. 

Pres.- -Ralph White, '46 
V. P. — Jack Hensley, '45 
Sec. — Mervin Garretson, '4 7 
Treas. — Thomas Fishier, 4 7 

V. \V. C. A. 

Pres. — Frances Lupo, '44 
V. P. — Clarhelen Wilkins, '45 
Sec. — Nadine Nichols, '4 6 
Treas. — Aleatha Barnes, '46 
Chairman — Arlene Stecker, '4 4 
Ass't Chairman — Betty Stark, '45 



Time, Life, and Fortune.), for a 
large part of the summer in New 
York. Incidentally, she had her 
tonsils removed while there. 

Prof. English Sullivan spent the 
first part of the summer work- 
ing at the airport with airmail. 
He commened on the latter work 
as being very ineresting. 

Mrs. Alta P. Domich gave birth 
to a son on August 12, 1943. The 
second week of college found her 
at her desk again, where she had 
been for eleven years. 



Quality 



ART MUTH 

MATERIALS gg 



NORTHEAST 
CARD SHOP 

GBEETINO CABDS 

Stationery Gifts 
Photo- Work 
651 H St., N. B. 



Jack's Meat Market 

922 7th St., N. E. 

Fancy Groceries, Fruit And 

Vegetables 

Beer and Wine 

J. Greenstein, Prop. 



PAGE FOUR 



The Buff and Blue 



Saturday, October 23, 1943 



♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



NEWS OF THE ALUMNI 



By W infield S. Kunde, '01 



i<rank A. Andrewjeski, '16, 
Ashland D. Martin, '16, Arthur 
b. Rasmussen, '16, Russell Shaun- 
on, 16, Clifford Thompson, '16, 
iva M. Robinson, '11, and John 
xom Hower, '11, all have corn- 
service with the Goodyear Tire 
and Rubber Company. In appreci- 
ation of their long and faithful 
service each was recently awarded 
a diamond studdjed service pttp 
and $100 spot cash. Fine, boys! 
All of them, except Iva who is a 
printer, are engaged as clerks in 
different departments. 

V 

Adolph N. Struck, '12, is with 
the Goodrich Company. He oper- 
ates a monotype machine in the 
printing plant of the large com- 
pany. He is an expert along that 
line and he is the sole deaf oper- 
ator. Adolph is one of those fel- 
lows whose intelligence gets him 
around. He is well read and in his 
everyday life he is as punctual as 
was Ben Franklin who was wont 
to admonish the people with pithy 
sayings. Sure — Adolph is good 
company. We know! 

V 

Claxton Hess, '40, and wife, 
ex-'4 2, (Kathryn Miller) have 
moved from Annapolis, Md., to 
Spirit Lake, Iowa. There their 
depressed spirits have risen to a 
feeling akin to ecstasy because 
they both are with or near their 
parents. Claxton is a printer. 
V 

After farming in Iowa for many 
years George F. Wills, '99, and 
wife have left for the wilder 
climate of Glendale, Southern 
California. After leaving College 
George following the printing 
trade but as his health declined 
he took up farming on the advice 
of his physican. Today he is en- 
joying good health and he is 
mighty glad that he no longer ha* 
to cope with snow and ice. While, 
at College it is remembered that 
he was a student who placed his 
studies above all else. He was 
methodical and persevering and 
always pleased his professors. 
V 

Iva Weisbrod McConnell, '36, 
who was a substitute teacher last 
fall at the Council Bluffs School, 
is now engaged in a defense radio 
plant not far from the school. 
There are other deaf women ei - 
ployed there. Agnes, the wi e 
of the clever editor of the Hawk- 
eye, Norman V. Scarvie, '27, was 
the first deaf woman to be tried 
out by the company. She per- 
formed so well that the company 
soon called in others. Agnes truly 
has knocked the props out of pre- 
judice in this radio business, 
where even the ear amounts 
only to an ornament as far as 
precision work on radios is con- 
cerned. 

_ y 

Frederick Schreiber, '42, is en- 
gaged in making precision parts 
for anti-aircraft guns. When his 
mind is not on his lathe Fred 
cleans up and heads for Akron 
University where he is taking ad- 
vanced work which he hopes will 
help him to get established in the 
twenty-five dollars. 

V ■ 

Claibourne F. Jackson, an ex- 
of the dim past, who went to 
Cuba after leaving the Green, has 
been living in Oakland, Cali- 
fornia, for many years with his 
aged parents and sister. He had 
not been employed for any length 
of time while in Oakland, but 
now at last luck came his way and 
he has a good job in a factory 
that is engaged in the production 
of war material of some kind. 
V 

O. L. Intire, N-'21, teaching 
in the Texas School, has three 
sons — William, in the air force, 
George, a freshman in the Uni- 
versity of Texas, and Richard 
who is a High School student. 
O. L. was for a decade or so head 
of the Iowa State School for the 
deaf. Better a firm seat in Texas 
than a shorty throne elsewhere! 

In a recent issue of the Texas 
Lone Star there is a half tone cut 
of William Henry Davis, '99, com- 
memorating his 44 years of ser- 
vice to the Texas School. The 
article which accompanies the cut 



states that William has been a 
strong teacher, a leader whose 
influence has done much to ad- 
vance the high standing of the 
William seems to be at home and 
his delivery is so clear and full of 
pep that his audience pay rapt 
attention to wise enunciations. 
The training at the College "Lit" 
which he received has held him 
in good stead all through years. 
Such deaf teachers are in fact 
the core of the school where they 
spent their lives. 

V — 

Earl C. Norton, '35, was married 
to Kay Mains,, graduate of the 
Califorina School, some few 
months ago. The happy couple 
reside in San Francisco. Earl is a 
chemist in a photo establishment. 
His wife is doing some kind of 
remunerative war work. 

V 

Stephen Clarence Jones, ex-05, 
known on the campus as "Big 
Boy", is a retired Virgina teacher. 
He is living on a farm and is 
carrying his seventy or more 
years well. Steve iwas a large, 
heavy fellow and his work on the 
varsity football team was splen- 
did. Because of) his grjeat bulk, 
opponents managed to give him 
a wide berth — he was a vertiable 
stone wall against frenzied on- 
rushing gridders. At college 
Steve >was well liked because of 
his good nature and steady habits. 

V 

Frank Gearhart, ex- '39, aged 
8 3 and a widower owns two 
homes which are occupied by his 
two married daughters. One 
home is located in Laporte, Indi- 
ana, and the other in Mishawke, 
Indiana. Frank spends his time 
shuttling between the two places. 
Both daughters are always happy 
when their turn comes to make" 
dad comfortable. On his active 
days Frank did heavy work in the 
stifling heat of a foundry. The 
gruelling work enabled him to 
build up the rugged physique that 
has kept him in good health and 
spirits to this day. 

Wesley Lauritsen, '22 and '33, 
is Chairman of the Committee on 
Publicity and Research of the 
National Association of the Deaf, 
and under his direction an article 
entitled: "The American Dfeaf" 
was prepared and has been given 
extensive publicity in the e. p. f. 
The article covers a wide range 
of subjects having to do with the 
deaf — their education, methods of 
instruction, proper nomenclatures, 
causes of deafness, language 
difficulty, the use of the sign lan- 
uage on the lecture platform, 
sports among the deaf, organiza- 
tion of and by the deaf, organiza- 
as industrial workers and the' 
place of deaf citizens in the society 
of educated people. It is a concise, 
truthful document. It tells the 
world what is what in this 
segment of th human race. The 
enunciation comes from the hard 
experience of those who are deaf 
and who surmounted the many 
difficulties encountered in throwing 
off the shackles of the handicap. 
No theories or wishful thinking 
needed. It is an article that de- 
serves wide circulation. 

V 

The alumni editor is in re- 
ceipt of a complimentary copy of 
a booklet entitled: "From My 
Reliquary of Memories and Ran- 
dom Thoughts on Education of the 
Deaf." It was written by Albert 
Berg, '86. Albert has been an in- 
valid for some years and to while 
away time in his wheel chair he 
set down in masterly English re- 
miniscences of his active days. 



The booklet of sixty four pages is 
replete with humorous as well as 
pathetic incidents covering a long 
life of human contacts. The book- 
let was printed at the North 
Dakota School for the Deaf by 
Nicholas Braunagel, '27 and the 
instructor in printing, Ernest 
Langenberg, '24. It is a splendid 
specimen of the printers' art. The 
contents of the booklet will ap- 
peal especially to oldster grad- 
uates of the college and may be 
had for one dollar. Address: Al- 
bert Berg, 207 4th Street, Council 
Bluffs, Iowa. 

Norman G. Scarvie, '27, spent 
part of the summer lifting the 
face of his house near the Iowa 
School where he is now voca- 
tional supervisor and editor of 
the Hawkeye. Norman not only 
possesses well trained hands, but 
he also is a talented writer and 
his editorials show the orderly 
reasoning power of the experi- 
enced mind. He w r as offered a 
place in the California School, it 
is understood, ibut declined even 
though it meant an advance in 
salary and a more favorable cli- 
mate. Iowa could not be deserted 
by this sturdy, resolute descen- 
dant of the Norse. To induce him 
to stay put, Superintendent Berg 
(worrying about teacherTshort- 
age) appointed Norman's wife, 
Agnes, to a teacher's position. 
Though not college educated she 
is said to oe a very capable well- 
read woman, who, by virtue oi 
being the mother of two fine chil- 
dren, understands youngsters. 
V 

Mrs. E. Florence Long, one of 
the members of the first class of 
co-ds at Gallaudet, widow of the 
late lamented Dr. J. Schuyler 
Long, '89, has had so many re- 
quests for her late husband's book 
on signs (as used by the deaf) 
that she is thinking of getting 
out a third edition. During and 
after World War I there was a 
brisk demand for the book from 
soldiers and sailors who became 
deaf or deafened as a result of the 
terrific noise caused by gunnery 
and almunition explosions. E. 
Florence is a teacher in the Iowa 
school where her husband was 
principal for many years. Her 
daughter Dorothy, N-'18, wife of 
Dr. William Thompson, Dean of 
the department of psychology at 
Omaha University, remained in 
Omaha all summer and E. Flor- 
ence was with her much of the 
time. 

V 

Mary Doibson, '25, teacher in 
the Iowa School, passed part of 
her summer vacation running a 
power machine — making canvas 
goods for the armed forces. It 
is said that Mary is a power 
wherever she moves and the 
youngsters at her school uncom- 
sciously feel the force of her per- 
sonality which is reflected in their 
lessons. As a power machine 
operator she led all her women 
co-workers in production. 
V 

Eric Malzkuhn, '43, product of 
the California School, has landed 
in the Flint, Michigan School 
where he is teacher of Science 
Malz, disciple of Thespis the 
Greek, dramatized in the sign 
language the play "Arsenic and 
Old Lace" and staged the show 
before a packed house in New 
York City. The result was con- 
siderable favorable publicity of 
the deaf as dramatic artists. On 
the Michigan School Malz may 
have the opportunity to organize 
talented pupils and bring to the 



stage at the school and the won- 
dering student body the ancient 
Greek drama that was staged on 
the Acropolis of Athens. Eric, 
heavy weight and tall, dressed 
in the knee length skirts of the 
Greek, would not look one whit 
like a spurious Thespis! 

V 

S. Robey Burns, '19, connected 
with the War Food Administra- 
tion, was transferred to San 
Francisco from Washington, D. C. 
last summer. But as his aged 
mother, to whom he is greatly 
devoted, lives 'near Chicago he 
requested that he be again trans- 
ferred to the windy city. The 
authorities recognized the urgen- 
cy of his appeal at once ordered 
him to Chicago. While in San 
Francisco he met old friends and 
met new ones. He gave a lantern 
slide exhibition of his European 
trip at the home of Mr. Charles 
J LeClercq and wife (Cora Hites- 
man, an ex.) Among those pre- 
sent were, George Hall Whit- 
worth, '20 and Mrs. Eta Etta 
Earsley Whitworth, '22. Later 
Robey was the guest of Winfield 
S. and Frances (Norton) Runde, 
'01, at a buffet supper. Robey 
connection with his work, gave 
a talk and lantern slide exhibition 
to the deaf of the Southern Cali- 
fornia City. 

V . 

The sudden death of Victor R. 
Spence, '03, at Faribault, Minn- 
esota last May, cast a poll over 
the school Iwhere he had been 
teaching ever since he left Kendall 
Green with his degree under his 
arm. Vic had just completed hig 
school work for the year and as 
he strode across the campus on 
his way home he was suddenly 
seized with a heart attack. He 
was a good teacher, always faith- 
ful to the trust imposed on those 
who are privileged to lead youth 
in the pursuit of knowledge. At 
college he was studious and could 
almost always be. found in his 
room pouring over his books. He 
possessed a cheerful disposition 
and was well liked by the student 
body. 

V 

Dorothy White, N-*31, has left 
the California School to teach iv 
the Sacramento Oral Day School. 
Her going has deprived the Cali- 
fornia School of one of its finest 
teachers. She was a regular con- 
tributor to the California News, 
and her breezy and always inter- 
esting items about the doings of 
the teaching staff will be greatly 
missed. Her father, Cyrus, N-'98, 
will continue to live in Berkeley 

V 

Ben M. Schowe, Jr., '42 and 
Laura E. Knight, '42, were mar- 
ried last June. Ben was teaching 
at the time in the Virginia School 
for the Deaf and Laura was Li- 
brarian at the College. Now Ben 
is presiding over a classroom In 
the Ohio School at Columbus — 
which is quite a jump and an 
agreeable promotion. Ben M., Sr. 
'18, is a chemist in Akron, Ohio. 
He is a tireless worker in behalf 
of the adult deaf. He is also a 
lecturer whose utterances via the 
sign language vibrate to far 

uiiiiimmimmiimiiiiiiiiimiiimiiin 

1 5430 Conn. Ave. EM 0551 | 

1 GEO. F. TUDOR | 

MANUFACTURERS 
E RKPHESENTATTVH 

= Caps — Gowns — Rings — Pins = 
S Keys — Trophies — Medals 5 
aflllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll(MMliiM>n 



places, even as Big Ben sends his 
strong strokes sounding over the 
Vastness of London compelling, 
all to pause and mentally say — 
'that's Big Ben of Parliament 
House." 

V 

Howard Tracy Hofstealer, '30, 
and wife (Ellen Parker Davidson, 
'28) have left Alabama for good, 
and are now in Oakland, Califor- 
nia. Howard has a splendid fu- 
ture as a linotyper on the Berke- 
ley Daily Gazette. Both are in 
love with the San Francisco bay 
region. Last September Howard 
(or Hoffy to you) delighted the 
members of the San Francisco 
Club for the Deaf with a reading 
from Shakespeare — Comedy o f 
Errors. Those who have seen him 
on the stage give him the palm 
for impressive sign delivery. 
Both Hoffy and Marie are wel- 
come additons to the ever grow- 
ing coterie of East Bay silent col- 
lege folks. 

. v 

The stork left twin sons August 
22 to make lively the hearth and 
home in Berkeley of Emil Stepihen 
Ladner, '35, and wife (Mary Till 
Blackinton, '36). They have been 
named Richard Emil (6 lbs. 3 
oz.), and David Alan (6 lbs. 1 
oz. ) . .Now it is Dick, Dave and 
Sue, necessitating three shifts 
in the Ladner flat. 



Catherine Marshall, '39, im- 
proved her prospects in the Cali- 
fornia School by attending the 
summer session at the San Jose 
State College. 

V 

The many friends of Byron B. 
Burnes, teacher of mathematics 
and editor of the News at the 
Berkeley, California School for 
the Deaf were greatly surprised 
when they learned that he had 
gone to Reno, Nevada September 
8 and clamed as his lawful wife — 
to have and to hold forever — 
Winsome Mrs. Edna Watson Kar- 
nofsky of Arizona. A sweet and 
pretty daughter of eleven sum- 
mers now calls Byron her new 
Dad. During the summer B B B 
made extra money as an architect 
in a pipe machinery plant which 
is full up with important Govern- 
ment orders. 

V 

Erne Weseen Anderson, '18, left 
her Texas home last summer to 
visit her aged father and relatives 
in Nebraska. While there she 
visited the Treukes of Omaha and 
the Dobsons and Netusils of Coun- 
cil Bluffs. Her presence among 
old scenes and old friends was the 
signal for several complimentary 
parties in her honor. Dr. Tom, 
'12, was too busy in Texas to ac- 
company her. Tom, as you may 
know, has been acting as place- 



ment officer for the deaf of Texas. 
In that responsibility he has made 
good and every body down there 
is happy. At this writing Erne is 
back in her classroom. 

V 

Norma Corneliussen, '41, for- 
merly of the Arizona School, now 
instructor of cooking in the Iowa 
School, spent the summer working 
alongside her brother in law, 
Emerson Romero, in New York at 
the Republic Aircraft Corporation 
making cowls for P. 3 8 Thunder- 
bolts. She was so efficient that she 
won an E-pin. While in New York 
she made the acquaintance of the 
second baby born to her sister. 
V 

Edward Tillinghast, N-'34, Sup- 
erintendent of the Tucson, Ari- 
zona School for the Deaf, took his 
wife and son to Laguna Beach, 
California because of the summer 
heat in Arizona. Ed has improved 
and enlarged the vocational de- 
partment of his fine school. A 
new linotype machine has been 
added to the Cactus office. The 
shoe shop has new machinery and 
the facilities in the bakery have 
been extended so that the classes 
in baking may learn up to date 
methods of preparing dough in 
order later to make dough! We 
take off our hat to Ed. for doing 
the right thing by the deaf chil- 
dren of his school in appointing 
to positions, where they are best 
needed, a number of well trained 
former students of Gallaudet. He 
also appointed Catherine Poshus- 
ta, N-'43, to the faculty. Cather- 
ine is the daughter of Walter F. 
Poshusta, '09, of Iowa. 

V 

Emily Sterck Tell, '20, now 
lives in San Francisco as her hus- 
band, Fred S. has a wax job. 
Formerly Emily taught in the 
Arizona School. When she mar- 
ried, she stepped out of the class- 
room and her husband stepped in- 
to the vacancy thus created. Being 
a graduate of an Iowa hearing 
University he fitted into the work 
and was for some years instruct- 
or in mathematics. He has a taste 
for architecture and probably will 
follow that calling. 

_ V 

Anna Stout Divine, '01, valued 
teacher in the Vancouver, Wash- 
ington School for the Deaf did 
some traveling during the sum- 
mer, visiting her old home in 
Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, At- 
lanta, Chicago, and other places. 
From the Windy City she went 
by train directly to that cozy 
home so recently built overlook- 
ing the broad Columbia river. 
Truly a pedagogue returning to 
the classroom, after roaming a- 
broad, (brings to hr labors on at- 
mosphere and broader outlook 
that is refreshingly sweet and 
contagious to the young learners. 



WOODWARD & LOTHROP 



11th and F St., N. W. 



'avueA. 



LITTLE 

> Ninth Street South 9 
of G 

Hearing aids for 

most seats 
FIRST RUN and 
REVIVAL 



See daily papers for 
^ programs 



A 




Key Ifou* Wa>i&iake 
7a l/owi GmaaacmIhsh 



Bliss Warren is the far-sighted counsellor 
of Our School Outfitting Service, a depart- 
ment devoted to the building or refreshing 
of campus wardrobes. Let her make sugges- 
tions to key yours to these busy times of 
accelerated programs and extra-curricular 
volunteer work. You will find, her on the 
Fourth Floor 'with our Young Fashions. 



Mollycoddle Games 
Thanksgiving 



THE 




Ih'ainatic Club 
December 1<> 



VOLUME LII, NUMBER 3 



GALLAUDET COLLEGE, KENDALL GREEN, WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Wednesday, November 24, 194. \ 



HIT OF "BACK THE ATTACK" SHOW 




Victory Fund Goes 
To Red Cross 



One of Three Club- 
Mobiles in Army Show 



(A. F. P. H. News Release) 

At the monster "BACK THE 
ATTACK" show, presented by the 
Army, on the Washington Monu- 
ment Grounds, there was a section 
devoted to Red Cross activities. 
Included in this exhibit was a 
vehicle around which were con- 
stantly clustered sp-rvicp men and 
women, from privates to high 
ranking officers. This car, known 
as a "Cluibmobile", was used in 
dispensing refreshments. The sol- 
diers, sailors, marines and coast 
guards waited in line, advancing 
slowly, and as each approached 
the serving table, they read these 
words neatly painted on the car 
door, under the Red Cross in- 
signia: 

"Presented by the Deaf of the 
U. S. A. through the N. A. D." 

The Clubmobile is used by the 
Red Cross as a mobile recrea- 
tion unit, to serve air fields, out- 
posts, and bivouac areas in India, 
the Middle East, North Africa, 
Sicily, and Great Britain. When 
necessary, it can be used as an 
ambulance. This is one of the 
three Clubmobiles presented to 
the Red Cross by patriotic 
American Deaf citizens. 

One of the pretty attendants, 
Miss Anita Hebert, a Red Cross 
Clubmobile worker, said, "This 
Clubmobile had never ibeen used 
before last week. The Deaf were 
wonderful to give it to us. The 
boys say it is the best thing in the 
show. We serve about 4,000 
doughnuts and 100 gallons of 
coffee a day. " 

This particular Clubmobile was 
sent overseas as soon as the 
"BACK THE ATTACK" show 
was over September 26, 1943. It 
is not known where the car was 
sent. The workers and cars are 
handled with the same secrecy as 
personnel and equipment of the 
Army itself. 

— , — . _v 

Gallaudet Represented 
At Installation Ceremony 

Dr. Powrie Doctor represented 
Gallaudet College at the installa- 
tion ceremony of the Rev. Patrick 
Joseph McCormick as Rector of 
Catholic University Tuesday, No- 
vember 11th. Delegates from over 
three hundred universities, col- 
Iges and educational and religious 
organizations were present. The 
Rev. McCormick, whose appoint- 
ment is made by the Pope, is the 
sixth Rector of Catholic Univer- 
sity which was founded in 1887. 



Prof. P. Hall, Jr. 
Speaks in Chapel 

Speaker at the Sunday evening 
Chapel Services October 31 was 
Professor Percival Hall, Jr. His 
talk centered on the finer quali- 
ties of the college and its merits 
which many fail to appreciate. 
Professor Hall described the 
various things that go on behind 
the scenes in the college during 
this generation of war. The 
students lead a relatively normal 
life, and to all outside appear- 
ances everything is proceeding as 
usual. However, there is much 
£dO¥« ,oi.. ,i/ be done behind the 
scenes now than there was in 
peacetime. It is only through the 
cooperation and indefatigable aid 
of the employees of this college 
that we are able to remain here 
and study in these trying times. 
.Much also depends upon the co- 
operation of the student body in 
respecting college property and in 
performing as many odd jo'bs as 
possible. 

Professor Hall ended his lec- 
ture with an appeal to the stu- 
dents to cooperate with those who 
are making possible our way of 
living here and to accept with 
patience the lack of certain 
things. 

.y 

Community War 
Fund Drive Results 



Final results of the Community 
War Fund Drive on Kendall 
Green were announced two weeks 
ago. The student body of the 
College and Kendall School, and 
the faculty members contributed 
the total sum of $1059.10. That 
such a large sum should be col- 
lected is ample proof of the loyal- 
ty and willingness of the deaf. 
Military chiefs have commented 
on the immense morale building 
activities Of the fund, which will 
be used for the relief of service- 
men's organizations at home and 
abroad, to assist needy people in 
war-torn Allied countries, and to 
aid the families of our fighting 
men. 

Credit for the success of the 
drive on Kendall Green goes to 
Mrs. T. K. Kline, Miss Isabella 
Walker, and Prof. F. H. Hughes, 
who has been chairman of the 
Community Chest Committee on 
Kendall Green for a number of 
years. 

V 

SPECIAL NOTICE! 

Our catalog this year, due to a 
shortage of paper, will not contain 
the names and addresses of for- 
mer students and graduates as 
heretofore. If interested in re- 
ceiving a copy of the catalog, 
please make a written request to 
THE PRESIDENT, GALLAUDET 
COLLEGE. 



Navy Wins Mason- 
Dixon Meet 



Gallaudet's Blue Bisons bowed 
in defeat to the victorious Mount 
St. Mary's College harriers in the 
third annual Mason-Dixon Con- 
ference meet held on the spacious 
lawns of Kendall Green Saturday 
afternoon, November 20. In such 
little time did the hard won cross 
country crown pass on to other 
hands. We view the loss with 
regret, but the valorous honor of 
once holding the title has be«en » 
pleasant enterprise. Our boys ran 
valiantly against tremendous odds 
with laudable spirit. 

Representatives of six institu- 
tions entered the feat, numbering 
thirty six contestants in all, to 
wit: Gallaudet College, Loyola 
College, Catholic University, Ran- 
dolph-Macon College, Mount St. 
.Mary's College and Johns Hopkins 
University. The winning Mount 
St. Mary's harriers were last 
minute entrees, voicing their in- 
tentions to join on November 15. 
This team had not participated in 
any meet this season, literally 
turning out as a Dark Horse team, 
well trained. They were all Navy 
men in the V-12 training program 
at Mt. St. Mary's. J. H. U's Army 
men copped second. 

The contestants lined up for the 
start in front of Faculty Row at 
4 o'clock sharp. A minute later 
the gun barked the "go ahead" 
signal and they were off to an in- 
oredibly fast start. Crane of C. U. 
set the pace and maintained the 
lead throughout the event. Alli- 
son of J. H. U. was second while 
Hines, G, followed a close third. 
Hines fell back to fourth in the 
final lap. Gallaudet's remaining 
six men, Norwood, Stanley, Fish- 
ier, Kubis, Goodwin, and Alms 
came through with the leading 
batch of runners. 

Immediately following the meet, 
the college personnel and the par- 
ticipants moved to the Chapel to 
witness the presentation of awards 
by Pres. Percival Hall. To Mt. 
St. Mary's went the beautiful gold 
cup trophy donated by the Gal- 
laudet Pharmacy. Beloved "Doc" 
Hermon, proprietor of the drug 
store, made the presentation to 
Captain Starnimick of Mount St. 
Mary's. The second place trophy, 
donated anonymously, was pre- 
sented to Allison of J. H. U. by 
Prof. Frederick Hughes. Fifteen 
silver medals were presented to 
the first fifteen individuals to fin- 
ish, four of them being awarded 
to Gallaudetians, Hines, Norwood, 
Stanley, and Fishier. 

The final score: Mount Saint 
Mary's, 24; Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 32;- Gallaudet College, 37; 
Catholic University, 72; Loyola 
College, 86. 



Dramatic Club Will 
Present Program 

The Thesbians of Gallaudet Col- 
lege will make their debut for 
this year Friday evening, Decem- 
ber 10th. This night has been set 
aside as Amateur Night and will 
be sponsored by the Dramatic 
Club. This is an annual event and 
is designated in an effort to un- 
cover new talent among the mem- 
bers of the Freshman and Pre- 
paratory classes. For years the 
plan has been fruitful in discover- 
ing players for prominent parts in 
other feature attractions of the 
Dramatic Club. Previously, parti- 
cipation in Dramatic Club plays 
was limited to the members of 
the A. S. F. D., with the exception 
of "Arsenic and Old Lace", but 
this year the co-eds will be allow- 
ed to take part in the program. 

In the forthcoming stage pro- 
gram, four one-act plays will be 
presented. Under the direction of 
Paul Baldridge, '44, "The Perfect 
Gentleman" will be staged. Two 
other comedies entitled, "Hst! 
She's a Man" and "Chickadee," 
will also be given under the direc- 
tion of Mervin Garretson, '47, and 
Leander Moore, '44. Included on 
the program will be a novel patri- 
otic play, "I Pledge Allegiance," 
to be directed by Ralph White, 
'46. 

The program will be held in 
Chapel Hall at 8 p.m. Admission 
prices have been set at 25 cents 
for Kendall Greeners and 35 cents 
for outsiders. 

Armistice Theme 
Of Class Concert 



Dance Is Victory 
For Junior Class 



Using Armistice Day as its 
theme, the Junior Class presented 
the first class concert of the year 
in Chapel Hall on the evening of 
November 7. 

Professor Harley D. Drake, who 
assists with the preparation of 
these concerts, gave a short intro- 
ductory speech in which he ex- 
plained the purpose of the Com- 
munity Chest, stressing the im- 
portance of meeting the quota al- 
lotted to Gallaudet College for 
this year. Following the introduc- 
tion, Donald F. Wilkinson, Presi- 
dent of the class of '45, gave the 
salutation, emphasizing the belief 
that those who had given their 
lives in the First World War had 
not died in vain, even though 
there is another World War in 
progress today. Celia Burg ren- 
dered the poem, "The Anxious 
Dead," by John McCrae. Agnes 
Carr gave a story, "Armistice," 
in which she defined the true 
meaning of the word and explain- 
ed why we should continue to 
celebrate November 11th. Jack 
Hensley presented "In Flanders 
Fields," another of John McCrae's 
poems, in a strong and forceful 
manner. The concert was con- 
cluded with a short prayer by 
Calvin George. 

V 

Dillon Becomes Principal 
Of New Mexico School 



Word was recently received on 
Kendall Green of the promotion 
of Mr. Thomas J. Dillon to the 
position of Principal of the New 
Mexico School for the Deaf at 
Santa Fe, New Mexico. Previous 
to his advancement, Mr. Dillon 
served as a teacher in the ad- 
vanced department of this school. 
This enterprising alumnus of Gal- 
laudet College has also found 
time to pursue graduate study at 
the neighboring University of 
New Mexico, specializing in ed- 
ucation and psychology. Mr. Dil- 
lon, of the Class of 1940, has 
many friends on the campus who 
are glad to hear of his rapid climb 
to the top, and wish him much 
success in his new position. 



The first formal dance of the 
year, the Junior Prom, was held 
in Old Jim Saturday evening, 
November 13th, from 8 until 11 
o'clock. 

Playing host to what seemed to 
be as large an assemblage as has 
been recorded in the books, the 
Class of '45 transformed Kendall 
Green's hall-of-all-trades into the 
"S. S. Victory," flagship of the 
Freedom Fleet. The deck rails 
were spotless, the mast in perfect 
condition, the signal flags run up, 
and the bridge, containing an 
eight-piece band, absolutely ship- 
shape. The stars and planets 
hung low, and a gigantic new 
moon, just out of reach, shedding 
its "moonglow" upon the happy 
heads of the dancing couples. 

During the intermission, punch, 
small cakes and cookies were serv- 
ed in the swimming pool room. 
Painted on the walls were white 
anchors. The water in the pool 
added to the atmospheric effect. 

Much credit for the success of 
the dance goes to the committee 
which was composed of members 
of the Junior class, with Mr. Ro- 
bert Panara as chairman. 

The members of the faculty, 
alumni, and student body were 
received by the President of the 
Junior class, Mr. Donald Wilkin- 
son, and Miss Marilyn Hughes, 
and the chaperones, Miss Pelagi 
and Dr. Doctor. 

V — 



Noted Speaker 
Relates Odyssey 

Mrs. Colbjoernsen Tells 
Of Escape from Norway 



Yoder Announces 
Engagement 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Otis Yoder an- 
nounced the engagement of their 
daughter, Margaret Louise Yoder, 
to Mr. Douglas L. Keys, Jr., of 
New York on Sunday, November 
twenty-first. The wedding cere- 
mony will take place in Miss Yo- 
der's home town, Angola, Indiana, 
in January. 

Miss Yoder was graduated from 
the De Pauw University in 1937, 
received her M. A. degree from 
Gallaudet College in 1938, and did 
some graduate work at George 
Washington University and at 
Harvard. A member of the Facul- 
ty of Gallaudet College for six* 
years, she has taught classes in 
English, History, Shakespeane, 
and art appreciation. She is also 
fencing instructor of the college 
women. Mr. Keys, Jr., is a grad- 
uate of the Polytechnic Institute 
in Brooklyn, New York. 

Our hest wishes go with her in 
her new venture in life. 



Mrs. Ole Colbjoernsen of Nor- 
way related her unusual adven- 
tures following Germany's con- 
quest of Norway before an inter- 
ested and attentive audience in 
Chapel Hall Sunday evening, Nov- 
ember 14. The wife of a member 
of Norway's pre-war Parliament.. 
iurs. Colbjoernsen is now active in 
the Red Cross here in Washing- 
ton. With Dr. Hall interpreting, 
she told realisticaly the events 
leading up to her escape to Ameri- 
ca. 
On April 9, 1940, Mrs. Colbjoern- 
sen said, the Germans invaded 
Aorway. She herself was an un- 
willing eye-witness to many of 
theft' ravages. She recalled bonilb- 
ings of Red Cross hospitals, the 
establishment of concentration 
camps, and the abduction of Nor- 
wegian girls. She explained that 
j the Germans took the best. Their 
meat, blankets, and radios. The 
people are being compelled to pay 
millions of dollars for the "recrea- 
tional facilities" of the invaders. 
Many Norwegians have been sent 
to Germany to lead a lipte of 
slavery in plants and factories. 

Mr. Colbjoernsen had been safe- 
ly conducted to America at the 
outbreak of hostilities. He sent 
word for his wife to follow. After 
trying unsucessfully to otbtain a 
passport from the Gestapo in Nor- 
way, she and four companions 
took advantage of Norway's win- 
ter snow and crossed over to Swe- 
den on skiis. From there she 
made rapid progress. She travel- 
ed through Russia to Odessa, 
crossed the Black Sea, then to 
Iraq and India where she embark- 
ed on a ship for Capetown, South 
Africa. From Capetown she sail- 
ed to South America, Trinidad, 
and finally to the United States. 

The speaker said that she could 
not believe that the United States 
was near until she saw the inspir- 
ing Statue of Liberty. Once again 
on free soil, she was greeted by 
her husband after fourteen months 
of separation. In conclusion, Mrs. 
Colbjoernsen remarked that she 
did not feel like a foreigner in 
this "land of the free ; and the 
home of the brave." 

The students and faculty of Gal- 
laudet Colege are grateful to Mrs. 
W. J. McClure who was respon- 
sible for asking one of the most 
engaging speakers this year to 
speak in the Chapel. 



Private Benson Is Honored Visitor 



By Frances Lupo 

Never was an "enemy" more 
pleasantly surprised than when on 
October 25 th Private Elizabeth 
Benson, WAC, launched a one-* 
woman invasion on our unfortified 
Green. Although we Kendall 
Greeners immediately opened fire 
with a barrage of questions on 
WAC life and such, Private Ben- 
son easily out-maneuvered us with 
her humourous answers and in no 
time at all we were her "prisoners 
of war." But since Frederick, 
Maryland, the home of her par- 
ents, had also been mapped out as 
a strategic point of conquest, Pvt. 
Benson made haste in that direc- 
tion, for her "campaign" was lim- 
ited to ten days after which time 
she was to report back to Camp 
Oglethorpe, Georgia, for further 
duties. 

The day before the last of her 
ten-day furlough Benny (we aren't 
quite used to the Private Benson 
yet) spent all day chatting with 
old acquaintances on the Gre«*n. 
On the eve of her departure she 
spent the night in Fowler Hall 
and was very much at home, 
thanks to the noisy co-eds who oc- 
cupied the room above hers. The 
next day, Benny made the rounds 



of the classes, stopping over with 
the Family Relationship class to 
while away a good three-quarters 
of an hour with the Seniors. She 
explained a typical routine day 
with the WACs, the hell and heav- 
en of basic training, and the sun- 
dry miseries the poor buck private 
has to endure. 

Ever since the war broke out 
Benny has been doing various 
things to help in the war effort. 
First it was volunteer work for 
the Red Gross, then last year she 
joined the AWVS as an ambulance 
driver, as well as driving officers 
to and from camps. This fall she 
wient a step further and joined up 
with the WACs when it was still 
the WAAC. Benny tells us that 
nothing thrills her more than 
when her company marches to or 
from some destination, and there 
is the uniform swish of skirts, the 
strong inpiring tempo of the band, 
and the gallant waving of our flag 
on high. She could not stress it 
enough that she did not regret 
having joined the WAC, despite 
the numerous hardships she had 
and still has to encounter. 

We're mighty proud of you, 
Benny. Good luck, and hurry 
home to us! 



I'A'JE TWO 



The Buff and Blue 



Wednesday, November 21, 194;! 



The Buff and Blue 



Published once a month during October, De- 
cember, January, February and twice a month 
during November, March, April and May. Entered 
at the Post Office at Washington as second-class 
mail matter. 

Subscription Price $2. On per year 

(Payable in advance) 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF . . ." Malvine Fischer. '4 4 

LITERARY EDITOR Rertt Lependorf. '4 4 

NEWS EDITOR Byron Hunziker, '4fi 

SPORTS EDITOR Lyle A. Wiltse, '46 

ASS'T SPORTS ED Olarhelen Wilkins, '45 

ALUMNI EDITOR Winfield S. Runde, 'Hi 

ASSOCIATES 

Robert Panara, '4T. Agnes Carr, '4 5 

Earl Elkins, '46 Ohristil Erdmann. '45 

REPORTERS and COLUMNISTS 

Caroline Tillinghast, '44 Carlie Todd, '44 
John Randolph, '45 Calvin George, '45 

I!etty-Jo Raines, '46 Jean Smith, '46 

Ralph White, '46 Nadinc Nichols, '46 

Earline Becker, '47 Thomas Fishier, '47 

Mervin Garretson, '47 

BUSINESS MANAGER Calv.n George, '45 

ASS'T BUSLNESS MANAGER . Donald Padden, '45 
CIRCULATION MANAGER . Harold Steinman, '4 6 
ADVERTISING MANAGER . . Charles Pollock, '44 

ASS'T ADV. MANAGERS . . Frank Sladek, '46 

Wayne Schlieff, P. C. 

PRINTERS 
Leonard J. Meyer, '44, FOREMAN 
William Brightwell, '46 Jason Ammons, '47 
Bertt Lependorf, '44 Wayne Furlong, '46 

Charles Pollock, '44 

PROOFREADER Patricia Mcintosh, '4 7 




YEAR BOOK 

A year book is a permanent written record 
of the incidents covering the length of time 
spent by a graduating class in a high school 
or college. As well as being a tribute to the 
graduating class', the year book recalls the aetiv 
ities and contributions of other classes to the 
school. It offers the photograph album stiff 
. competition in bringing to mind pleasant 
memories. In this way the book often proves 
a priceless possession to the graduating class 
and to anyone vitally interested in the activ- 
ities of the school concerned. 

The members of the Senior class this year 
wish to be able to bring away with them <i 
memento of their years at Gallaudet. They feel 
.that it would be worth their while to print ;i 
year book in the form of a thick magazine in- 
stead of a mere booklet, as was the custom until 
a few years ago when the (Mass of '41 prepared 
a handsomely bound year book. The classes 
preceding had produced insignificant editions of 
the class annual, which was often part of ,i 
Literary issue of The Buff and Blur. 

Because of the low financial status of the 
Senior class this year, it lias been found neces- 
sary to devise ways and means to raise it to the 
level required to finance the type of book in 
mind. One of the plans hit upon has been put 
into practice, and so far. seems to be successful. 
This plan is the selling of sandwiches made by 
the Senior women, and of candy by the Senior 
men to the students on week-end nights. The 
Senior class wishes to thank everyone for his 
hearty support and hopes that it will not wane 



GIVING THANKS 

Thanksgiving this year will find us a little 
further in our purpose in this all-man's war 
than last year, but no further away from it. We 
should be thankful that we are not a conquered 
people, that our cities have not been bombed, 
and that we do not live in privation and terror. 
We should be thankful for our way of living. 
In order to be able to give thanks next year and 
the year after the next for these our blessings, 
we should do all we possibly can to preserve our 
rights . . . those of Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit 
of Happiness. 



^ttinNifnniHiiuitfUttutHiLUiiiiirinininiiEiiiJiiiaiuiuiiijititjfiiuiiiiriiiLiiJ 

As We See It 

Jean Smith, '46 



. i in in iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii n i 

Once in a while, it is "fitting 
and proper' ' to let other peo- 
ple do the talking. (Or writ- 
ing, far that matter.) We, 
who are firmly convinced that] 
all Prep ohilluns should be 
seen and not heard, are giving 
this year's flock the chance to 
uproot our theory. Here's the 
dope straight from undisputed 
territory, found under blue 
caps and green ribbons. 
All the newcomers were either "struck dumb" or 
"impressed" by the beauty of our spacious campus. 
The girls praised the well-kept appearance of our 
lawns and shrubbery, while the boys preferred to 
laud our beloved Chapel Tower and statue of 
Gallaudet. 

Congratulations to the Faculty — the Preps agree 
they sign very well and express themselves "so 
darn efficiently" ... "They are more cooperative 
than the ones I've been used to," remarks Halvor- 
son...A gloomy duckling chirps, "Not what I 
expected, but could be worse." Aren't we all bud- 
dy? 

A confused Prep describes her classmates as 
being a mixture of names, faces, and states" . . . 
One honest lad, who I'm sure will prefer to remain 
anonymous, puts his observation in one powerful, 
descriptive word ''Dumb!". . .Chapin may have the 
reason for this opinion — "Although they looked 
all m, they fired questions with much energy.". , . 
No one even anticipated or mentioned the pending 
arrival of the rest of us — how come? 

The Constitution guarantees freedom of speech 
and press. Otherwise, many valuable utterings 
would never taste ink. Read on: 

The Uppers (meaning the whole student body 
including the Freshmen) were seen to be "hug- 
ging each other like long-lost sisters," and "took a 
long time to sort out". . .we are eitner "too cold or 
too friendly," "a triple sophisticated, " and "a 
crazy bunch of fun-loving kids". . .Watson: "The 
Uppers rubbed my fur the wrong way — it was 
with effort that I refrained from scratching." We 
blush at the other descriptions and trust we've 
bettered ourselves since. 

Home Sweet Home — we write you wherever 
we roam. The Preps, most of them stoutly deny- 
ing suffering homesickness, write to "mom' ' as 
often as possible and at least once a week. Mary 
Ann Hughart, dimpled darling from the hills of 
West Virginia, explains: "I'm not homesick any- 
more, but I'm still schoolsick. In other words, I 
wants me Alma Mater." 

Baby of the class is Gloria Intermill, wiho will 
be "Sweet Sixteen" next year. The other infants 
range from 16 to 21, with only one girl insisting 
that her age was a deep, dark secret. 

Five preps insist that they are not "Drug Store 
Addicts." All the rest admit their weakness is a 
block away and also are in love with the A&W. 
Chapin explains she's always a third for a couple 
of girls, according to rules that Preps go in three 's. 
Best alibi we've heard yet — they must grow then 
in Missouri. 

Social life is okay by all the femmes, except 
Lucas who exclaims, "Why must there always be 
some wallflowers?". . .A few non-jitterbugs wish 
there were "more games — less prancing" .. .The 
men-folks wish the girls could be allowed to go 
off the Campus more often at night. 

The greenhorns learn that good and bad live 
side by side: "The East has too many slum dis- 
tricts, and is too crowded, definitely". . .The small- 
town hicks long for Midwestern farms and friend- 
ly people. The Westerners miss their snow-capped 
mountain. Hatten's conception of the East is that 
of the view from here to H Street. Small world 
you live in, Frances. 



^ 



The Hurdy Gurdy 

Nadine Nichols, '46 & John Randolph, '45 



ij 




Someone mentioned the 
"Comedy o f Errors" when 
Kirk patrick, our 4' 11" Califor- 
nian, remarked, "Well, cut my 
legs off and call me 'Shorty'." 
. . . Then there was the Prep. 
Chapin by name, who said men 
were like some women ' s 
clothes .. .hard to pick. 

The annual play given by the 
flHRHl J&SKm girls after the "Y" picnic went 
off with a bang and several 
murders. Hatch had the presence of mind to faint 
before the spooks got her. Hodock, the Flatfoot, 
was caught spying on a ship Beyond the Blue Hor- 
izon. If Hatten were only a Sultan, maybe Watson 
could make her debut as a hill-billy. Spooks Hal- 
vorson, Hughart, Ross, and Wharton lived virtual- 
ly up to their roles — but yours truly doesn't think 
the masquerade was necessary. Chapin modestly 
boasted about how the boys flirted with her when 
Coming Thru the Rye. 

Hughart says that all she learned at school 
didn't come in books. Could it be a certain Math 
teacher was doing outside work? 



Here today and gone tomorrow— —Yowell believes 
in boosting civilian morale, so she's going home 
Christmas to give us a vacation. Now, ain't you, 
Abigail? . . . If Depew tries to tell you she likes 
candy, don't believe her, or you'll go broke . . . 
Hamlin was going to write us a poem but says 
it didn't make sense — as if anyone expected it to. 
Taylor and Lucas are enjoying college in their 
own private way — not quite obvious as yet. Lately 
Huett 's head has been a size larger aue to a pulled 
tooth — but Schleiff doesn't seem to mind . . . No- 
ticed F. Parsons hula-hulaing in her sister's foot- 
steps? 

Ayers and Hensley are vying for "mo" when 
Stake.ly does the "eenie, meenie." 

If Kubis hadn't slipped in the mud Sadie Haw- 
kins' Day, the girls would be chasing him still, to 
hear him tell it. 

Mouton's explanation of his being short whereas 
the usual Texan is tall-plus is that his mother fed 
him popcorn instead Of corn, and he's been pop- 
ping around ever since. 

Note to Stifller: Cradle-robbing from Mr. 
Craig's brood is unnecessary when Gallaudet's full 
of fellows! 

The terrors of Sadie Haw- 
kins' Day came and went. The 
timid souls from College Hall 
are now greatly relieved and 
grateful that the horrible and 
distasteful ordeal Of being 
chased around the campus by 
those Amazonian Fowler Hall- 
ites is over. After all, who can 
blame them? Masculine vanity 
demands that the man capture 
the woman, not she him . . . The 
honor of being the most popular male on the 
Green must go to youthful Dee Kirkpatrick, who 
recently received the astounding total of twenty- 
tive letters in two days. His monopoly on letters 
cannot be disputed. Is it girls or what? The 
little gentleman is also known to possess a lovely 
photograph of Miss Shirley Temple. Could it be 
that he aspires for her hand?. . . .One of the cor- 
ners of "Ole Jim" was noticeaibly graced by Stiff y 
and a mysterious male. A surprising eyeful it 
was .... Morty, Norwood, and Jordan are reputed 
to be. casing the situation for the approval of a 
certain Case. . . .Newman can be seen hard at 
work trying to acquire a prodigious vocabulary. 
Has already resulted in an amazing composition 
for Miss Yoder, although not by any means an 
extraordinary one. . . .Clark is going around with 
his nose stuck sky-high as regards college femmes. 
Upon inquiring for the reason, one finds that our 
worthy hero cannot afford to fool with such tri- 
vialities as one finds here, especially when he has 
a girl back home. Nice to see such loyalty. . . . 
Kuby presented an awesome sight on Sadie Haw- 
kins' eve at the movie with his arms reaching far 
across another pair of shoulders. . . .Rumors have 
have it that "Rubber Legs" Mouton dances in his 
sleep. Sounds quite credible if you notice that he 
seems to dance in everything he does. 

Illllllllllllllllllll I illlllllllllllllillllllllllillll!! Ill I 



Reader's Dri-Jest 

Caroline Tillinghast, '44 





llllliillliil 

"The Plainsman," Alabama 
Polytechnic Institute, puts us 
on the inside track about the 
process of choosing GI volun-t 
teers instituted by an old First 
Sergeant at a certain reception 
camp. 

One day he had the whole 
company fall out, and asked 
all the college men to form a 
line. Then asked all the high 
school graduates to form an- 
other line. After he nad the men separated into 
two groups he said: 

"We are going to police up the ground around 
here. I want the college men to pick up the cigar- 
ette butts, the high school graduates to pick up 
the paper, and you other dumb bunnies stand 
around and learn something." 
ADA 
Did you hear about the near-sighted snake that 
married the rope? 
Mw: What lies east of Burma? 
Joe : Shave. 

ADA 
I sometimes think my morning rest 
More essential than a test; 
But when, my head seems muddied, 
1 sorta wish I had studied. 

Wilson Spectacles 
AoA 
Overheard at the Junior Prom: 

"Gee, you're a swell dancer! Did you take danc- 
ing lessons?' ' 

"No, but I took wrestling lessons." 
AOA 
He: That fellow out there playing center will be 
our 'ibest man' before tfhe season is over. 
She: Oh, dear, this is so sudden! 

Wesleyan Pharos 

ADA 
The thin man failed to help his wife onto the bus. 
"Egbert," she puffed, "you aren't as gallant 
as when I was a gal." 

"But Euthanesia, you aren't as bouyant as 
when I was a boy." 

The Hilltopper 



Campus Chatter j 

Betty- Jo Raines, '46 & Ralph White, '46 [ 




All the leaves are on the 
ground now, except a few that 
just won't., come down no mat- 
ter how hard the north wind 
I doth blow. Yet the campus is 
a delight, with the smoky smell 
I of autumn in the air and with 
H the leaves rustling beneath out- 
feet. 

My, but the "Sadie Hawkins 

Day" chase was a sight to see. 

There was much racing and 

chasing on the Green. The girls all got their men 

though, for that, night the Chapel was full of 

flushed, victorious females with their captives in 

tow, lor the movie show. 

Hope you all caught a glimpse of the visitors 
Roberta Hermann had November 9th. Her 
Hawaiian friend, Private Shigeo Warashina of the 
1 . S. Army, stopped op his way to New York 
from Camp Shelby, Mississippi, with five of his 
friends to see Roberta. These boys were five of 
the five hundred who enlisted from Hawaii. 

There are some peculiar sights on the campus 
nowadays. Noontime often ■ filnds the Astronomy 
class taking <a peep through the telescope at some- 
thing. They say it is the sun. Guess they must 
be sun-struck. 

Once more the basketball 
season has rolled around! The 
players are warming up for 
their first game, due pretty 
soon. It looks like a team and 
a half this year. We can hope 
tor as good results as last year. 

Katharine Cornells and 
Charles Boyers now prance 
about the stage in preparation 
for the play season. Good act- 
is bound to be revealed at 

the O. W. L. S. program and the Dramatics Club 
presentation, the former to be held on Thanks- 
giving eve, and the latter on December 10th. 




The Poet's Pack 

Contributions Made by the Student Body 



STOP, LOOK, LISTEN!!! What have we here? 
From the lowly Preparatory class have come these 
not-so-lowly expressions of thought! At last — 
from the desolate labyrinths of ignorance has 
come a feeble ray. of hope — 

PERFUME 

What is perfume? . 
Nothing, nothing, 
But pure water 
Plus rank odor. 

Something made in Gay Paree, 
Something sent across the sea, 
With just an odor — for what? 
Only to knock out you and me! 

— Mary Ann Hughart, P. C. 



WANDERER 



Ah, where do you go, my young man bold, 

With your frank blue eyes and your hair's new 

gold, 
And whence came you with the day's warm dawn 
And whence will you be when the day Is gone? 

You sang a song and the tune was light, 
Laughed a laugh 'with your blue eyes bright. 
But where do you go when the day Is done? 
You fade in the glow of the dying sun. 

— Nancy Wharton, P. C. 



THE THOUGHTS OF A PATIENT 

At last, night has come creeping in gloom; 
Outside posies in their garden bloom; 
Nearby are the grim and silent halls; 
Here my gaze meets only brownish walls. 

To forget this night I try to sleep . . . 
Alas, my power is but to weep. 
Oh! why is everything so glum? 
Why cannot assuaging sleep here come? 

My weak bed-mates aren't feeling fine, 
For like horses they also whine. 
Why must the night be long and drear 
When I wish daylight were near? 

Oh, my faithful nurse, come over here, 
Thy jessamine hands are soothing, dear. 
T know it is very late at night, 
But look at me, and pity my plight. 

At last! at last! those cerulean skies 
Glitter through into my sleepy eyes, 
Bringing dawn in its golden hue, 
In the glory of the sunlit blue. 

There in the distant horizon it hovers, 
While we sigh in peace in our covers. 

— Larry Newman, P. C. 



Wednesilu v ; Xovember 24, 1943 



The Buff and Blue 



PAGE THBKK. 



^Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllliilllilllilllllllliililllllllilililllliiiilj!,!, I Blues Show Excellent 



SPORT SLANTS 



by Lyle Wiltse 



Despite our failure to capture the Mason-Dixon cross country 
crown for a second successive year, Coach Sullivan has yet an addi- 
tional run in store for the Blues. The South Atlantic cross country 
meet is to be held in Baltimore on Thanksgiving Day, November 25. 
Sully is determined that the Blues shall participate in the collegiate 
division and make a good showing in the run if not to capture the 
grand prize itself. Participants in this meet will consist of any col- 
legiate or independent team that pays the entrance fee, hailing from 
any part of the middle and southern Atlantic Seaboard from the 
Mason-Dixon line downward, including the District of Columbia. 
Loyola College has been the undisputed holder of the South Atlantic 
grand prize for the past two years. In spite of our recent downfall, 
we shall carry on by sailing right in and shooting the works. Perhaps 
a little more zeal than usual will carry us through to the top peg of 
the score board . It would be nice to awaken some bright morning 
to rind the words GALLAUDET WINS SOUTH ATLANTIC INTER- 
COLLEGIATE TITLE blazoned in bold face type across the sports 
page of the local newssheets. Wishful thinking? 

Basketball practice is in full swing and "Old Jim" is once more 
shaking and creaking to the tune of rumbling feel after a long 
period of idleness. The squad is on the court each afternoon on 
week days from four o 'clock till well nigh six o'clock undergoing 
rigid workouts in passing and shooting. Training has been under 
way among rival quints for some time and they are going to assure 
us of some genuine up-and-at-'em games this season. Meanwhile, 
Coach Sullivan has been somewhat stumped as to what to do with 
the large number of basketball enthusiasts who are anxious to have 
a crack at the varsity team, but who are not. quite well gifted in the 
art to pass. However, since the material is too good to be allowed 
to remain idle, all who will not in. any way retard the progress of 
the team will have a chance to play on the Junior Varsity squad 
which has recently entered the Heurich League, a recreational 
league in the District of Columbia. They have a sumptious number 
of games on their schedule. Paul Baldridge, Sully's Assistant Phy- 
sical Education Director, will assume management of the outfit. This 
position, plus the captaincy of the varsity team will leave Baldy with 
quite a bit of work on his hands. 

The inaugural game bf the season will take place Friday, Decem- 
ber 3, against the Bridgewater College quint. Place: Eastern High 
School court. Time: Eight o'clock p.m. sharp. So come on, ye fans 
of long sitting and help. bolster the .fighting spirit of the Blues! 



Runde Makes Plea 

To make the Alumni Page more 
interesting the Alumni Editor re- 
quests most earnestly the cooper- 
ation of the graduates and former 
students in all sections of the 
United States and Canada. Send 
in items, giving class when poss- 
ible — items no matter how trival 
they may seem, for they surely 
must interest some one far away 
and out of contact with the doings 
of former friends of Kendall Green 
memory. It is desired that the 
Page should always be an Alumni 
Page in fact — not given to sec- 
tionalism or to the publicity of 
personal friends. What is wanted 
by readers is items of interest 
about former residents of the cam- 
pus regardless of likes or dislikes. 
News is new and the Alumni Ed- 
itor is supposed to be neutral in 
reporting what comes to his desk. 



THOMPSON S 
HARBER SHOP 

\ Orleans Place near Fla. Ave. 
Hair Cut As You Liko It 

50 cents 
Hours: 11 to 8 
9 to 9 Saturdays 



NORTHEAST 
CARD SHOP 


Jack's Meat Market 


GREETING CARDS 


922 7th St., N. E. 


Stationery Gifts 


Fancy Groceries, Fruit And 


Photo- Work 


Vegetables 
Beer and Wine 


651 H St., N. B. | 

I '- - -, J 


J. Greensteiu, Prop. 



C. C, Track Awards 

At a recent meeting of the Gal- 
laudet College Athletic Associa- 
tion-, it was decided to establish 
the Track and Cross Country 
teams under two separate depart- 
ments instead of combining them 
into one department as had pre- 
viously been done. Formerly an 
athlete who participated in both 
sports earned only one varsity 
letter, but according to the new 
plan a letter will be awarded for 
making it possible for the athletes 
to earn two letters. The Advisory 
Board nominates candidates for 
these awards and these nomina- 
tions are subject to the ratifica- 
tion of the Association. 

This Board of Advisors consists 
of seven members; two members 
of the faculty, chosen by the Fac- 
ulty as their representatives, two 
residents of the District of Col- 
umbia who are graduates of the 
College but are not members of 
the faculty, the Graduate Man- 
ager of Athletics, and the Presi- 
dent and Treasurer of the G.C. 
A. A. With such a wide variety 
of talent serving as advisors, it 
seems certain that all decisions 
of the Board will be fair to all 
concerned. 



Sportsmanship 



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GALLAUDET 



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The following verbatim article 
appeared in the sports section of 
a recent issue of the Loyola Col- 
lege student publication. The 
Greyhound: 

"Foremost on Loyola's sched- 
ules this year will probably .be 
Gallaudet, defending champions 
in both cross country and basket- 
bull. The fellows there despite 
their handicap show a great deal 
of fight, and this more than make;, 
up lor any lack of skill that they 
may have. Under their two 
Coaches, Sullivan and McClure, 
they have established relations 
with Loyola which should be held 
up a.s an example. They always 
assure us of a good battle, with 
a lot of tough competition but 
after the game is over they show 
us as much courtesy as could be 
expected from any team. This 
relationship is typical of the kind 
which should exist between all 
members of the conference an<^ 
would assure us of a real game 
without the hatred that does exist 
between some schools." 

In return we acknowledge 
Loyola's well meant attitude with 
warm feelings of friendship. We 
shall continue to uphold the ideals 
of fair play, good sportsman- 
ship and amity. At the same 
time, we agree unanimously that 
the relationship as expressed is 
exactly what should exist between 
all members of the conference. 
There is nothing better than a 
clean game well and fairly played, 
with just and jealousy eliminated. 
V — ■ 

Ladles Have Their Day 

Vociferous wails from the vicin- 
ity of Fowler Hall gave testi- 
mony to swollen joints, strained 
muscles, and bruised flesh ac- 
quired on Sadie Hawkins' Day 
November 6, from chasing Cross 
Country. Collegites, who tripping 
all around the lawn space alloted 
to them, acted somewhat like gild- 
ed birds in a cage. Our female fe- 
lines streaked and tore around in 
a most unbecoming manner, thus 
giving the males no end of enjoy- 
ing of horror. Often disarmed by 
the meek appearance of a female 
bystander, the Collegites would 
prance nearby in a most overbear- 
ing manner only to be tagged and 
handed over to the deserving and 
despairing damsel chasing him, 
who minus all dignity, was thank- 
ful. The women must have as- 
sumed monstrous proportions in 
their vain flailing when one man 
got so desperate as to walk a- 
round on stilts. But methinks 
those little monsters were meek 
enough at the horror show. "The 
Last Warning," presented in Cha- 
pel Hall that night to which the 
young ladies escorted their catch. 

Don't throw your mouth into 
high gear until you're sure your 
brain is turning over. 

V- 

Everything comes to him who 
orders hash. 



Compliments 
of the 

Curb Cafe 

714 H. St., N. E. 



Girls' Athletics Then 



L is interesting to go back and 
note the changes which have taken 
place in the field of sports and in 
gym classes at Gallaudet since the 
early 1900's. It is surprising to 
find that women's sports have 
changed much more than men's 
sports through the years. In those 
old days, instead of having a, 
variety of sports such as we have 
today, about the only main sport 
women enjoyed was basketball. 
Also, instead of playing basket- 
ball among themselves as we play 
most sports today, they played 
against other colleges. After each 
game there was a tea for the 
players. 

The competitive sports which 
the men enjoyed in those days 
were much the same in nature as 
those they enjoy today, changing 
only in dress and manner of play- 
ing. 

There are a few interesting 
things to note in connection with 
gym classes in the early 1900's. 
One is that ail classes, both men 
and women, were held in Old Jim. 
j- owler Hall as it stands today, 
had not yet been built, so the 
women had no gym of their own. 
Another is that the instructor for 
both men and women in physical 
education was a man, Mr. Adams. 

In looking back we also dis- 
cover that intramural sports are 
comparatively new. Such activi- 
ties had not yet begun during 
the time immediately following 
the turn of the century, so all 
sports were intercollegiate. To- 
day, the men still have many 
intercollegiate sports, but intra- 
murals are becoming more im- 
portant than before. The women 
today have fewer intercollegiate 
sports than in the old days. How- 
ever this does not mean that they 
are no longer interested in such 
sports. 

.: __V — 

Buy Your Tickets Now 

The basketball schedule for Gal- 
laudet's quintet has not as yet 
been completed, but we expect to 
have seven or eight, possibly more 
home games with local College aid' 
University squads, and several 
with non-conference members such 
as the powerful Quantico Marine 
Base basketeers, the Fort Meade 
Army team, and others. 

Below are Used the home games 
to be held in December, the place 
and the exact time: 

Friday, December 3 — Eastern 
High School court, 8. 00 p. m. 

Wednesday, December 8 — Fort 
.Meade, Tech. High School court, 
7:45 p. m. - '•■ ■ 

Season tickets for Kendall 
Greeners and outsiders will be 
available on December 2nd. The 
ticket agent will be Basketball 
Manager, Robert Panara, and his 
assistants. Tickets may be pur- 
chased at the gate for three dol- 
lars. The admission price for 
children under twelve years of 
age will be twenty-five cents, and 
for non-ticket holders seventy-five 
cents per game. 

There will be no admission 
charge to the game with the Fort 
Meade group on December 8th — 
so come one, come all, and enjoy 
one blood-tingling game free of 
charge. 

Remember, the season ticket 
sells for $3.00. It is good 
through-out the season for all 
home games. 



Gaffins 


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Boys' Wear 


R BY 




Men's and 








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Dashing Victory 
For Blue Bisons 



Organization Directory 



Most of the College personnel 
turned out to see the "double 
threat" fall short of its challenge 
as the greatly improved Gallaudet 
sprinters squelched the Loyola 
College and Catholic University 
teams with a decisive twenty-nine 
point margin on the home field 
Saturday morning, November 13. 

The day dawned cold and 
dreary with a gusty wind whists 
ling in from the west around the 
College buildings. Nevertheless, 
all three teams turned up with 
good spirit to compete in the 
three-way field meet. 

When the gun cracked through 
the shrilling wind, the three 
teams set off at a steady lope 
across the Green. It was difficult 
to see which team was in the 
lead, but as they neared the two 
mile point, Hines was - forging 
well ahead for Gallaudet, follow-, 
cd by Stanley and Goodwin, who 
were some one hundred feet be- 
hind. There were seven of the 
Blues in the lead at the two mile 
point and they held their posi- 
tions easily while neither of the 
opposing teams were able to make 
advances to break up the forma- 
tion. Gallaudet came through on 
top, tallying ten points by plac- 
ing runners in the first four posi- 
tions. Loyola finished second with 
thirty-nine points, while C. U. 
forfeited to finish. 
Summary: (place winners only — - 
J to 15.) 

Hines, G, 16:39; Stanley,. G, 17 : 
0,3.; Goodwin, G, .17:05 Fishier, 
G , 1 7 : 1 4 ; Marshall , G, 17:15; 
Kubis, G, .17:16; Norwood, G, 17: 
32; Pazek, Loyola, 17:40; Mc- 
Kenny, Loyola, 17:45; Thaler, 
Loyola, 18:16; Labbe, C.U.,' 18: 
28; Rayer, Loyola, 18:52; Shir- 
mek, Loyola, 18:52; Murts, C.U., 
19:09; McGolrick, C.tj".', 19:24. 

_ — ; — v — — -— ,- ' '.'. ' 

Y. W.C.A. Program 
Based on Religion 

A short program based on the 
book, ."This.. Believing World" by 
Lewis Browne, was given by mem- 
bers of the Y. W. C. A. in the 
girls' reading room Friday even- 
ing, Novenvber 12. The program, 
arranged by Arlene Stecker., chair- 
i mn. was as follows: 

"How ; it All Began'.', . . .Part I, 
by C. Tillinghast, '44 and Part II, 
by. J. Smith, '46 

"Judaism" ... ..by J. Burg, '44 
Myer. '47 ,- 

'.'Confucianism" . . . . : ; >. 

by B. Myer, '47 
"Buddhism and Hinduism". . . . 

by M. Hughes, '46 

"Mohammedanism" ..... ......;. 

by N. Nichols, '46 

"Christianity" 

, by E. Wood. '47 
Poem — "Each in His Own Ton- 
gue", by W. H. Carruth 

by M. Fischer, '44 

Prayer , . . 

by A. Minor, '47 
-V — — 

Archery Results 

Since Old Man Winter is getting 
very near, it seems that the arch- 
ery practice tournament for the 
term is almost at an end. In look- 
ing over the present results, we 
see much promise among many of 
th Junior and Senior women who 



ART 



MATERIALS « ~Z* 



Quality 

Sine* 
1865 

MUTH 

710 H™ 



A. S. F. D. 

Pres. — Leonard Meyer, '44 
V. P. Donald Padden, '45 
Sec. — Donald Wilkinson, '4 5 
Treas. — Henry Krostoski, '45 
Ass't Treas.— Frank Sladek, '4 6 



Dramatic Club 

Pres.-^Paul Baldridge, '4 4 
V. P. — Leander Moore, '44 
Sec. — Mervin Garretson, '4 7 
Treas.- Ralph W r hite, '46 



(i. C. A. A. 

Pres. — Charles Pollock, '44 
1st V. P. -Donald Padden, 4T» 
2nd V. P. — Henry Krostoski, '45 
Secy. — Lyle Wiltse, '46 
Treas. Leander Moore, '44 
Ass'f Treas. -Marvin Marshall, 4: 



(i. C. W. A. A. 

Pres.- — Julia Burg, '44 • ■•■-•■••■. 
V. P. — Celia Burg, '45 
Sec— Betty Jo Raines, '4 6 
Treas. -Earline Becker, '47 

■■-•■-. ■. r,: , ■■ 

Kappa Gumma 

Grand Rajah — Bro. Baldridge,, '.4,4 
Kamoos — Bro. Padden, '45 
Yahdheed— Biro. Meyer, .'44... 
ivlu'khtar — Bro. Krostoski, ,'45 ,..; 



Literary Society 

Pres. — Ralph White, '46 
V. P. — Warren Black well, '46 '-' 
Sec. — Mervin Garretson, '47 
Treas. — Marvin Marshall, '47'" 
_ , _ ___ .. __. 

Movie Club 

Pres. — -Meyer Plotitsky; "'44;. • - : 
V. P. — Harold Steinman; '46 : / .. 
Sec. — -Byron Hunziker, '46 
Treas. — Marvin Marshall, '4 7 

Q. W. Lt. S., '" 

Pres.^—Caroline Tillinghast, 44 
V.,.;P.— Agnes: Carr, '45; ,...,.' 
Sec- Jean Smith,. ,'46 .■ ,.■■, .^ ,, 
Treas.— Mar jorie Case, '46 
Librarian— Frances Lupo Ki '4 4 

Photography Club ;n 

Pres. — Bertt Lependorf, '44 
Sec.-Treas.— Leonard Meyer, '44 
General" Mgt.- W Blackwell, 4»V 

-•V:-*-. :<:•• : . : ri.lnr*$ $'i 

Reading Kooju ; , . :<;•.*. 

Chairman-^— Charles i Pollock; '44 
Meyer Plotitsky; ;':44: : 
Donald Padden; : '4& . ;:.:: . :•■. 

Sec. -Treas. -^Jack Hensley. ; ■'.4f> • 
Warren BlackwelL- '46 .: .: ■■ :: i .. . 
James Drake, -'46 r:r-b:::.: 



Y. M. S. C. 

Pres- —Ralph White, ' ' 4.6 . ... 
V. P. — rJack Hensley, '4i).. '],'_ 
Sec.TTT- Mervin. Garretson,/ '4 7 .. 
Treas.- — Thomas Fishier, '4 7. 

Y. W. C. A. ■". 

Pres. — -Frances Lupo; '44 ■ : ' :! - 
V. P. — Ciarhelen' Wilkitts, '45 - : 
Sec. — Nadine Nichols, '46 " '-■'-■■-■ 
Treas. — Aleatha Barnes, '46 
Chairman— Arlene Stecker, '44 
Ass't Chairman— ^Betty Stark,. -''45 



took paft in it. Taking into con- 
sideration the little time: given 
them to work up to high scores, 
the women have done exceptional- 
ly well. '■■■■■: ; -A.- : 
The highest score shot in one 
round was 280 shot by Julia Burg, 
Senior. Second highest was 277, 
shot by Clarice Petrick, Senior. 
Third was 270, shot by Ciarhelen 
Wilkins, Junior; and fourth w&s 
254, shot by Celia Burg, Junior. 
Other girls who are making 
scores in the 200's are Carlie 
Todd, Betty Stark, Frances Lupo, 
and Arlene Stecker. Many others, 
who have not yet reached the 200 
mark, are rapidly improving and 
we hope they will pass the mark 
when archery is taken up agairfr 
in the spring. 



CASSON STUDIO 



<(& Photographers of the 1942 Buff and, Blue ^ 



1305 Conn. Avenue N. W. 



DEcatiu- 1333 



2M.GE.F0 UK 



The Butt and Blue 



Wednesday, November 24, 1943 



NEWS OF THE ALUMNI 



By \\ mi.-l<i S. Runde, '01 



Alpha W. Patterson, '14, hav- 
ing improved in health took a 
machine operating job in a factory 
on the Oakland waterfront and 
then went on a two weeks' vaca- 
tion at Long Qeach where he 
took sun baths and watched the 
rolling waves as they rose and 
fell, crashing on the beach. Al- 
pha is now back at his old stand 
as master of the printing plant at 
the California School. He has held 
the same position for twenty 
years. 

__ — V 

Wesley Mayhew, N-'36, has 
left his teaching position at thei 
California School and at present 
is in San Rafael with his wife.; 
He is working for the govern-j 
ment in a manufacturing plant. 1 
At Berkeley he was regarded as 
a coming teacher who some day 
may be a leader in the profession. 

V 

Marshall Hester, N-'32, went to 
his old home in Mississippi soon 
after the California School closed 
for the summer. He returned with 
his aged mother. Marshall is head 
of the Advanced Department at 
his school. 

V ■ — — 

Dr. George Morris McClure, 
Jr., son of Dr. George Morris Mc- 
Clure, Hon. '96, is with a Naval 
Aviation Unit in Florida. The son, 
wife and three children used to 
live 'with McClure, Senior, in 
Danville, Kentucky. Now the 
place seems empty and lonely for 
the grandparents whose house had 
always been full up with lively 
children. 

V ■ — 

.Nicholas Braunagel, '27, has 1 
purchased one of the most modern 
cottages in the City of Devils 
Lake, North Dakota. Snapshots 
received by the Alumni Editor 
show Nick togged out in winter 
woolens shoveling snow off his 
sidewalk, but he assures us that 
this summer he had a wonderful 
garden including some of the gor- 
geous geraniums that we sent 
him. Nick's folks own and oper- 
ate a large wheat and flax farm 
in North Dakota. This summer 
they had a bumper crop. Now 
back at his teaching and editing 
job after helping with the harvest, 
Nick goes hunting with his 12 
gauge shotgun. Nor is he lonely 
for Gallaudet company — the fol- 
lowing now reside in Devils Lake 
besides Nick: Wendell Haley, '20, 
Leslie Hhinant, '35, Leona Otto- 
way Hinnant, '36, Thomas Sheri- 
dan, '93, Ernest G. Langenberg, 
"24, Fern Newton Langenberg, 
'27, Olga Marie Anderson, '12, 
Rose Coriale, '40, and Arthur P. 
Buchanan, Hon. '29. Mr. Bu- 
chanan's son, the Rev. John Bu- 
cihanan, is a captain in the army 
and recently cabled that he ar- 
rived safely in Europe some- 
where. 

V 

In the passing into the Grea.t 
Beyond of Martin M. Taylor, '92, 
the deaf world lost another lead- 
er of prominence. Mr. Taylor had 
been in a Michigan hospital for 
six months. Surviving him are the 
wife, two sons and three daugh- 
ters. After finishing college he 
taught in North Dakota, Arkansas 
and Louisiana. He was an expert 
printer and at times set type for 
different newspapers and printing 
houses. In later years he became 
a layreader to the deaf of the 
Episcopal faith. 

V 

A letter from Glasgow, Scot- 
land, contains the information 
that Angus C. Mclnnes is still 
teaching at the Glasgow School 
for the Deaf which has been 
turned over to the armed forces 
and the school moved into a safer 
place in the country. Angus was 
a former student at Gallaudet 
about thirty years ago. While in 
Scotland in the fall of 1938 the 
Alumni Editor met him. He 
looked well, prosperous and hap- 



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FELDMAN'S 

The Store For Distinctive Jewelry 

Watches Diamond* Silverware 

(Repairing of All Kinds) 



py, and asked many questions 
about the college and friends of 
the long ago. 

V 

Arthur Ovist, a former student 
of Gallaudet passed away in a 
sanatorium in Minnesota October 
8. After attending college for a 
few years he was appointed librar- 
ian of the Minnesota School, or 
rather Assistant to the regular 
librarian, Louis C. Truck, '70. 
He was soon advanced to the posi- 
tion of Classroom teacher, where 
he made good. In 1940 he was 
stricken with lung trouble and 
went to a sanatorium. While con- 
fined he wrote letters to friends — 
letters that provoked great admir- 
ation for his fortitude, cheerful- 
ness and life eternal. His pass- 
ing is deeply regretted by all who 
knew and loved him. The flag at 
the school was lowered to half- 
mast in honor of this fine young 
man. 

V 

The Editor of the Companion, 
Wesley Lauritsen, in an editorial, 
paid tribute to Arthur in part as 
follows: 

"It is difficult to undersand 
why so promising a young man as 
Arthur Ovist should be taken 
from us. He was universally liked 
and we have often had pupils tell 
us that they wish Mr. Ovist might 
return to teach them. 

Activities outside of the class- 
room always interested Mr. Ovist 
and he was active as a Boy Scout 
leader, as a Hi-Y Club leader, and 
in the promotion of dramatics. 

Several months before his final 
summons, Mr. Ovist realized tnat 
he might be called from his 
earthly life and gave instructions 
that his books be presented to the 
library of the Minnesota School 
for the Deaf. His wishes in this 
respect have been carried out." 
V 

Margaret Hanberg, '03, long a 
teacher in the Arkansas School 
for the Deaf, retired last June 
and went to live with her folks 
in Canada. Says the Companion: 
"She thought she had been put 
on the shelf for good, so went up 
to her people in Canada. The 
West Virginia School asked her 
to teach for a year, and she was 
glad to return to the states." 
_ — y 

Julia Dodd, '2 2, returned to 
her Portland, Oregon, home re- 
cently after having spent several 
years in a sanatorium for tuber- 
culosis patients. Julia attended 
the North Dakota School where 
she was a general favorite be- 
cause of her pleasing ways and 
enthusiasm in helping with the 
housework whenever there was a 
scarcity of help. We hope tha£ 
Julia, fine soul, will fully recover 
her precious health. 

V 

Thomas Ulmer, '34, and wife 
(Georgiana Krepal, '37) spent 
most of their summer helping 
around the Oregon School. They 
also did some night Work in a 
Salem Cannery. Tom is a teacher 
and a poet, you know, but he 
also knows the money value that 
rewards the well trained hands. 
V 

Troy Hill, an ex., is the Texas 
correspon dent for the Silent 
Broadcaster, of Los Angeles. In 
Texas he is known for his speed 
In manipulating the keyboard of 
a typewriter. He can do this with 
his eyes fixed on copy without 
ever looking at the keys. Some 
feat! 

__V 

On September 26, Dr. and Mrs. 
Thomas Francis Fox, '83, were 
hosts to a number of their Gal- 
laudet friends at their lovely 



1 1 1 1 1 ! 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 ii 1 1 1 1 1 1 r r u 

LITTLE | 

9th St., South ctf G = 

Hearing aids for most seats! E 

First Run & Revivals = 
See Daily Papers for Programs S 



Caldwell, N. J., home. (Caldwell 
by the way, is called the Denver 
of the East because of its com- 
manding elevation). Motion pic- 
tures of the couple were taken on 
the lawn, and another movie 
when the guests were at table. 
Bertha Block Barnes, '96, was 
caught by the camera conversing 
with the genial doctor. Bertha 
was one of the first two young 
women Dr. Fox prepared for Gal- 
laudet the other being the late 
Martin Stafford, '95. Those 
years at college were years to be 
remembered. It was at that time 
that the College publication, the 
Butt' and Blu<* was started, the 
OWLS was formed and the Nor- 
mal Department set in motion. 
The late beloved Dr. Charles Rus- 
sell Ely was a member of this 
first Normal Class. As all know, 
he later became professor of 
Chemistry at the college. 

The instructor of printing at 
the Maryland School for the Deaf, 
Harold J. Domich, '40, was seen 
passing around the traditional 
cigars one day last summer. It's 
a son who will carry on. Provi- 
dence willing, as Harold J. Do- 
mich, Jr. 

V 

Wilson Grabill, '34, still works 
for Uncle Sam in the District of 
of Columbia and has not, as was 
suspected, folded his tent and de» 
parted, like the Arab, to parts un- 
known. His friends think the war 
fever keeps his glued to his 
assigned task. 

V 

Carl Hiken, '30, left his posi- 
tion in St. Louis, Missouri to 
accept a better opening in Wash- 
ington, D. C, in the General Ac- 
counting Office. 

— _ _v 

Probably the livest wire among 
the deaf in the District of Colum- 
bia is Henry Ho Iter, '30. His 
friends speak of him as being full 
of pep, and that when they want 
new recruits for any cause they 
just have to sic Henry after potent 
possibilities and he never fails to 
ibring them into the fold. He is 
a go-getter every blessed inch of 
his manly stature! 

V 

Rex Lowman, '40, has left the 
teaching profession and it is re- 
ported that he is now buried in 
the cold figures of the Census 
Bureau. Too bad that such a man 
of fine tastes should be lost to 
the children. 

V 

Philadelphia lost a citizen, Alan 
Lynch, '18, wife and two children 
when they folded up and settled 
in crowded Washington. Reason — 
better pay and better outlook. 
Alan, realizing his responsibility 
as a family man, never over- 
looks a chance to bring home to 
hungry mouths larger and larger 
slabs of the traditional bacon. 
— V 

Ellen Pearson Stewart, '17, en- 
tertained a neice in her Washing- 
ton, D. C, home last summer and 
took a needed change by heading 
west to Nebraska. Back in Wash- 
ington she now holds down her 
old place in the Kendall School. 
Hubby Ray, '99, managed to go 
fishing now and then to relax 
from sustained concentration on 
cold figuring in the Census Bu- 
reau. 

V 

William Theodore Griffing, '24, 
after working in a war plant for 
some months has returned to the 
classroom in Sulphur, Oklahoma, 
where he evidently ,'belongs. We 
hope he will again take up his 



former position on the Oklaho- 
man. When he had charge his 
columns. "The Melting Pot" gave 
the publication added interest. 
We were sorry to learn that Ted 
recently lost his aged mother and 
that his daughter, Shammon, suf- 
fered a ruptured appendix and 
had been in the hospital for some 
time. In the loss of his mother 
Ted and many deaf friends espe- 
cially will experience the feeling 
of loneliness that envelopes one 
who has suffered the passing of 
a close friend of pure and noble 
character. 

_ v 

The following alumni are en- 
gaged in the missionary work 
among the deaf of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church: The Reverends 
Guilbert C. Braddock, '18; Otto 
B. Berg, '38; Robert C. Fletcher, 
26; George F. Flick, '03; Homer 
E. Grace, '11; Herbert C. Merrill, 
96; William M. Lange, '32; J. 
Stanley Light, '16; Henry J. Pul- 
ver, 17; and Arthur O. Steide- 
mann, '02. 

. _v 

On October 8, through October 
10, the Conference of Church 
Workers Among the Deaf met in 
Columbus, Ohio, under the lead- 
ership of the Rev. George Alemo, 
who extended the visiting clergy- 
men a hearty welcome. The re- 
sponse was delivered by the Rev. 
Dr. Herbert C. Merrill. The Rev. 
Henry J. Pulver gave a stirring 
address which led to lively dis- 
cussion among the delegates. The 
sign language was declared to be 
the best medium by which reli^ 
gious education can be imparted 
to the deaf, and that signs have' 
a proper place in schools for the 
deaf for the purpose of addressT 
ing large assemblies. The Con- 
ference expressed concern o v e i 
the tendency today to admit hard T 
of-hearing children to our various 
schools for the deaf thus tending 
to crowd out or neglect stone 
deaf children for whom th4 
schools were originally establish- 
ed. The Conference decided to 
set up a Committee to inquire in- 
to ways and means of establish- 
ing religious classes in all Schools 
for the Deaf. Other important 
topics were discussed and it was 
the unanimous opinion of all at- 
tending the Conference that it 
was the most successful of all 
such gatherings that have been 
staged in the history of Church 
workers among the silent people. 
V 

Esther Paulson, a former stu- 
dent of Gallaudet has gone to the 
Vancouver, Washington, School 
from the Mackay School for the 
Protestant Deaf in Montreal, Can- 
ada. Her Canadian friends great- 
ly miss her. Esther was born in, 
the United States. Her parents 
moved to Saskatchewan when she 
was a girl and there she grew up. 
Now the family lives in Portland, 
Oregon. 

V- — — ■ 

Walter P. Bell, ex-'09, who 
makes his home in Canada, went 
to Chicago last summer to attend 
the Frat Conclave. There for the 
first time in years he met many 
old College friends and together 
they re-lived the days on Kendall 
Green. While in the Windy City 



Mrs. Geo. L. Sutton 

Mrs. L. Sutton Bailey 

ATlantic 1153 

PEOPLES 

FLOWER SHOP 

"Say It With Flowers" 

900 H Street, N. E. 



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his sister threw several water- 
melon parties because of Walters 
fondness for the luscious fruit. 
He has reared three children aU 
of whom are married. His elder 
son is in the United States Navy 
holding a top-ranking Commis- 
sion. 

V 

Robert, son of Thure Axel Wal- 
ter Lindstrom, '06 and wife 
(Susie Dickson, '07), is first pilot 
or a Boeing Flying Fortress. Re- 
cently he flew from Kearney 
Field, Nebraska to Salem, Ore- 
gon, to visit the parental home. 
Thure is teaching again this year 
and also is instructor of printing 
and associate editor of the Ore- 
gon Outlook. 

V — 

Olaf Tollefson, '37, and wife, 
(Frances May, '40) have return- 
ed to the Georgia School after 
teaching a year in the Florida 
School. Last summer Frances 
enjoyed the surf bathing at St. 
Augustine while Olaf worked in 
a barge yard and then went to 
North Dakota to help his father 
on the farm. 

.V 

The deaf of the United States 
presented the American Red 
Cross with three Clubmobiles. 
The money for the vehicles was 
collected by the National Assoc- 
iation o f the Deaf, largely 
through the untiring efforts of 
President Tom L. Anderson, '12, 
and Secretary-Treasurer Byron B. 
Burnes, '2 6. They will be used 
for entertainment purposes for 
soldiers in far places overseas. 

Football has returned to the 
Iowa School and Nathan Lahn, 
'25, is coach. Nathan lost his 
aged father soon after the Iowa 
School started the fall session. 
Mr. Lahn was a retired merchant 
of Wichita, Kansas. 

v 

Eugene McConnell, '24, was 
Council Bluffs Division, N.F.S.D. 
delegate to the Chicago Conclave. 
After that with his family he va- 
cationed in Minnesota. 

_V 

The Deaf Carolinian will here- 
after be published only once a 
month, instead of twice a month, 
"in order to help win the war in 
the quickest time possible". The 
publication is edited by Odie W. 
Underbill, '08, and George K. 
Brown, '34. Odie also teaches 
mathematics in the upper grades, 
while George is boss of the boys 
who are learning the "art pre- 
servative of all arts". 

Uriel C. Jones, '24, is now an 
alumnus of the University of 
Tennessee, post-graduate division, 
by virtue of his having recently 
received the degree of Master of 



Science. Since leaving Gallaudet 
Uriel has been connected success- 
ively with the Idaho, Mississippi, 
and Tennessee School for the 
Deaf. At present he is with the 
later school as printing instructor 
and editor of the Observer. It is 
a fine thing for Gallaudet grad- 
uates to continue their studies at 
hearing institutions of learning, 
especially those who are in pro- 
fessions. Quite a number of Gal- 
laudet Alumni have won high- 
er degrees in colleges and univer- 
sities in the different states. It 
speaks highly for the efficiency 
Of the undergraduate instruction 
at Gallaudet. The college is proud 
of Uriel and all those who have 
added lustre, in one way or other, 
to their Alma Mater. 

V 

Flavio Romero, ex-'44, was 
married last spring to Miss Freda 
Haffner of Indiana. Flavio has a 
position in a defense plant in 
Indiana. He attended the New 
Mexico School for the" Deaf where 
he prepared for college. 

V 

Thomas Sheridan, '94, has a 
splendid article in the October 
Banner entitled: "Our Short 
Past". In it Tom reveals some 
little known facts about Dakota 
Territory and the founding of the 
North and South Dakota Schools 
for the Deaf. 

V 

In the same issue of the Ban- 
ner Albert Berg, '8 6 and '95, has 
an article on "Random Thoughts 
on Education of the Deaf". In it 
he tells some poignant truths con- 
cerning the training of deaf chil* 
dren. He pays tribute to the deaf 
editors of the l.p.f. as follows: 
"The deaf press, and more or less 
that Of the hearing, has and has 
had many Ibrilliant deaf editors 
and writer, nearly all . . . being 
Gallaudet College products". 
About the sign language this vet- 
eran of the schoolroom, now in 
the shadowy evening of life — 
without any motive other than 
cold reality as burned into his 
soul from impartial observation 
through the years of his toil — 
gives out the following unalloyed 
pronouncement concerning that 
medium of social intercourse 
among the deaf to which thought- 
less and inexperienced teachers 
and others take cruel and un- 
reasonable antagonism: 

"The beautiful language of 
signs, conceived by the Abbe de V 
Epee through Divine inspiration, 
brought to us from France by 
Laurent Clerc and its purity pre- 
served by the Gallaudets, Peets, 
and their contemporaries— may 
it be perpetuated!" 



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Woodward & Lothrop 

11 & F St., N. W. 



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Woodward and Lothrop has the coat se- 
lected by the brightest in the class, the 
newly bright Chesterfield — in colors that 
shout of autumn and slash the whiteness 
of winter. Of 100% wool in colors that 
inspire the cheerleader when the day is 
ending before that last all-important 
play. Junior Misses' Sizes $35 



W&L — Junior Misses' Apparel, Fourth Floor 



New Year's Party 
December 31 



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Basketball at 




J. H. 1 . — Jan. 28 





VOLUME LII, NUMBER 5 



GALLAUDET COLLEGE, KENDALL GREEN, WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Thursday, December 16. 1943 



Two Plays Instead of One in 
Annual O. W. L S. Program 



"Wagging Tongues" and 
"Not a Man in the House" 



The O.W.L.S. presented their 
annual public program of 2 one- 
act plays, "Wagging Tongues," 
and "Not a Man in the House/' 
in Chapel Hall, Wednesday eve- 
ning, November 2 4, at eight 
o'clock. 

Altnough time for rehearsals 
had been limited, the girls put 
both comedies over effectively. 
The first one on the program, 
"Wagging Tongues," by Mabel 
Conkiin Allyn, showed what hap- 
pens in a small town when one 
decides to break away from all 
precedents set by the "worthies" 
of the town. Grace Harkness 
(Frances Todd, '44) supplied the 
earnest spark, and the wet blan- 
kets who smothered her unmerci- 
fully (albeit unsuccessfully) were 
Mrs. Mehitable Potter (Malvine 
Fischer, '44), Mrs. Campbell 
(Margaret Clack, '46), and Mrs. 
Hattie Hector (Clarhelen Wil- 
kins, '45). Defending Grace from 
the start were her guardian, 
Susan Dorkin (Clarice Petrick, 
'44) and Clara Potter, sympathe- 
tic daughter o± the religious, 
dutiful Mrs. Potter (Majorie 
Case, '46). Amateurs showing 
their colors were Clarhelen Wil- 
kins, '45, Margaret Clack, '46, 
and Virgie Bourgeois, '44. 

As the title implied, the play 
was more dialogue than action, 
but to quote Professor Frederick 
H. Hughes, "The clear signing 
and success in showing emotion 
uiuiiga fixMct!. BnplGuoxtfQ ni... • 

up for the loss." 

Certainly up-to-date was the 
second play, "Not a Man in the 
House," by S. Jennie Smith, but 
it had nothing to do with the 
war. The big reason here was 
Mrs. Bings (Mary Sladek, '44). 
With her trust placed in one per- 
son — namely, Mrs. Bings — she is 
"monarch of all she surveys." Th« 
unlucky members of her house- 
hold were Aunt Belinda (Clarice 
Petrick, '44) who admires her 
sister's acts of independence but 
often longs for a touch of mas- 
culinity in the house, Miss Lucy 
(Agnes Carr, '45) who hopes one 
John Wright will come to her 
rescue before she is confirmed to 
spinsterhood, Kate (Frances 
Lupo, '44), the simple Irish 
maid whose second cousin is on 
the police force, and Jessie Ray 
(Malvine Fischer, '44) who 
comes for a visit and falls into 
the clutches of her well-meaning 



(See OWLS PROGRAM, Page 3) 
V 

O.W.L.S. to Dedicate 
Alcove to E. M. Nelson 



The week of January eighth 
marks the fifty-second anniversary 
of the founding of the O.W.L.S. 
Accordingly, a birthday party 
will be held Saturday evening, 
January 8, in Fowler Hall. All 
alumnae members are invited. 

During this party, the dedica- 
tion of the E. M. Nelson Alcove 
will take place. It will be indeed 
a proper memorial to Professor 
Edith M. Nelson, who for many 
years was a devoted O. W. L. S. 
member and advisor, and wfto 
was our College Librarian. It is 
believed that her devotion will be 
commemorated best by books. 
Plans for this tribute to our 
faithful friend were begun last 
spring and were taken up again 
this fall with renewed enthusiasm. 
At present, the librarian of the 
sorority has three books donated 
by Miss Nina Van Oss, *43, which 
are the first contribution. 

The O.W.L.S. sincerely hopes 
the collection of books will grow 
rapidly in tribute to one who 
sincerely loved books. 



Co-Eds Donate 
Blood to Red Cross 



Holiday Activity 
Schedule Full 

Y\ iih Hi advent of the Thanks- 
giving holidays, the Gallaudetians 
began a gala wee*\-end packed 
with activity. There was not a 
dull moment from the time classes 
closed at 4 P. M. Wednesday, 
November 24, until they reopened 
at 8 A. M. the following .Monday. 

The vacation activities began 
with the b. W. L. S. play in 
( Impel Hull on' Wednesday eve- 
ning. At JLO A. M. Thursday the 
entire student body assembled in 
Chapel Hail, where Head Senior 
i>ieyer olle'-ed a prayer of thanks. 
Following • the Chapel services, 
everyone (locked to Hotchkiss 
field to witness the annual molly- 
coddle too* ball game between the 
uppers ana the lowers. It was a 
rather cri-p day, and everyone 
seemed to be in the best of 
spirits, therefore, it is not sur- 
prising that enormous appetites 
accompanied the spectators and 
players back to the dining room 
where a turkey dinner w a s 
.-erved. ''urkey and dressing, 
mashed potatoes and gravy cran- 
berries ami celery, and all the 
other irintmings that go with a 
real home- cooked Thanksgiving 
.cast wen on hand in abundance. 
In the midst of the meal, word 
arrived ol Gallaudet's victory in 
the South Atlantic Intercollegiate 
Cross Country Meet. This caused 
a brief pause for cheering and 
back-slap Jing; then renewed at- 

disappearing turkeys. Much credit 
for planning and preparing the 
Thanksgiving dinner goes to Mr. 
Johnson and our two cooks. They 
have our sincere thanks. 

Thursday evening the student 
body and many outsiders again 
gathered in Chapel Hall where 
a movie program was presented 
under the auspices of the Movie 
Club. The remainder of the vaca- 
tion was taken up by the annual 
tug-o-war between the Preps and 
the Frosh, the mollycoddle soccer 
game on Friday morning, a pro- 
gram of games and dances in the 
Chapel Friday evening, the intra- 
mural cross country meet Satur- 
day morning, and finally, a bowl- 
ing party Saturday evening. 

The students feel that they can 
honestly say that this Thanks- 
giving vacation has been one of 
the most enjoyable that the 
students on Kendall Green have 
witnessed for a number of years, 
and they wish to extend their 
sincere thanks to those individu- 
als who made it so. 

Demonstration Given 
By J. Hall in Chapel 

At a regular Chapel Assembly 
Sunday evening. November 21, 
Professor Jonathan Hall presented 
the faculty members and students 
of the college with an unusual 
educational lecture entitled, 
"Fluorescence." Professor Hall 
began his talk by projecting the 
colors of the spectrum onto a 
white background, explaining how 
one color gradually blends into 
another, leaving no specific line, 
until purple or ultra-violet light 
is reached. 

Proceeding with the main sub- 
ject, he showed fluorescence of a 
pertain kind by directing an ultra- 
violet lamp at the object after the 
lights had been turned off. Prof. 
Hall went on to show the distinc- 
tion between fluorescence and 
phosphorescence. 

The speaker concluded his dem- 
onstration-lecture by tracing 
"Good Night" on a newspaper in 
luminous paint and directing the 
ultra-violet lamp on the lettering 
for all to see. 



Answering the earnest plea of 
the American Red Cross for more 
blood for our fighting men, eight 
patriotic co-eds filed into the 
Acacia Building facing the Cap- 
itol on Tuesday afternoon, No- 
.i m her 30th, to donate a pint of 
blood each. Some of the.se young 
women had donated once before, 
and for the rest it was the first 
experience. They were: Earline 
Pecker. '4 7; .Margaret Clack, '46; 
.Mary Cuscaden, '47; Frances 
Hatten, P.C.; Frances Lupo, '44; 
Mary Fiances .Miller, '47; Ger- 
trude Slattery, '4 6; and Clarhelen 
\ i 1 k ins, '45. 

A new group of co-eds will do 
their share sometime before the 
Christmas vacation starts. All 
appointments for the college 
women with the Red Cross Blood 
Donor Service are arranged by 
Dean Elizabeth Peet. 



Peet— 'On Being 
An Audience' 



Widow of Dr. Ely 
Passes Away 

In the death of Mrs. Louise C. 
Ely, wife of Dr. Charles R. Ely. 
Saturday, November 27, Gallaudet 
Coll .tie lost a friend. 

Mrs. Ely had been connected 
with Kendall Green in many 
ways and had done many acts of 
kindnesses which shall not be 
forgotten. Her husband, the late 
Pr. Charles R. Ely, was Vice~ 
President of Gallaudet College 
and Professor of Chemistry for 
many years. Surviving them are 
three daughters, two of whom 
live in Washington, and on in 
Boston. 

Funeral . services were held at 
the Hines Funeral Home in the 
District Tuesday, November 30. 
Pallbearers were Professor Her- 
bert Day, Dr. Percival Hall, Pro- 
cessors Harley D. Drake, Irving 
S. Fusfeld. Frederick H. Hughes, 
and Head Senior Leonard Meyer. 
Mrs. Ely's resting place is in Fort 
Lincoln Cemetery. 

V 



Seven Seniors' Biographies 
To Appear in Who's Who 



Book Week Plays 
Meet with Success 



The fifth regular lecture in the 
Orientation Course, under the 
direction of Professor Hughes, 
was given in Chapel Hall, Thurs- 
day evening. November 18. Dr. 
Elizabeth Peet chose as her topic 
the subject, "On Being An Au- 
dience." 

Dr. Peet discussed the respon- 
sibilities of the audience in help- 
ing to make a success of whatever 
is portrayed or acted on the stage. 
"The excellence of a lecture can 
■ . ■■ i .. ^ i-- ■ 

squeaky noises, and lolling among 
the audience. Fsually, one who 
does not behave properly in an 
audience or gives vent to his feel- 
ings while among other people 
is simply ill-bred," she stated. 

Changing her topic, Dr. Peet 
then concentrated on describing 
and illustrating the origins 'of 
some of our common signs. She 
strensed the importance of know- 
in -v and' understanding the why 
and wherefore of our signs in 
order that the beauty of the sign 
language may become apparent. 



Books Contributed 
To College Library 

Following an old custom be- 

ifun by the late Edith M. Nelson, 

College Librarian, the Kendall 

fxreen Book Club has presented 

he following books as a gift to 

he College Library. 

i tie books are now on the 

I shelves: Whit Burnett, "This Is 

My Pest;" James Cozzens. "The 

.iust and the Unjust;" Marion 

>. Hargrove. "See Here, Private 

Cup and the Sword;" W. M. 
Kiplinger, "Washington Is Like 
That"; Dorothy Macardle, ••The 
Uninvited"; Helen Maclnnes 
"Assignment in Brittany" Rob- 
ert Nathan. "The Sea-Gull Cry;" 
Helen Reilly, "Name Your Poi- 
son"; Anna Seghers, 'The Sev- 
enth Cross"; Hartzell Spence, 
"Get Thee Behind Me"; Hendrik 
Wilhelm Van Loon. "Van Loon's 
Lives"; Anna .Mary Wells, "A 
Talent for Murder;'' Franz Wer- 
fel, "Song of Bernadette;" W. L. 
White, "They Were Expendable." 



Climaxing some weeks of prep- 
aration, the Library Science 
classes presented their annual 
Book Week program in Chapel 
Hall on November 19. .Mrs. 
Thomas Kline, the College Librar- 
ian, was in charge of the program, 
which depicted scenes from several 
popular books known to every 
oungster, and which was given 
for the benefit of pupils of Ken- 
dall School and their friends and 
parents. A large number of the 
college students and members of 
the faculty was also present. 

For the benefit of those hearing 
people who were present, Mrs 
Kline interpreted the various dia- 
logues. Leander Moore, '44, Frank 
Sladek, '46, Leslie Massey, P. C, 
and Lyle Morte-nsen, P. C, did a 
wonderful job on constructing and 
arranging the scenery for the 
various acts. The realistic make- 
up of the actors was largely due 
to the efforts of Julia Burg, '44. 
Miss Burg was also responsible 
or the design appearing on the 
cover of the program booklets, 
which were prepared and mimeo- 
graphed by Frances Todd and her- 
self. 

Tne various playlets, their 
I i rectors, and the actors are given 
in the following list: 

Tom Sawyer — Directed by Jean 
Smith, '46. 

Tom Sawyer. Thomas Rippe, 
'46; Joe. Thomas Fishier, '47; 
..en. jvoy S'penry, 4b; iJiiiy, i- red 
Drake, '46; Aunt Polly, Chris- 
Lei Erdmann, '46. 

F.paminondas — Directed by Mary 

Faux. '45, and Ralph White, '46. 

Epaminondas, Nadine Nichols, 

'46; .Mammy, Mary Sladek, '44. 

King Midas— -Directed by Ar- 

lene Stecker, '44. 

King Midas. Leander Moore, 
'4 4; Marigold. June King, '44; 
Fairy. Frances Lupo, '44. 

Snow White & the Seven Dwarfs 
— 'Directed by Frances Lupo 

(See, BOOK WEEK. Page 3) 



'Thomas H. Gallaudet'' Liberty Tanker Launched 






The Liberty tanker, "Thomas H. Gallaudet," 
after it roared down the ways on October 21, 
at the Calship yards in Wilmington, California. 
This ship is named after one of the foremost 
educators of the deaf. Many deaf workers are 
reported to be employed at the Calship yards, 
and have helped build this ship. 



Mrs. Pearl Buck, noted author, who acted as 
sponsor at the launching ceremony, said, "This 
is a lucky ship built by loving hands and named 
for a great soul. I am sure this ship, too, has 
a great, soul and that it will ride all storms as 
Gallaudet did. I would rather sponsor this than 
any ship in the world." 



Gallaudet to be Included for 
Sixth Time in Publication 



Among those students who 
will be listed in the 1943-44 is- 
sue of WHO'S WHO AMONG 
STUDENTS IN AxMERICAN UNI- 
VERSITIES AND COLLEGES are 
seven Senior men and women 
from Gallaudet College. They are 
as follows: Julia Burg, Malvine 
Fischer, Caroline K. Tillinghast, 
Carlie F. Todd, Paul F. Bald- 
ridge, Thomas O. Berg, and 
Leonard J. Meyer. 

This publication is published 
through the cooperation of over 
600 American universities and 
colleges. It is the only means of 
national recognition for graduates, 
which is devoid of politics, fees, 
and dues. Several students from 
accredited colleges are selected 
yearly by an unprejudiced com- 
mittee for their biographies to ap- 
pear in this publication. These 
books are placed in the hands of 
hundreds of companies and few 
who annually recruit outstanding 
students for employment. 

The purpose of W T HO'S WHO is 
to serve as an incentive for stu- 
dents to get the most out of their 
college careers; as a means of 
compensation to students for w r hat 
they have already done; as a rec- 
ommendation to the business 
world; and as a standard of 
measurement for students. 

The requirements set for those 
-indents to be listed in WHO'S 
WHO AMONG STUDENTS IN 
AMEPICAN' FXIVFPSTTTF.S AMD 
COLLEGES are character, a high 
scholastic record, and outstanding 
extra-curricular achievements. 

Miss Burg is President of the 
Gallaudet College Women's Ath- 
letic Association, was Vice-Presi- 
dent of same, and was Class Presi- 
dent for one term her Freshman 
year. Miss Fischer, Editor-in-Chief 
of The Buff and Blue, is co-editor 
of the yearbook, The Tower 
Clock, and was Secretary of the 
O.W.L.S. Miss Tillinghast is Pres- 
ident of the O.W.L.S., was Vice- 
President of same, and was Class 
President for one term her 



See, WHO'S WHO, Page 3) 
V 



Debate^Attraction 
At|Lit.^ Meeting 

Something new in the line of 
social activities this year was in- 
troduced in Chapel Hall on the 
evening of November 19. Owing 
to some unforeseen difficulties, 
the Literary Society was unable 
o present the program as planned' 
therefore it was decided to hold 
an impromptu debate. Any mem- 
ber of the student body was al- 
lowed to participate, and the en- 
tire audience served as judges. 
Under the leadership of Ralph 
White, President of the Literary 
Society, various members of the 
group took their turns on the 
stage and argued piro and con on 
the subject: "Should We Have 
More Mixed Suppers?" Quite a 
few logical arguments were 
given on both sides of the issue. 
The debaters waged a fast and 
furious battle of words for a 
little over an hour, and then a 
vote was taken up to decide 
which side was victorious. Since 
the issue seemed to be rather 
evenly divided, it was decided to 
call it a draw and to continue to 
hold mixed suppers every three 
weeks, as had originally been 
planned. 

This innovation seemed to meet 
with instantaneous approval 
among the student body, so it 
may look forward to many more 
interesting debates on questions of 
common interest to all the 
students. 



PAGE TWO 



The Buff and Blue 



Thursday, December 16, 1943 



The Buff and Blue 



Published once a month during October, De- 
cern oer, January, February and twice a month 
during November, March, April and May. Entered 
at the Post Office at Washington as second-class 
mail matter. 

Subscription Price $2.00 per year 

(Payable in advance) 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Malvine Fischer, '44 

LITERARY EDITOR Bertt Lependorf, '4 4 

NEWS EDITOR Byron Hunziker, '46 

SPORTS EDITOR Lyle A. Wiltse, '4 6 

ASS'T SPORTS ED Clarhelen Wilkins, '45 

ALUMNI EDITOR Winfield S. Runde, '01 

ASSOCIATES 

Robert Panara, '45 Earl Elkins, '46 

Christel Erdmann, '46 

REPORTERS and COLUMNISTS 

Caroline Tillinghast, '44 Carlie Todd, '44 
John Randolph, '45 Calvin George, '45 

Betty- Jo Raines, '4 6 Jean Smith, '4 6 

Ralph White, '46 Nadiae Nichols, '46 

Earline Becker, '47 Thomas Fishier, '47 

Mervin Garretson, '4 7 

BUSINESS MANAGER Calv-n George, '4 5 

ASS'T BUSINESS MANAGER . Donald Padden, '4 5 
CIRCULATION MANAGER . Harold Steinman, '4 6 
ADVERTISING MANAGER . . Charles Pollock, '4 4 

ASS'T ADV. MANAGERS . . Frank Sladek, '46 

Wayne Schlieff, P. C. 

PRINTERS 
Leonard J. Meyer, '4 4, FOREMAN 
William Brightwell, '4 6 Jasou Ammons, '47 
Bertt Lependorf, '44 Wayne Furlong, '46 

Charles Pollock, '44 

PROOFREADER Eugene Schick, '47 



WAR DRIVES, THEN AND NOW 

We wish to call the attention of the reader to 
the part played by the National Association of 
the Deaf in the recent Victory Fund Drive. 
Through the untiring efforts of members and 
friends of the N. A. D. and through the hearty 
cooperation of the deaf, a sum was raised, large 
enough to buy three "Clubmobiles'" for active 
.service for the iVmerican Red Cross. The com 
mittee in charge consisted of Secretary-Treasur- 
er B. B. Burnes and his many assistants, all of 
whom did a wonderful job. Mr. Burnes com- 
municated with officials of the War Department, 
the U. S. 0., the Red Cross, and other organiza- 
tions relative to the disposition of the Victory 
Fund. The A. F. P. H. news release on one of 
these "'Clubmobiles" printed in the previous 
issue of The Buff and Blue did not stress enough 
the fact that the N. A .D. was instrumental in 
the raising of the fund. 

Let us go back twenty -five years to the first 
World War and see how the deaf of America 
contributed to the cause. They started out to 
raise the sum required for the purchase of on 
ambulance, but ended with enough for three 
ambulances, which were '"presented to France 
by the deaf people of the United States of 
America in appreciation of the teachings and 
services to them of the Abbe de 1' Epee, the Abbe 
Sicard, and Laurent Clerc." Among those who 
supported the drive were Dr. Percival Hall. 
Prof. H. D. Drake, and Prof. F. H. Hughes of 
Gallaudet College. The motives behind the 
drives, the contributing party, and the nature 
of the contributions were all the same for both 
World Wars. 



Chemistry and the Charles R. Ely Scholarship 
prize, and in the giving of so many books to the 
Gallaudet College Library. Mrs. Ely's interests, 
however, were not limited to Gallaudet College 
but extended to her church and to other activi- 
ties. 

For an individual whose early contact with 
the deaf started because of an interest in her 
husband's work, Mrs, Ely established for her- 
self remarkably high esteem in the hearts of 
tin 1 students of Gallaudet College with whom 
•she was associated almost all of her adult life. 

—P. J). 

JilllllllPllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllfllllllllllllllllllllW !! 

| As We See It J 

Jean Smith, '46 

ii!l1it!lllPIII!l!l!]||||l!llllllll!lllllllllll!lllllllllllllllllllllllllll!lllllllllllll!ll!ll!IIIIIW III I t 





The recent introduction of a 
popular orchestra — Johnny 
Flannagan and his buddies — 
put new life into the Junior 
Prom. The boys appeared to 
be rather doubtful as to 
whether we really enjoyed 
their "sweet hot". This natu- 
rally leads us to echo: "Did 
we?" 

Even the few students here 
who don't have a yen for 
dancing and those who aren't able to enjoy music, 
agree on one certain thing — without an orchestra, 
the Prom would have been reduced to a mere 
week-end dance. How come? Why are there arti- 
ficial fireplaces in public dining-rooms which boast 
a complete heating system? And expensive, gold- 
framed portraits hanging in theatre lobbies, which 
the managers aren't obliged Co decorate as an art 
gallery? John Doe likes atmosphere! 

Then, a large percentage of our students can 
hear well enough to follow the music and really 
"get in the groove." The faculty, of course, ap- 
preciates rollicking rhythm from such orchestras. 
The rest of us depend on the "feel" of the music 
through the floor. It is hard for a normal person 
to understand this. A visitor, seeing our Radiola 
in the Chapel, is compelled to ask if we dance with 
our shoes off. Without intended slam to wartime 
shoes, we insist we are wearing our number eight- 
eens to nothingness, to say nothing of the floor! 

Most people with no or impaired hearing prefer 
peppy music with accompaniment of the drum. 
.Music that is so fast that we must dance jerkily 
doesn't appeal to us. Of course this is from a gener- 
al viewpoint, since preferences are an individual 
matter. The dislike of one deaf person for swing 
music does not necessarily mean that the deaf, as 
a whole, consider it their pet peeve. As always, we 
have struggled against the tendency of the public 
to judge "the deaf" by the reaction of a single 
deaf person. 

In our midst, we find few exceptionally good 
dancers. This is true of any group people taken 
under observation. But the average student dances 
fairly well. 

We are not as familiar with popular singers 
and current songs as normal people. Therefore, 
we are not hard to please; you won't find us yel- 
ling for "Pistol-Packin' Mama'' when the band 
wants to relax with "Embraceable You." None of 
us are "Dorsey-crazy" or "Swoonatra-looney." 

Here's to bands like Johnny's who really turn 
on the heat! 



Yowell replied that it was funny how everyone 
thought she was from Kentucky and Furlong from 
New Jersey. 

Behold! Quiet and enchancingly offish Todd, in 
a new role! She starred in the O. W. L. S. play 
as a reckless, heartless critter. Bravo, Carlie, and 
keep the barriers down. 

Thanksgiving came around 
with all its blessings and a 
little good weather, too. That 
day the College Hallites went 
the pace that kills. Rudely 
aroused out of their peaceful 
slumber at the early hour of 
10 A. M., they staggered over 
to Hotchkiss Field for a 
battle of wits in mollycoddle 
football. After this ordeal, 
our heroes cleaned up in the 
brief space of just one half hour, and were ready 
for the great annual gorging. And lo! all those 
seemingly gigantic turkeys soon went the way of 
all turkeys, manners or no manners. One would 
expect one to take a respite from strenuous acti- 
vity for the day after such a heavy feast, but not 
so those worthy gentlemen who stepped out with 
their favorite ladies that afternoon. After a short 
supper, they hastened over to the Chapel to enjoy 
the movies or be with their girl friends; we don't 
know which. After all this was over, the gentlemen 
called it a day and answered the call of the sand- 
man .... 

Lovelorn little George is still scouting around 
for another "bundle of heaven" after having had 
eleven heartbreaks straight in the past few years. 
Somewhat discouragd, but wiser, he wants some- 
thing like this: a young lady with fair altitude, 
aptitude, and a determination to stick it out. . . . 

"Dark horse" Shrout came from out of nowhere 
to take over Stakley from those much discussed 
rivals, "Wee Willie" and Hensley. Henslop 
wasn't caught napping, though, for he is still de- 
pending on his love-by-mail method, this time 
with a young Miss in Mississippi .... 

Holcomb and Wharton seem to be getting along 
as nicely as can be . . . . Special note to any ladies 
of prey existing in Fowler Hall: White no longer 
has any obligations to a certain femme, so here's 
your chance. . . .Fishier and Nichols seem a little 
tor* friendly for just friendship. 

.. IIIUII 1iliillllllilllllllllllllllllili|!lllll|llli!lll!i|lll!l;|i|iil!i!!l! l li^l!ll!liir ! i: , ]||!|!! !illll!ll|l||lilllllllt!l!ll!llll!ll]lll!ll II ' fj 

j Reader's Dri-Jest | 

Caroline Tillinghast, '44 











The Hurdy Gurdy 

Nadine Nichols, '46 & John Randolph, '45 



Vi; 



dJ 




MRS. LOUISE C. ELY 

Although few of the students in college at 
present remember Mrs. Louise C. Ely when she 
lived on the Green, still, many of the alumni 
will recall with pleasure the annual supper 
parties Dr. and Mrs. Ely gave each year for 
the members of the Senior class, their gracious- 
ness in chaperoning college parties and their ut- 
most interest in the welfare of the deaf. For 
over forty years Mrs. Ely had been interested 
in Kendall Green and all of its activities. Even 
after she moved away a few years ago, Mrs. Ely 
continued making her yearly contribution to 
the Washington Community Chest through col- 
lectors on Kendall Green. Tt was Mrs. Ely who 
was so vitally interested in arranging for the 
establishment of the Charles R. Ely prize 



W. Ayers is a "chip of the 
old block" when it comes to 
story-telling. His favorite in- 
troduction is "When I was a 
little girl. ..." 

Smart guy this Fishier; he 
who takes two pencils to the 
Junior Prom, and nonchalant- 
ly forgets his ticket .... The 
band at the Junior Prom had 
a nice piece af competition . 
The competition wore a cute 

little sailor cap, and was all at sea right in Ole 
Jim. 

It does a person good to know that not just 
everyone is a slacker. Baldy informed us one 
night that he was a man of well-meaning, im- 
mensely interested in progress, good policies, etc. 
Wonder how F. D. R. holds his office with men 
like him around. 

Some one has gone poet-idiotic over Stecker. 
A series of anonymous poems from a Prince 
Charming have been flowing steadily through 
Fowler Hall's sugar-bedecked portals. We hope 
the poor guy will soon recover his normal state 
of mind. 

In a recent movie, a most noticeable racket be- 
gan in row eleven. Some boy, scuffling his feet or 
shifting his chair, everyone surmised. Just between 
us, Smiffy admits it was her conscience. (Wiscon- 
sin, please note! ) 

When Yo<well of N. J. and Furlong of Ky. were 
seen strolling on the campus, someone remarked, 
"N. J. morale plus Ky. technique." To -wkteh 



Just a P. S. from "The 
Postscript" of William and 
Mary College. The nervous 
wife of the mayor of her first 
launching asked, "How hard 
do I have to hit it to knock it 
into the water?" 

AnA 
Who is the Math student 
who calls his girl Geometry 
because she is so plain and 
solid? Tower 

ADA 
I took her to a night club; 
I took her to a show; 
I took her almost anywhere a boy and 

girl should go. 
1 took her to a swell dance; 
I took her to tea; 
Then suddenly I realized, 
That she was taking me. 

Tower 

ADA 
Pet Peeves 

People who say they haven't studied for a 
test and come out with a B plus or better. 

People who make spectacles of themselves 
because they can't wait to be served at the table. 

People who say the war is their first thought 
and pass by the stamp booth. 

People who say Gallaudet is a "dead beat" 
and don't open their eyes or contribute to the 
activities. 

People who mooch cigarettes. 

People who say they'll come to a meeting 
and don't. Grr! 

ADA 
Professor Kline: What can you tell me about 
nitrates? 

White: Well, er ... ah ... well, all I know is 
that night rates are a lot cheaper than day rates. 

The Tattler 
ADA 
Dictionary Delirium 
Angora — To be mad. 
Committee — A body that keeps minutes and 

wastes hours. 
Debasement — The room under your house. 
Innocent bystander — One who is minding his own 

business at the wrong time and place. 
Pole cat — A small animal to be killed with a 

pole — the longer the better. 
Shrubbery — Kind of berry used in making shrub- 
bery shortcake. 
Unabridged dictionary — A complete dictionary 

with nothing left in it. 
ADA 

When Oliver left his clothes scattered on the 
floor, very disorderly, his mother inquired; 

"Who didn't hang up his clothes when he 
went to bed?" A muffled voice from under the 
covers murmured, "Adam". 

The C. H. S. Chatter 



gtll lllullllllllli 

j Campus Chatter I 

Betty-Jo Raines, '46 & Ralph White, '46 j 

flfflll lllllilllliil . iiiiiii lilllllllPllliilllI 

The old Chapel Tower chimed without delay 
When we awoke Thanksgiving Day, 
And there on the campus, all glitteimg and white, 
Was proof Jack Frost had come last night. 

Thanksgiving brought the 
first frost of the year to our 
campus, making the ground 
white in the early morning 
sunlight. 

Thanksgiving vacation also 
brought fun and activities 
galore. First was the molly- 
coddle football game with the 
uppers "bringing home the 
bacon." Then there were the 
Prep-Frosh Tug-O-War and 
the mollycoddle cross country run. 

Quite a few students spent the holiday away 
from the campus, some at home, and others visit- 
ing with their friends. Among them were Hester 
and Frances Parsons, '47 and P. C, who traveled 
to Gap, Penn., with Ruby Miller, '47, to visit Miss 
Miller's brother and sister-in-law. 

Irene Quidas, '47, invited Gertrude Slattery, '45, 
to stay with her at her home in Preston, Md. 

Julia and Celia Burg, '44 and '45, were paid a 
surprise visit by their mother, who came to Wash- 
ington on business during the Thanksgiving week- 
end. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ludwig Fischer helped their 
daughter, Malvine Fischer, '44, to celebrate 
Thanksgiving Day. They spent the week-end 
sightseeing in Washington. 

Abigail Yowfll, P. C, also spent Thanksgiving 
with her parents, who came to Washington. 
Last month incidents: 

Arnold Daulton, '4 3, came all the way from 
Akron for a visit. Joining him here was his 
brother, Leslie, who is in the armed ser- 
vices. At present, Arnold is studying Chemistry at 
the University of Akron. 

Wayne SchleUf, P. C, rated a visit from his kid 
brother, Warrer, who was home on furlough from 
the Navy. He stopped over for a few, days with 
Wayne. 

Upon word that his father 
had passed away, Ernest 
Schuster, '47, hurried home to 
New York. He is now back 
among us. We wish to extend 
to him our sincere sympathy. 
The parents of Rudolph 
Hines, '4 7, came to see him 
run in the Mason-Dixon Con- 
ference Meet on the Green, on 
November 20th. 

We now sense the presence 
of Old Man Winter who is trying his utmost to 
barge in like a lion. Ah me! "What is so rare 
as a day in June?" 




The Poet's Pack 

Contributions Made by the Student Body 



LITTLE LEAVES 

Little leaves shifting with the wind, 
Like ideas coming together, 

Forming nations, 

Founding empires; 
Like empires tottering, 
Scatter with the wind again. 

-Keith Laaige, '47 

BOSOM FRIEND 

A book, a treasured book! 

What else can take your place? 
When time is heavy, days are dull, 

I see your shining face. 

Up there upon the shelf, 

Arranged in countless rows 
Are tales of folklore, knights of old, 

History that comes and goes. 

I finger reverently 

Your pages "With great care, 
For fear that, marring one of them, 

You'd be no longer there. 

The hours I spend with you, 

Are filled with untold joy, 
In some serene, dear cherished nook 

Your worth and help employ. 

A friend, a treasured friend! 

Come wind, rain, storm, calm sea; 
Through every stressing phase of life, 

You'll mean the world to me. 

— Christel Erdmann, '46 

JINGLE JANGLE JINGLE 

(Frosh Class Version) 

We've got nerves that jingle jangle jingle 
From studying our history all night long 
And it's hard to thinkle thankle thinkle, 
So we get all our history answers wrong. 
Oh Doc ol' pal, ol' pal, oP pal, 
Tho' you may know your history 
That is why we fail 'n' fail! 
Oh. we've got nerves that jingle jangle jingle 
So we go ridin' merrily along! 

— Babs Myer and Rnby Miller, '47 



Thursday, December 16, 1943 



The Buff and Blue 



PAGE THREE 



lllllllliiiliiiih 



SPORT SLANTS 



by Lyle Wiltse 



The cross country season ended up with a grand flourish, the 
Gallaudet team retaining partial glory as a result of the recent vic- 
tory in the South Atlantic Conference meet. Hence Ye Sports Ed 
will bid farewell to this sport, with a few words by way of con- 
clusion. The team was somewhat crestfallen by the minimum af 
competition offered, and so, the meet was practically an intramural 
affair at that. Loyola strived hard, though, being the defending 
champs. 

And now, let us talk about basketball. The boys did some fancy 
skipping the other night with Bridgewater. For once we didn't see 
Sully tearing at his hair. Leastwise, not so much. Things clicked 
smoothly for the Blues with the exception of the first quarter when 
the opposing quint started to score ahead. But Baldy and Padden's 
uncanny passing and break throughs, plus Holcoaib s fiery close 
shots worked wonders in turning the tide. Let us not forget Schleiff 
and Leitson. These newcomers to the squad performed excellently 
and cooperated to the degree that counts. With yet more practice 
they should pack super power. The Bridgewater boys doubtless 
suffered keen disappointment at their defeat, it being the second 
loss in a row for them. The night before they had lost to American 
University 3 6-41. The entire group of active Gallaudet subs, name- 
ly, Samples, Witczak, Massey, Stanley, and Broz were on the court 
for a few minutes during the last part of the second quarter. They 
played well, but their defense tactics were not so well applied, thus 
allowing Bridgewater to gain a bit. Then Baldy and the rest stepped 
in and soon remedied that with a few well-placed shots. The Blues' 
morale was fine. Why shouldn't it have been with a whole mob of 
the fairer sex cheering 'em en from the grandstand seats? Let's hope 
they keep on making good showings like they did that night. (Both 
the girls and the Blues.) 



Gallaudet's novice glovesters came home Friday night, December 
3. with stirring tales of their exploits in the ring. The three boys 
who fought that night were Tommy Rippe, 160; Robert Clark, 147; 
Johnny Murphy, 135. Clark and Murphy were stretched out on the 
mat in short order. Both boys fought valiantly. Rippe kept slug- 
ging away at his opponent and won by decision. Just once he was 
on the verge of falling from a sharp right jab to the temple, but held 
on till he regained control of himself. All three of these boys fought 
with a miniumum of training. Rippe will meet another tough op- 
ponent soon by way of elimination. All of them will participate in 
the A. A. U. tourney in March. Good slugging, fellows. 



Boys Show Prowess 
During Holidays 



By way of entertainments 
during the Thanksgiving Holi- 
days, a game of mollycoddle foot- 
ball and a game of mollycoddle 
soccer were played on Hotchkiss 
Field in the forenoons of two suc- 
cessive days, November 25 and 26, 
respectively. Both games were a 
big attraction, being played be- 
tween teams which were in no 
way connected with varsity sports 
all participants being "green" 
hands in the business. 

The first same, mollycoddle 
football, took place on Thanks- 
giving Day between the combined 
Senior-Junior forces and the joint 
^oph-Frosh-Prep forces, the two 
teams (bearing respective ftitles/ 
Redskins and Bears. The Red- 
skins seemed to have the upper 
hand as athletes, squelching the 



THOMPSON 'S 
BARBER SHOP 

Orleans Place near Fla. Ave. 
Hair Cut As You Like It 

50 cents 
Hours: 11 to 8 
9 to 9 Saturdays 



NORTHEAST 


CARD SHOP 


OBBBTINO CABD8 


Stationery Gifts 


Photo-Work 


651 H St., N. B. 
v — =y 



Bears 13-0 that morning. The 
four quarters lasted fifteen min- 
utes each with ten-minute rest 
intervals between. Consequently, 
water was in great demand, keep- 
ing the water boy constantly on 
the run. 

The soccer game was played 
between the same opponents with 
the same timing between quar- 
ters as previously stated. This 
was rather a good joust, both 
sides having plenty of drive, but 
so well matched against the other 
that the score remained stationary 
throughout the play, 0-0. The 
crowd roared, and tried all sorts 
of tricks to encourage their re- 
spective sides onward, but to no 
avail. The fourth quarter ended 
with the score 0-0 as before. It 
was during the final quarter that 
the Redskins made two beautiful 
kicks only to miss the goal, much 
to their chagrin. 

Both games were highly en- 
joyed by everyone in attendance. 

V — . 

BOOK WEEK 

(Continued from page 1) 

Snow White, Arleine Stecker, 
'44; Prince Charming, Paul Bald- 
ridge, '44; The Wicked Queen, 
Caroline Tillinghast. '44; King, 
Wayne Furlong, '46; Servant, 
Herbert Goodwin, P.C.; Woods- 
man, Leslie Massey, P.C. 

The seven Dwarfs: 



Jack's Meat Market 

922 7th St., N. B. 

Fancy Groceries, Fruit And 

Vegetables 

Beer and Wine 

J. Greenstein, Prop. 






Illllllinililimillllllllilllll!!!"!!!!! 



|!"!!HM|i!iHin 



GALLAUDET 



PHARMACY! 



• Phone Atlantic 8888 • 
1000 Florida Ave. N. E. - Washington. D. C. 

■l«M*llll»MIIIIIIUIU«W 



First Basketball 
Game of Season 

Gallaudet's stampeding Blue 
Bisons inaugurated their 1943-44 
basketball season Friday night, 
December 3, with an impressive 
victory over Captain Houff's col- 
orful Bridgewater College quint, 
outpointing those worthies to the 
tune of 38-28. The event took 
place on the spacious Roosevelt 
High School floor, rented by the 
Blues for the occasion. 

As a preliminary to the main 
game, the D.C. Silents, led by 
Captain Hopkins, played an eye 
opener with the College Junior 
Varsity squad, defeating the Jay- 
vees 19-17 as the score see-sawed 
up. It was a rousing game and a 
fitting preliminary. 

The Rlues paraded out on the 
floor followed by a din of cheer- 
ing. Right after the opening 
whistle, the two teams scored 
points almost simultaneously, and 
from then on, it was nip and tuck. 
They were well matched, both 
possessing smooth passing ability, 
but the Blues invariably turned 
out to have a powerful defensive 
factor and good long shots. Roy 
Holcomb and Captain Baldridge 
scored 16 and 14 points respec- 
tively. Wayne "Tiny" Schleiff and 
Lawrence Leitson displayed hot 
foot-work as did "Dapper" Don 
Padden, always in close coopera- 
tion with Baldridge. The first 
half of the game ended with the 
Blues in the lead by a bare one 
point margin, 14-13. The battle 
to retain the lead really started 
then. The teams roared back and 
forth across the court, with Gal- 
laudet always managing to keep 
slightly ahead of its opponents. 
With but one second to go, Baldy 
nade a short flip which sunk the 
>all home, ending the game. 
SUMMARY: 
■allaudet 





FG 


FT 


TP 


Holcomb 


8 





16 


Leitson 


1 


1 


3 


Schleiff 











Baldridge 


li 


o 


14 


Padden 


•) 


1 


5 


Totals— 


17 


4 


38 


Bridgewater 










FG 


FT 


TP 


Houff 


8 


3 


19 


Jamison 


3 


1 


7 


Flora 


1 





2 


Mitchell 











Rieley 











Totals— 


12 


i 


28 



Doc. Nadine Nichols, '46; Grum- 
py. Eileen Ridpath, '47; Happy, 
Ruth Depew, P. C; Bashful, 
Aleatha Barnes, '4 6; Sleepy, Mar- 
garet Clack, '46; Sneezy, Linette 
Freret, '4 7; Dopey. Dee Kirkpat- 
rick. P.C. 

The Courtship of Miles Stand- 
ish — Directed by Arlene Stecker. 
'44. 

Miles Standish, Frank Sladek, 
'46; John Alden, Ralph White, 
'46; Priscilla, Betty Jo Raines, 
'46. 

King Alfred and the Cakes — 
Directed by Ralph White, '46. 

King Alfred, Jack Hensley, 
'4 5; The Old Woman, Frances 
Lupo, '44; Courtier, Ralph 
White, '46. 



Compliments 
of the 

Curb Cafe 

714 H. St., X. E. 



New Schedule for Co-eds j Preps Condemned 



Organization Directory 



In Physical Education 

A new schedule of activities for 
the co-eds in physical education 
classes has been arranged for the 
winter season. Two new features 
of the schedule are square danc- 
ing and intramural volleyball. A 
square dance group is meeting 
every Tuesday evening in the Old 
Jim. This group is made up of the 
Junior and Senior women and 
their partners, who are College 
Hall men, with Mrs. Temple as 
Instructor. There is a possibility 
that the Sophomore women may 
also join the group. 

Intramural volleyball has been 
organized with seven teams con- 
sisting of all co-eds. The seven 
teams are as follows: "Flying 
Tigresses," "Little Lulus," "Hell- 
Cats." Commandolls," "Cheetas," 
"Jumping Beans," and "Ban- 
shees. ' 

Badminton and ping pong tour- 
naments have also been arranged* 
for the three upper classes. Tum- 
bling and swimming supplement 
volleyball in the Soph, sched- 
ule. The Frosh, in addition to 
volleyball, will have clog dancing 
and swimming. The Preps have 
two volleyball teams, the rest of 
their physical education being 
three hours of swimming a week. 
Swimming is stressed in the Pre- 
paratory year of each student. 
It is then that she learns the fun- 
damentals of the sport. 

In addition to every gym. class, 
fifteen minutes of each period is 
devoted to body-building exercises 
to develop and keep mucles firm 
and to correct poor posture. 
V 



In Tug-O-fFar 



WHO'S WHO 

(Continued from page 1) 
Freshman year. Miss Todd is 
Head Senior of the college wo- 
men, was Vice-President of the 
Y. W. C. A. group here, and was 
Secretary. Mr. Baldridge 
is Grand Rajah of the Kappa Gam- 
ma, was President of the Gal- 
laudet College Athletic Associa- 
tion for three terms, and is 
President of the Dramatic Club. 
Mr. Berg is Class President for 
this term, was Treasurer of the 
19 Dramatic Club, and was Secretary- 
7 Treasurer of the Eta Beta Sigma. 
Mr. Meyer is Head Senior of the 
college men, Tahdheed of the 
Kappa Gamma, and is Foreman 
of the Buff and Blue printers. All 
of these Seniors have worked hard 
during their five-year stay at Gal- 
laudet, and have proved them- 
selves capable in many ways. 

WHO'S WHO, which is edited 
by H. Pettus Randall, has been 
published annually since 1934, and 
has recorded the names and biog- 
raphies of the most outstanding 
students at Gallaudet since 1939. 
V 



With a light fog blanketing the 
immediate territory, and a heavy 
coating of frost on the ground, 
the annual Prep-Frosh Tug-o- 
War went under way Friday 
morning, November 26, at 9 
o'clock. The majority of the col- 
lege personnel gathered on the 
campus facing Faculty Row to 
witness the interesting spectacle. 
A stream of frigid water was 
played over the rope between the 
evenly matched contestants. At 
the chop of a handkerchief, the 
scantily clad fellows set to work 
groaning and tugging away. Dur- 
ing the first tug, the two sides put 
up a terrific display of strength, 
neither making much headway 
against the other for some time. 
Finally, the long line of Preps be- 
gan to waver and to slip and slide 
nearer and nearer to that gushing 
stream as the Frosh, with a su- 
perhuman effort, pulled them 
through to score 1-0. They 
changed sides. During the second 
pull, the weary Preps were upset 
in a jiffy, sliding and sloshing 
through the water for the sec- 
ond time. A free-for-all followed 
on the wet grass. Apparently 
not satisfied with that .the com- 
bined forces made a dash for the 
fire hose, succeeded in gaining 
their objective, and turned the 
stream upon the spectators. Ev- 
eryone scattered in all directions, 
but before any mischief could be 
done, the water was shut off. 

As a result of their failure to 
win the Tug-O-War, the Prep boys 
shall be compelled to wear their 
buff and blue dinky caps and bow 
ties until Christmas. 



V- 



O.W.L.S. PROGRAM 

(Continued from page 1) 
aunt, Mrs. Bings. Eventually, 
however, Mrs. Bings releases her 
grip on the latch key, and the 

tory ends happily. 
Behind the scenes we find Mrs. 

Kenneth Temple and Miss Annie 
V. Craig, who interpreted very 
ably for the audience. Caroline 
Tillinghast was director, proving 
herself equal to the task. Stage 
managers were Celia Burg, '45; 
Roberta Hermann, '44; and Jean 
Smith, '4 6. Agnes Carr, '45, was 
costume manager, and Frances 
Lupo. '4 4, supplied the make-up 
art. 



SHOP NEAR BY 



Gaffi 



ins 



Men's and Boys' Wear 



Dress and Sports Wear 



Work Clothing 



925 H Street, N. E. 



Phone TRindad 8833 



Last Cross Country 
Run Is a Victory 

In spite of having lost the Ma- 
son-Dixon Conference meet to 
Mount St. xMary's, Gallaudet's 
Blue Bison harriers were still oust 
there punching for their Alma 
Mater, this time running in the 
South Atlantic Conference meet 
which was held at Clifton Park in 
Baltimore on Thanksgiving Day. 

Early that morning the boys 
were taken to Baltimore by Coach 
Sullivan and Mr. McClure. All 
along the way they tried to pic- 
ture themselves among some odd 
contestants battling for the Colle- 
giate Championship. However, 
upon arriving there, they were 
chagrined to find only Loyola Col- 
lege to give them the so craved 
for competition. Sullivan and the 
boys walked over the course, 
i which was familiar except for a 
I few slight changes and the addi- 
tion of an extra lap which made 
the course a full four miles in- 
stead of the usual three miles. 

Gallaudet and Loyola were off 
to a quick start at 12:30, with 
Gallaudet's Stanley taking a n ear- 
ly lead and retaining it until the 
end, finishing in 23:58.1. A 
group of Blue Bisons followed 
close behind in typical herd fash- 
ion, and finally came Loyola's lead 
man, finishing sixth. The list of 
finishers were as follows: 1st, 
Stanley; 2d, Marshall; 3d, Good- 
win; 4th, Hines, 5th; Norwood; 
6th, Paszek(L); 7th, Fishier; 8th, 
McKenney (L); 9th, Alms; 10th, 
Royer (L) ; 11th, Bogg (L). All in 
all, the race was among the Bis- 
ons themselves, even though Loy- 
ola did put up a good fight. The 



ART 

MATERIALS Zmi 



MUTH 

710 B™ 



A. S. F. D. 

Pres. — Leonard Meyer, '4 4 
V. P. — Donald Padden, '4 6 
Sec- Donald Wilkinson, '45 
Treas.- — Henry Krostoski, '45 
Ass't Treas.-- -Frank Sladek, '4 6 



Dramatic Club 

Pres. -Paul Baldridge, '4 4 
V. P. — Leander Moore, 44 
Sec. — Mervin Garretson, '47 
Treas.-- Ralph White, '46 



G. C. A. A. 

Pres. — Charles Pollock, 4 4 
1st V. P.— -Donald Padden, 45 
2nd V. P. — Henry Krostoski, 45 
Secy. — Lyle Wiltse, '46 
Treas. — Leander Moore, '44 
Ass't Treas. -Marvin Marshall, 4" 



G. C. \V. A. A. 

Pres. — Julia Burg, 4 4 
V. P. — Celia Burg, '45 
Sec. — Betty Jo Raines, '46 
Treas.- - Earline Becker, '4 7 



Kappa Gamma 

Grand Rajah — Bro. Baldridge, '44 
Kamoos — Bro. Padden, '45 
Tahdheed — Bro. Meyer, '44 
Mukhtar — Bro. Krostoski, '45 



Literary Society 

Pres. — Ralph White, 46 
V. P. — Warren Black well, '4 6 
Sec. — Mervin Garretson, '4 7 
Treas. — -Marvin Marshall, '47 

Movie Club 

Pres. — Meyer Plotitsky, '4 4 
V. P. — Harold Steinmau, '4 6 
Sec. — Byron Hunziker, '4 6 
Treas.- -Marvin Marshall, '4 7 

O. W. L. S. 

Pres. — Caroline Tillinghast, '44 
V. P. — Agnes Carr, '45 
Sec. — Jean Smith, '4 6 
Treas. — Marjorie Case, '4 6 
Librarian — Frances Lupo, '44 



Photography Club 

Pres. — Bertt Lependorf, '4 4 
Sec. -Treas. — Leonard Meyer, '44 
General Mgr. — W Blackwell, '46 



Reading- Room 

Chairman- -Charles Pollock, '4 4 
Meyer Plotitsky, '4 4 
Donald Padden, '45 
Sec.-Treas. — Jack Hensley, '4 5 
Warren Blackwell, '4 6 
James Drake, '4 6 



Y. M. S. C. 

Pres.- -Ralph White, 



'46 



V. P. — Jack Hensley, '4 5 
Sec. — Mervin Garretson, '4 7 
Treas. — Thomas Fishier, '4 7 

Y. W. C. A. 

Pres. — Frances Lupo, '4 4 
V. P.-— Clarhelen Wilkins, '45 
Sec- — Nadine Nichols, '46 
Treas. — Aleatha Barnes, '46 
Chairman — Arlene Stecker, '44 
Ass't Chairman — Betty Stark, '45 



final score was Gallaudet 10, Loj^ 
ola 35. So the Blues still have 
one conference victory to their 
name. 

After a quick lunch, the boys 
had the pleasure of witnessing the 
the National Championship race 
which was run by such teams as 
Notre Dame, Annapolis, Stone- 
wall Democratic Club of Balti- 
more, New York Athletic Club, 
and Shanahan Catholic Club from 
Philadelphia. 

The Gallaudetilans returned 
home at the close of an eventful 
day to be greeted with a big tur- 
key dinner which had been saved 
for them. After all, the boys had 
much to be thankful for. There 
is no ration on "bringing home 
the bacon." 



CASSON STUDIO 



Photographers of the 1943 Buff and Blue 



1305 Conn. Avenue N. W. 



DEeatur 1333 



PAGE FOUR 



The Buff and Blue 



Thursday, December 16, 1943 



NEWS OF THE ALUMNI 



By \V infield S. Kunde, '01 



Paul Lange, '92 and '96, for- 
merly a teacher in the Wisconsin 
. -ciiool. now an expert tree sur- 
geon and I'm' sixteen years a mem- 
ber of the Delavan Park Board, 
sends us the following interesting 
recollection ot the late .Martin 
..i. Taylor, '9 2: 

"ivlartin M. Taylor, '92, of 
Allegan, .Michigan, passed away 
June 21, after an illness of six 
months. Surviving are the wife 
Cora Shutts Taylor, a graduate of 
the Rome, N. Y. School for the 
Deaf whom he married at Fair- 
mount, JN. Y., in 1893, three 
daughters and two sons, William 
Taylor of Kalamazoo, Michigan, 
Lt. Artnur Taylor of Camp ClaD 
borne, La., Mrs. Gladys Sooterna 
of Detroit, Mrs. Ross Peck of Fori 
Huron and Mrs. Maud Gretten- 
berger of Imlay City, Michigan. 
He was a member of St. Luke's 
episcopal Church of Kalamazoo 
and for several years a lay reader 
for the deaf there. He was also a 
member of the Kalamazoo Divi- 
sion of the National Fraternal 
Society of the Deaf. 

After graduating at Gallaudet, 
Mr. Taylor taught for three years 
at the North Dakota School. He 
subsequently taught in the Little 
Rock, Arkansas and Baton Rouge, 
Louisiana Schools. Since 1928 he 
lived at Allegan, Michigan, where 
he worked as a printer. 

Measuring 6 feet 4 inches in his 
stocking feet and of powerful 
build, he was one of the greatest 
athletes that ever wore Gallaudet 
colors. During his college career 
lie won many gold mdals in con- 
tests sponsored by the leading 
athletic clubs of Washington. In 
holding football games of all star 
teams, he invariably found a 
place in the backfield along side 
the famous Princeton quarter- 
back King and notable players of 
Havard, Yale and other univer- 
sity teams of his day." 

. V 

The college friends of Richard 
Wallace Williams, '9 5, teacher 
for many years in the Wisconsin 
School, husband of the former 
Helen Pence, '24, who is also a 
teacher in the same school, will 
regret to learn that he recently 
suffered a stroke. Helen has been 
compelled to relinquish her du- 
ties at the school in order to give 
Wallace the care that he needs. 
Enga Anderson Gayles Hagerty, 
'06, wife of Thomas Hagerty, '90 
is substituting for Helen. Thomas 
has been employed as Delavan's 
Park Custodian. 

V 

Margaret Bruns and Mabel 
Northern Finnell, both of the 
Normal Class of 19 34 made a sur- 
prise call on the Alumni Editor 
and wife (Frances Norton, '01) 
Armistice Day. Margaret is teach- 
ing in the Berkeley School. Mabel 
is a teller in a Los Angeles bank 
for the duration. Her husband is 
doing some kind of government 
service. Both Margaret and Mabel 
are fluent in the use of the sign 
language and manual alphabet 
and, though they hear perfectly 
and are oral teachers, they often 
converse in the language that is 
so dear to the deaf. To be an oral 
teacher and yet be accomplished 
in the sign language makes such 
a teacher a valuable asset to any 
school for the deaf. The reason 
is too obvious to be mentioned. 
The profession needs more such! 
V 

The Rev. Dr. Herbert Claude 
Merrill, '96, and wife (Emma Vail, 
ex '01) have gone south, like the 
birds, to escape the winter rigors 
of the north. They are now com- 
fortably located at 322 Ninth Ave., 
St. Petersburg, Florida, whare 
they can dispense with furs and 
other heavy trappings and bask 
in the warm tropical sunshine 
Avhile enjoying the scenic marvels 
of the broad Atlantic. 



122.3 H. St., N. E., AT 9354 

FELDMAN'S 
The Store For Distinctive Jewelry 
Watches Diamonds Silverware 

(Repairing of All Kinds) 



William F. Schneider, '02, is 
working in a defense plant in 
Maywood, Los Angeles, where he 
enjoys high Avages in a genial 
climate. 

V 

Waldo H. Rothert, '98, and 
wile (Florence Phelps, ex-'OOj 
now reside; in inglewood, near 
Lo s Angeles. Waldo is living the 
life of Riley and enjoys the visits 
of old college friends. 

V 

LTizabeth Taylor, ex-'OO, is 
living in Santa Monica. Mary 
Elsworth Thompson and Florence 
Phelps Rothert, of the same class, 
live near by and the three, with 
Alice Taylor Terry, ex-01, often 
get together for a confab on the 
good old days when they were 
belles on Kendall Green. Mary is 
now a widow. She sold her little 
ranch and intends moving to Los 
Angeles. She formerly lived in 
.,ew York. 

V ■ 

Willie Kilgore Dudley, ex-08, is 
a uirector of the large Los Angeieg 
Club for the Deaf and also does 
tied Cross work. Her home is in 
Santa Monica. 

— V 

It may not be generally known 
that James N. Orman, '2 3, has 
been supervising teacher of the 
manual classes at the Illinois 
School since 194 0. Jimmy is also 
editor of The Illinois Advance 
which his able pen fills with read- 
ing matter that aims at interest- 
ing the parents, friends of the 
scnool and the pupils. The idea 
of having a well-trained and ex- 
perienced deaf teacher, of college 
caliber, supervise the manual 
classes is doing the proper thing 
by the pupils who come into that 
classification. Where there is a 
sufficient number of pupils to 
organize eight, to twelve grades 
with a deaf supervising teacher 
at the helm there is bound to be 
accomplishments in line with 
planned objectives. The head of 
the Illinois School, Daniel T. 
Cloud, Hon-'41, has tke correct 
cue, and his appointment of Jim- 
my should result in giving' the 
deaf children in the manual class- 
es the best education possible. 
V— 

Eugene Clements, '42, has goie 
to the Illinois School from the 
Hartford School where h« had 
been teaching since receiving his 
degree. At the Illinois School, 
besides teaching he is assisting 
in Scout work and athletics. 
When he was a pupil at the 
Illinois School he attained Eagle 
Scout status. During the summer 
he worked in an aircraft plant in 
East Hartford. 

—V 

Roy Moore Stelle, N-'41, sev- 
ered his connection with the 111- 
nois School. (He was supervis- 
ing teacher of the primary unit.) 
Now he is in the F.B.I. He was 
married to Miss Elizabeth Capps, 
of Washington, D. C. After a 
period in Houston, Texas, he was 
transferred to Pittsburg, Pa. 
V — — 

Tunis V. Archer, N-'93, is still 
with the Illinois School as princi- 
pal. He was a member of the 
second normal class at Gallaude\ 
That he has remained in the pro- 
fession so long is a splendid trib- 
ute to his loyalty to the cause 
of struggling deaf children. We 
need more of his spirit and self- 
lessness — men and women of high 
education who are imbued with 
altruism. 

-V 

During the summer David Mud- 
gett, '29, worked in the Chicago 
plant of the Campbell Soup Com- 
pany. He was trouble shooter for 



1 1 1 1 1 1 II I II 1 1 1 1 G 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 i E 1 1 1 1 1 1 [ 1 1 ! G E I ' i M U 

LITTLE I 

9th St., South otf G E 

Hearing aids for most seats! E 

First Run & Revivals E 
See Daily Papers for Programs 5 



the production superintendent, 
making time studies, subbing for 
the regular foreman who was 
on vacation and teaching the fore- 
man Lite sign language. While 
Dave inhaled soup aroma day 
in and day out, his good wife 
(Grace Davis, '31) "planted, har- 
vested and quick-froze" products 
of a backyard venture. Now Dave 
and Gracie do not have to worry 
about points— as far as canned 
vegetables are concerned. They 
look forward to a winter abun- 
dantly provided for in their well- 
stocked cellar. 

V 

Marshall Hester. N-'32, raised 
a victory garden on the Califor- 
nia School grounds. He also 
raised two or three dozen chick- 
ens that are now laying and keep- 
ing his table supplied. Marshall 
is the genial supervising teacher 
of the advanced department. His 
boy and girl attend public school. 
At slated times he and Superin- 
tendent Elwood A. Stevenson, N- 
11, make the rounds of the Day 
schools of the State. Elwood is 
the responsible head of all schools 
for the deaf in California. 

V 

William Milligan. N-'30, has the 
position of supervising teacher of 
the primary unit in the Illinios 
School. On the side Bill is the 
school's coach. Last year his 
team made headlines in the ama- 
teur sporting sections of local 
newspapers. On account of the 
war, however, only contests with 
Jacksonville High Schools have 
been arranged for this season. 

V 

Harvey Barnes, N-'31, worked 
in the personnel manager's office 
of the Campbell Soup Company 
of Chicago. It was his duty to 
hire and place handicapped help. 
In this role he placed around 35 
deaf persons and quite a few capa- 
ble blind boys. The result was 
highly satisfactory to the com- 
pany. Vocational training for the 
handicapped is Harvey's life 
work. 

V 

Cora Denton, '13, long employed 
in a Los Angeles manufacturing 
concern, has been on vacation in 
Oregon, where her mother lives. 

V 

Lillian Hahn, '39, is doing- 
specialized work in a large con- 
cern in Los Angeles, having con- 
Tacts for government orders of 
some kind. Lillian writes for The 
Silent Broadcaster. As this lovely 
American Korean possesses liter- 
ary ability, we think she would 
do well to try to get into the 
magazines. There is a strong 
demand for good fiction these war 
days and it seems to us that Lil- 
lian could fill the bill to some 
extent. Why not try? 

V 

Robert N. Greenmun. '36. as- 
sociate editor of The Ohio Chron- 
icle has an article in the pamph- 
e1 published by the Ontario As- 
sociation of the Deaf entitled: 
Destroy What You Cannot Un- 
derstand". The article is in de- 
fense of the Belleville School for 
Tie Deaf, which some misguided 
zealots of unfortunately strong 
nfluence have been urging clos- 
ing and placing the several hun- 
dred deaf children in different un- 
graded schools throughout the 
province. It is a very strong pre- 
sentation on the stand taken by 
the adult deaf, who bitterly re- 
sent the move. Robert handles 
the matter without gloves. Backed 
by experience, and having an 
intimate knowledge of the psy- 
chology of the deaf child, he sails 



into tiic absurd contentions oifi 
tlic uninformed and rips their 

theories ( as to "what is best for 
the deaf child") as easily as it 
is to puncture a soap bubble. 
When you read Robert's article, 
do not ask — Where are our pre- 
sent-day leaders? Look around 
you. 

_V 

John E. Penn, '25, has gone 
from Roanoke, Va., to Washing- 
ton, D. C, where he is clerking in 
he Department of Commerce. 
V 

Catherine Havens Pumphrey 

35, has gone to Portland, Ore., 

with her little son and sister to 

join her husiband. He is a diver 

employed in the Kaiser Ship- 

i yards. 

_ — _ — v ■ 

Emil Path, '::4. finds little time 
o look up his pals and friends of 
lis college days because he is kept 
going with the swift pace of the 
Army Air forces whose headquar- 
ters are in the Pentagon Building. 

V 

Louis P. Schulte, 'u4, is still 
with the Government Printing Of- 
fice, where he has worked since 
daving college. 

V 

Robert Werdig, '23, is an "in 
and outer"— now you see him, now 
you don't, a la Houdini. 
V 

John A. Gongh, N-'32, makes 
things By at the Oklahoma School 
where he is Superintendent. It is 
said that even visitors upon pass- 
ing the portals of the school feel 
or sense the activity within. It 
is the esprit de corps of a school's 
peronnel that lifts standards of 
educational attainments. When 
the head of a school has his heart 
in the work and translates this 
interest into action, things begin 
to hum; and soon there is a busy, 
bustling, happy, harmonious 
whole! All schools for the deaf 
need such leaders or else the rut 
will become deeper and deeper un- 
til stale apathy crumbles the 
stately educational structure. Ah! 
new brooms, you say, sweep clean 
but new brooms used properly, 
with light rhythmic sweep, can 
.vieid gently and effcectivelj ixw 
years and years, and still be good! 

Earl Sollenberger, '34, has put 
aside, for the while, his wont to 
cultivate the muse. At present 
ne is submerged in cold figuring 
in the Office of Price Administra- 
tion. This necessity stifles natu- 
ral bent and the world possibly is 
poorer. 

V 

Albert Rose, '27 sent his two 
youngsters to Virginia to escape 
the Washington heat. This move 
enabled him and his wife to step 
out often and repay social obli- 
gations which they could seldom 
do when the children were 
around. 

-V 

Donald R. Berke, '4 0, is em- 
ployed in a war plant in Detroit, 
Mich. Last spring he took time 
off to visit his old haunts around 
the college campus. 

V 

E. Florence Long, one of the 
lirst coeds of Gallaudet, wife of 
the late Dr. J. Schuyler Long, '89, 



became a great-grandmother, No- 
vember 5, when a son was born to 
her granddaughter, Annabel Ste- 
venson Stein. The event occurred 
in Louisville. Ky.. where her hus- 
;and, Lieut. William Stein, is sta- 
ioned E. Florem-e 13 still teach- 
ing and the Iowa School now 
boasts the only great-grandmother 
on its faculty, which is probably 
an honor accorded no other school 
for the deaf in the United States. 
Annabel's father, you probably 
know, is Dr. Elwood A. Stevenson, 
head of the California School. 
Both he and his wife (Edith 
Long) were normals at Gallaudet 
1 i and 12. 

-V— 
After fifteen years with the 
.Missouri School as vocational 
principal, Arthur G. Norris has 
severed his connection with the 
school. He is -now a technical 
writer in the engineering depart- 
ment of the Bendix Radio Corpor- 
ation of Baltimore. Mr. Norris 
is the only son of Arthur Hilton 
Norris, '01. In his college days 
Arthur was the mathematical 
wonder of his class. He never 
eemed to lose any sleep over in- 
, bility to solve assigned mathe- 
'< natical problems. In the class- 
jroom he would just read through 
the problem, strut up to the black 
board and rapidly arrive at thi 
correct answ-er. Probably the son 
has his father's gift. 

V 

George H. Davies, '20, is the 
:ery efficient instructor of print- 
ng in the Oklahoma School, 
where he has labored for twenty- 
two years. For some time George 
has been teaching while his wife 
s doing her bit with the Tulsa 
Douglas Aircraft Plant. Their 
son was for a short time with the 
WesUinghouse Elecitric Company 
nit 11 he went into the army. 

John H. McFarlane, '07, teach- 
er in the Alabama School and 
editor of the Messenger has a 
poem, written in memory of the 
late Dr. J. Schuyler Long. '89, in 
a New York anthology of poems 
published not so long ago. John 
is a master of our tongue and he 
is able at will to marshal his 
thoughts toto rivid Prord pirtures 
that is music to the ear. 

Thomas Dillon, '4 0, has been 
so successful as a teacher in the 
Santa Fe School for the Deaf that 
Superintendent Wesley O. Connor, 
N-'95, has advanced him to the 
Principalship. Tom's wife (Flor- 
ence Hunter, '4 0) has been added 
to the faculty. What a fine thing 
tor the school to have an under- 
standing Supt. who knows what 
the deaf children need and does 
not hesitate to advance a com- 
petent deaf teacher to the res- 
ponsibility of Principal. 



Louis C. Tuck, '70 and '04, is 
the oldest living graduate of Gal- 
laudet. He is around 90 years. 
In Faribault, Minnesota, near the 
school where he labored year in 
and year out, he is comfortably 
taken care of by a nurse. 

V 

Ellen Parker Davidson Hofstea- 
ter, '2 8, left Oakland, Cal., for 
Talladega, Ala., to dispose of her 
property and bring back her be- 
loved three dogs. Howard, '30, 
meanwhile, is boarding at the 
home of Louis Byouk, '29, in 
Berkeley. Hoffy has been look- 
ing for a house to purchase be- 
cause it is impossible to find any 
place to rent because of the great 
nt lux of shipyard and aircraft 
workers. 



Gallaudet Is Represented 
In Golden Gloves 



Mrs. Geo. L. Sutton 

Mrs. L. Sutton Bailey 

ATlantic 115 3 

PEOPLES 

FLOWER SHOP 

"Say It With Flowers" 

900 H Street. N. E. 



niiiiiiiiminimmmiiniiMiiiiiiiinimiiiiiiiiCJ iiimiC3iiiiiimi!Oiim!!i:: 



'aawLi 




Thomas Rippe, who was con- 
sidered an "underdog" by many 
a Gallaudet student, successfully 
copped his first fight in the Gold- 
en Glove Tournament the night 
of December 3 in Turners Arena. 
Rippe, being better polished in 
the art of self-defense than his 
opponent, Stan Levin, unattached, 
won the first two rounds, the sec- 
ond by a slight margin. The third 
round consisted of a weary slug 
fest, mastered by Levin. 

Robert Clark, a 147 pounder, 
was counted out in the first round 
as the result of a rabbit punch 
by Harold Taylor of the National 
Training School. Gallaudet' s 
lightweight, Frank Murphy, while 
ahead on points, was stopped in 
37 seconds in the first round by 
a solar plexus blow delivered 
solidly by Bernard Shatz of the 
Mt. Rainier B.C. 

The remaining Gallaudet en- 
trees in the Golden Gloves tourna- 
ment are: Thomas Rippe, Earl 
Elkins and Marvin Marshall. The 
tourney will continue on the 
succeeding Friday nights, and 
these three boxers will compete 
until elimination, or until they 
win the championship of their" 
division, if they are fortunate 
enough. We hope they will be. 



The Buff and Blue wishes to 
extend to its readers a Merry 
Christmas and a Happy New Year. 



» 









Merry j& Christinas 
Class of "47 



7k MBr. 4800 

E3IIIMIMIIIIC3ll!llllimiU:ilWIIIIII[]!li!llllllllC3 !IIIIIC3«!IIIIIIIIUC1I!H!I!HIH[3IIIIIIIII [i 



Woodward & Lothrop 

11 & F St., N. W. 



QlaueA and MittenA 



From Canada and Mexico come some of the 
merriest, warmest, friendliest of good neigh- 
bors handmade woolen gloves and mittens 

intent on keeping your fingers warm, come 
winter. For you who are doing Christim^ 
<\w ping or you who are thinking of sugges- 
tions to send Santa, tlie.se are the perfect answer. 
In fiesta colors and sturdy northern weaves.... 

$2 to- $4.3.5 



W & L— Gloves, Aisle 18, First Floor 



Basketball with 
J. H. U. — Jan. 28 



T 



JUJC 

OK 




Basketball -- Naval 
Com'c't'iis - Jan.29 



VOLUME LII, NUMBER 6 



GALLAUDET COLLEGE, KENDALL GEEEN, WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Friday, January 21, 1944 



Birthday of Thomas H. Gallaudet 
Commemorated by Program 



Anecdotes and Facts About 
Life of Gallaudet Related 



December 10th, the birthday 
of Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet, 
founder of the Hartford School 
for the Deaf, and father of the 
founder of Gallaudet College, was 
faithfully observed with a special 
program given by a student group 
in Chapel Hall, under the direc- 
tion of Prof. Harley D. Drake 
and Mrs. Thomas K. Kline. 

Calvin George, '4 5, gave a gen- 
eral View of the life of Thomas 
H. Gallaudet. This story manages 
to hold the interest of the au- 
dience every year, and is told in 
a new light and by a different 
person each time. It is interest- 
ing to note that Dr. Gallaudet, 
while chaplain of an asylum of 
the mentally bereaved, was once 
confronted by an inmate armed 
with a knife. In order to divert 
the man's evil intentions and save 
his own life, Dr. Gallaudet coolly 
challenged this inmate to twirl 
his key chain just as he himself 
was doing. 

Julia Burg, '44, spoke on Dr. 
Mason F. Cogswell and his deaf 
daughter, Alice. She explained 
Dr. Gallaudet's sympathetic devo- 
tion to this little girl whom others 
also pitied but did no 1 actually 
help. One of the iate Dr. J. s. 
Long's treasured poems, "Gallau- 
det Day, " was rendered by Keith 
Lange, '47. 

Professor Drake remarked that 
the latest tribute to the greatness 
of the work of our benefactor lay 
in the naming of the Liberty 
snip, the "Thomas H. ©allaudet." 
In speaking of Dr. Gallaudet, Mrs. 
Pearl S. Buck, who christened 
this ship, said, "What is extra- 



ordinary is how a life touched by 
an apparently small incident 
through the development of an 
interest, can produce such great 
effect for so many people." Sta- 




<s^^W a/£iJc 



H^C 



tistics were also given to show 
the growth in the education of the 
deaf since the founding of the 
Hartford School in 1817. 

Owing to rainy weather and the 
influenza epidemic, the student 
body could not assemble before 
the statue of Gallaudet and Alice 
to witness the traditional placing 
of the wreath. However, the 
faculty and the new students 
were invited to witness the cere- 
mony from the shelter of the 
front portico. Head Seniors Car- 
lie Todd and Leonard Meyer led 
the chosen group to the portico 
and then proceeded to the statue. 
The program was fittingly con- 
ciuubC by Jean oinuu, -n>, who 
presented the poem, "Gallaudet 
and Alice,"' by Loy E. Golladay, 
'34. 



Christmas Activity 
Schedule Full 



The advent of the Christmas 
holidays found the student body 
scattered over a wide area. The 
majority of the students spent 
the vacation in their homes or 
visiting with nearby friends and 
relatives, while only a relatively 
few chose to remain on Kendall 
Green. Nevertheless, those who 
remained on the Green took part 
in an impressive variety of activi- 
ties which did much to lessen the 
pangs of homesickness. 

This gala list of activities be- 
gan with a social held in Chapel 
Hall, Thursday, December 23. On 
Christmas Eve the students ga- 
thered in the Chapel where Prof. 
Frederick H. Hughes told an 
interesting story, entitled "All 
Finished, Sahib." Following Prof. 
Hughes' story, a "grab bag" was 
held. Christmas Day was spent 
in a comparatively quiet manner.. 
At 1 o'clock a Christmas dinner 
was served to the hungry stu- 
dents. This dinner, which con- 
sisted of roast chicken and all 
the trimmings, was enjoyed by 
all. Following the dinner, the 
students spent a quiet afternoon 
playing table games or just visit- 
ing. After the evening meal, a 
theatre party was held from 7 
to 11 o'clock. 

"Open House" was held at 



See XMAS ACTIVITY, page 3 



Juniors Snatch First 
Place on Honor Roll 



The Junior Class gained recog- 
nition for itself when the Honor 
Roll for the first term appeared, 
the names of eight students being 
placed on it. Following close at 
the heels of the Juniors were the 
Seniors with a total of seven 

See HONOR ROLL, page 3 



Christmas Holidays as 
Spent by Fac Members 



The Christmas holidays brought 
a welcome and much-needed rest 
to most of the faculty members 
here. Most of them spent the 
vacation quietly in their homes, 
while a few traveled to near-foy 
states. Dean Elizabeth Peet jour- 
neyed to New York where she 
spent the entire vacation visiting; 
friends. Dr. Percival Hall re- 
mained at home, and after enjoy- 
ing his Christmas dinner, was 
taken to bed with the flu. Dean 
Irving S. Fusfeld spent his vaca- 
tion preparing class schedules and 
doing the hundred and one things 
that are always necessary at the 
beginning of each new term. He 
spent Christmas Day at home, 
where he was surprised by a visit 
from his son who is in the Artil- 
lery branch of the Army. Prof. 
Walter J. Krug remained at 
home throughout the entire vaca- 
tion. Perhaps he taught the twins 
some Algebra, and tried to recov- 
er from the headaches the 
"Preps" caused him during the 
past term. Prof. Percival 
Hall, Jr., also spent the majority 
of the vacation at home, trying 
to recover from the flu, although 
he was able to be up and enjoy a 
nice quiet Christmas Day with his 
family, Mrs. Amy and Dr. Powrie 
Doctor are enjoying a visit from 



See FACULTY XMAS, page 3 

V . 

Concert Presented by 
Sophomores 

An exceedingly enjoyable con- 
cert, pertaining to Christmas in 
topic, was presented by the S'oph- 
omore Class in the Chapel on 
Sunday evening, December 12th. 

After Class Pres. pro tern Ralph 
White started the program with 



College Increases 
A. R. C. Blood Bank 



Not to be outdone by the patri- 
otic co-eds, twenty-one of the 
young men students of Colli ge 
Hall donated a pint of blood each 
to the Red Cross Blood Bank. On 
Wednesday afternoon, Decern i>er 
8, a truck was sent to the college 
and eight of tne total number of 
boys went to the Blood Center. 
On Friday, December 10, another 
truck appeared, and this time the 
remaining twelve men made the 
trip. For many of the young mm, 
this was the first experience in 
giving blood to the Red Cross. 
There were some, however, who 
had donated once before, and rel- 
atively few who were making 
their third donation. Those do- 
nating for the first time were pre- 
sented with bronze pins, while 
those donating for third time re- 
ceived silver pins. These young 
men were: Thomas Berg, '44; 
Bertt Lependorf, '44; Calvin 
George, '45; Willis Ayers, '45; 
Dewey Samples, '46; Wayne Fur- 
long, '4 6; Billy Brightwell, '46; 
Frank Sladek, '46; Herman John- 
son, '46; Cecil Alms, '46; Robert 
Kleberg, '4 7; Fred Yates, P. C; 
Carl Barber, P. C; Joseph Broz, 
P. C; Gwendol Butler, P. C; 
Robert Clark, P. C; John Kubis, 
P. C; Malcolm Norwood, P. C; 
Lawrence Newman, P. C; John 
Murphy, P. C; and Darwin 
Younggren, .P C. 



Sullivan Speaks 
On Christmas 



The last Sunday evening lec- 
ture for the first term was given 
by Mr. English Sullivan in Chapel 
Hall on December 19th. As would 
be expected at that time of the 
year, the subject was "Christ- 
mas." 

The custom of giving gifts on 
Christmas was originated by a 
Christian saint, named Nicholas, 
Bishop of Myra in Asia Minor, 
when he left three bags of gold 
on the doorstep of a poor mer- 
chant so that he would be able 
to give his three daughters a dow- 
ry on their wedding. Our ideas 
and conceptions of Santa Glaus 
are based on the drawings of 
Thomas Nast, famed cartoonist, 
who also brought into our lives 
the Democratic elephant and the 
Republican donkey. 

The word "Christmas" Jis iin 
truth a modification of the words, 
"The Mass of Christ," which 
changed through the ages. The 
never-to-be-forgotten poem, "The 
Night before Christmas," by Clem- 
ent Clarke Moore, portrays in 
words clearly and exactly the at- 
mosphere of Christmas Eve. The 
student body and the faculty of 
Gallaudet College will recall how 
Betty Stark, '45, signed the same 
ipoeni so well at the Sophomore 
concert in December, 19 42. 

This talk was presented in a 
clear manner, proving enjoyable 
as well as educational. 



"Amateur Nighi" Scores Another 
Triumph for the Dramatic Club 



Much Hidden 1 alent Among 
Lowers Unearthed in Plays 



See SOPH. CONCERT, page 4 



"Amateur Night" in Chapel 
Hall Friday evening, December 
10th, scored a shining triumph 
for the Gallaudet Dramatic Club. 
The program consisted of four 
short plays, each directed by a 
member of the club. 

The opening play, "Hist! She's 
a Man," directed by Mervin Gar- 
retson, '47, won much applause. 

It was a rollicking comedy 
in which Roy Sperry, '46, in the 
role of Philip Dawson, dressed as 
a girl to fill in a gap at a dinner 
party. Equally mirth-producing 
was "Chickadee," directed by 
Leandor Moore, '44, which por- 
trayed the five Halsey Brainerds 
who assembled for the serious 
business of choosing a profession 
for an unexpected new addition to 
their ranks. All their plans, how- 
ever, were nearly wrecked when 
the baby was found to be a girl. 

Perhaps the most outstanding 
play was "The Perfect Gentle- 
man," directed by Paul Bald- 
ridge, '44, a fast-moving comedy 
centered around a high school 
girl who invited her chemistry 
teacher to dinner. Agnes Minor. 
'47, as the high school girl, had 



Gallaudet and the 
Cosmos Club 



One of Washington's leading 
newspapers, The Sunday Star, re- 
cently carried a full-page article 
on "The Historic Madison Place 
and Two Famous Local Clubs." 
In this article, a list of the Cos- 
mos Club's presidents was giv- 
en. The Cosmos Club is one of 
the most exclusive organizations 
of the nation's capital, and one 
of its best scientific clubs. The 
membership of this club included 
nearly all the prominent figures 
of art, literature, and science of 
the late eighties, so it is not sur- 
prising that we find the name of 
Edward Miner Gallaudet listed 
as the sixth president of this 



a tremendous crush on J. Hens- 
it>, '-±o, the teacher, and was 
therefore very eager to make a 
good impression. She worked the 
whole household into a state of 
tension, rehearsing the family and 
trying to subdue her boisterous 
brother. As is usually the case, 
however, when the teacher ar- 
rived, everything happened exactly 
contrary to her plans. 

"I Pledge Allegiance," a heart- 
stirring drama of espionage in 
the Walter's household, directed 
by Ralph White, '4 6, introduced 
a patriotic theme. Silas Hirte, 
'46, a Nazi agent, and Ruby Miller, 
'4 7, as Mrs. Walter, were the chief 
actors in this play. 

The program came to a beauti- 
ful close with "The Star-Spangled 
Banner" signed by Malvine Fis- 
cher, '44, before a background of 
the national flag ingeniously con- 
structed of crepe paper streamers. 

To those who worked in a body 
to make the evening the success it 
was much praise is due. Working 
backstage were: Stage managers, 
Leander Moore, '44, and Paul 
Baldridge, '44; property men, 
Ralph White, '4 6, and Mervin 
Garretson, '47; and stage hands, 
Joe Broz, Lyle Mortenson, Dar- 
win Younggren, Lawrence Leit- 
son and Leslie Massey. Prompters 
were Julia Burg, '44, and Fran- 
ces Lupo, '44. Mrs. Kenneth Tem- 
ple and Prof. P. Hall, Jr. inter- 
preted for the audience. 

V 

ALUMNI, PLEASE NOTE! 



In order to avoid delay 
caused by remailing, please 
have all alumni news sent di- 
rect to the Alumni Editor: 

Your cooperation will be 
deeply appreciated. 

Mr. Winfield S. Runde 
5845 Chabot Court 
Oakland 11, California 



distinguished group. 

The fact that Gallaudet's name 
still makes occasional appear- 
ances in the newspapers and 
magazines of today, many years 
after his death, is sufficient proof 
; of the everlasting fame and 
' popularity of this great educator 
of the deaf. 



Merrymaking on 
New Year's Eve 



Old Man 1943 was given a rous- 
ing send-off in Old Jim on New 
Year's Eve. Those students who 
remained for the holidays and 
several members of the Faculty 
gathered there to celebrate the 
departure of the aged 1943 and 
to usher in the infant 1944. 

The party starte 1 at 9 o'clock 
and the dancing c mtinued until 
11, when everyone paused for 
refreshments which consisted of 
punch and cookies. After the re- 
freshments, the gay crowd again 
responded to the merry strains 
of the Radiola. Shortly before 
the zero hour, the dancers again 
paused, this time to await the 
last breath of the Old Year. The 
Seniors tripped oi t of the Gym 
and rushed up the Chapel Tower 
to observe the anuual ringing of 
the bell. Each Senior eagerly 
awaited his turn to help toll in 
the new year. When the clock 
struck twelve, the Chapel bell 
pealed out, and there was a deaf- 
ening din in the Old Jim as the 
merry-makers made good use of 
their horns a-r d other noise- 
makers. 

Taking all in a; 1, the party was 
a huge success, a id much thanks 
and credit should be given to the 
Y. M. S. C. for planning the affair 
and to the chape ons, Miss Irene 
Palagi and Dr. Pi wrie Doctor. 
V 

Sophomores Present 
Literary Program in Chape! 

An interesting and entertaining 
Literary Society program was giv- 
en in Chapel Fall on the evening 
of De/cember 1 1. The * ro t "7"v | 
under the management of the 
Sophomore class, presented a wide 
variety of features. First of these 
was a poem, "The Negro," clearly 
signed by Jack Hensley, '45. Next, 
Tennyson's "Charge of the Light 
Brigade" was signed by Warren 
Blackwell, '46. With the aid of the 
beating of a drum backstage, Mr. 
Blackwell was able to give a 
realistic representation of the 
thundering of the cannon. Fol- 
lowing Mr. Blackwell, Cecil 
Alms, '4 6, told an interesting 
story entitled, "The Doctor." 
Harold Steinman, '46, gave an 
entertaining monologue, "Danc- 
ing Feet," in which he portrayed 
the lives of a dancer, her 
daughter, and her husband. The 
program closed with a burlesque 
of Shakespeare's "Romeo and 
Juliet." Roy Sperry, '46, played 
the part of a colored Juliet and 
Warren Blackwell, '4 6, took up 
the role of Romeo. 



Talk 6* Exhibition 
On Stamps— Kline 

Philately was the subject of 
Prof. Thomas K. Kline's talk in 
Chapel Hall on Sunday, December 
5th. He made quite clear at the 
beginning the marked distinction 
between mere stamp collecting 
and philately. A collector collects 
stamps while a philatelist goes 
further ... he studies his 
stamps. 

Philately is a very practical 
hobby as shown by Professor 
Kline. Some of the interests de- 
veloped from this study are ge- 
ography, history, science, and 
agriculture. He also expressed 
hi^ belief that juvenile delinquen- 
cy could be greatly lessened if 
adolescents were encouraged to 
collect stamps instead of indulg- 
ing in unprofitable pastimes. 
President Roosevelt finds that his 
interest in philately aids him 
greatly in his work as chief ex- 
ecutive, and in his off hours. 

After the enlightening talk, the 
audience inspected the display of 
stamps arranged by Mr. Kline in 
the Chapel. It consisted of groups 
of beautifully mounted stamps, 
one of which depicted the flags 
of Nazi-held nations, another the 
faces of American poets and 
authors, and another scenes from 
America's national parks. Al- 
though the display was self-ex- 
planatory, Mr. Kline was on hand 
to answer any questions that 
might arise. 

V" 

Changes Made in 
fc 2ndJ~erm Schedule 

With the departure of Prof. 
Margaret Yofler Crcftm thu Gallau- 
det College Faculty in December, 
a number of changes have been 
made in the classroom and her 
duties taken over by other mem- 
bers of the Faculty. 

The preparatory class has been 
divided into two sections instead 
of three. 

Professor Yoder's work in pre- 
paratory English and history has 
been divided between Professors 
Irving S. Fusfeld and William J. 
McClure. Professor McClure will 
continue with his clashes in Latin 
Professors Walter J. Krug and 
Percival Hall, Jr., have been as- 
signed classes in preparatory 
mathematics. 

Mrs. Howard Fisher, a gradu- 
ate of Goucher College, has volun- 
teered for teaching work and will 
give the freshman course in art 
appreciation. She is the daughter 
of the Percival Halls and has 
lived on the Green for a number 
of years. 



O. W. L. S. Present Dedication 
Of New E. M. Nelson Alcove 



Former College Librarian £h 
O.W.LS. Advisor Honored 



The O. W. L. S. observed their 
fifty-second birthday on the eve- 
ning of January eighth at 8 
o'clock. Several alumnae mem- 
bers were present, among whom 
was Mrs. Olaf Hanson, the first 
president of the O. W. L. S. 

The evening was spent playing 
parlor games, with Mrs. Alan 
Crammattee, '35, and Clarice Pet- 
rick, '44, winning the door prizes. 

The highlight of the evening 
was the dedication of the E. M. 
Nelson Alcove. Frances Lupo, 
'44, the O. W. L. S. librarian, de- 
livered the address with a brief 
sketch of Miss Nelson's life. She 
also explained that the Alclove 
idea was originated by Nina Van 
Oss, '4 3. Miss Van Oss also start- 
ed it by contributing four books 
to this little library. These books 
are: "Kate Fennigate," "The 
Wide Net (And Other Stories)," 
"The Robe," and "Signed with 



Their Honor." For the duration, 
the E. M. Nelson Alcove will con- 
sist of one shelf, which is in- 
dicated by a neatly lettered card*- 
board sign. After the war, these 
will Ibe replaced by a permanent 
bookcase and an engraved plate. 
The following Contributions 
were made for the Alcove at the 
party: "Old California," by Mrs. 
Olaf Hanson; "American Wo- 
man's Cook B'ook, " by Mrs. Har- 
ley D. Drake; "Cinderella Retold 
in Verse," by Mrs. Alan Cram- 
matte; "Why Women Cry," by 
Mrs. Ivan Curtis; "Past Imper- 
fect," by Mrs. Heimo Antila; 
"Best-Loved Poems of American 
People," by Mrs. Carmen Ludo- 
vico; and "Hungry Hill," by Mrs. 
Alfred Watson. Dean Elizabeth 
Peet and Miss Josephine Beesley 
Peet, Miss J. Beesley. Miss R. 
Atkins, Mrs. R. J. Stewart, and 
Mrs. K. Temple donated money 
to purchase more books. 

Punch and cake were served, 

and Mrs. Hanson ceremoniously 

cut the first piece of cake. Thus 

another year has been added to 

the prestige of the O. W. L. S. 



PAGE TWO 



The Buif and Blue 



Thursday, December 16, 1943 



The i>iiff and Blue 



Published once a month during October, De- 
cember, January, February and twice a month 
during November, March, April and May. Entered 
at the Post Office at Washington as second-class 
mail matter. 

Subscription Price $2.00 per year 

(Payable in advance.* 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Malvine Fischer, '44 

LITERARY EDITOR Bertt Lependorf, '44 

NEWS EDITOR Byron Hunziker, '4 6 

SPORTS EDITOR Lyle A. Wiltse, '46 

ASS'T SPORTS ED Clarhelen Wilkins, '45 

ALUMNI EDITOR Winfield S. Runde, 01 

ASSOCIATES 

Robert Panara, '45 Earl Elkins, '46 

Christel Erdmann, '4 6 

REPORTERS and COLUMNISTS 

Caroline Tillinghast, '44 Carlie Todd. '44 
John Randolph, '4 5 Calvin George, '4 5 

Betty- Jo Raines, '46 Jean Smit.i. '4 6 

Ralph White, '46 Nadine Nichols, '46 

Earline Becker, '47 Thomas Filler, '47 

Mervin Garretson, '47 

BUSINESS MANAGER Calv.n George, '4C 

ASS'T BUSINESS MANAGER . Donald Padden, '4£ 
CIRCULATION MANAGER . Harold Steinman, '4 6 
ADVERTISING MANAGER . . Charles Pollock, '44 

ASS'T ADV. MANAGERS . Fran!: Sladek, '46 

Way at Zcalieff, P. C. 

PRINTERS 
Leonard J. Meyer, '41, FOREMAN 
William Brightwell, '46 Jason Amnions, '47 
Bertt Lependorf, '44 7 :yr.o Furlong, '46 

Charles Pollock, 44 

PROOFREADER Eugene Schick, '47 




WE WANT YOUR HELP I 



Editor of 
written us 
the urgent 
is difficult 



Mr. Winfield S. Runde, Alumni 
The Bvff and Blue, has repeatedly 
letters asking' us to please mention 
need of material for his page. It 
for him to cover the entire country since not 
all actions get i:i touch with him. The Alumni 
Page mtake.s excellent reading, even for those 
who are in no way connected with the college 
alumni 

neutral in his inclusion of items, and by adding 
human interest to his stories. He writes what- 
ever reaches his desk; how can he fill up the 
pages wit j a scarcity of material.' He does not 
get paid for his work which undoubtedly re- 
quire;; : rach of his time. 



j:i i:i .:^:; ... m;; 1 .; . :. :.:.:,!;i:i.i .ii:,.!!!;,!;;.:!!! ^Lun.;!: 1 .::!!,: ;;;:i:i :;:,.; i,i!:..ii :: ; : ni!..!:: . 

| As We See It | 

Jean Smith, '46 

= . ' '!-.'■' : :■ "i ':. ,'.: i ; .:!;':Mii i, ; ;' .! . , ; i:::,-'!i ,i.iM.;:i!i; i ;i!,; : M.i mi:,im !■:., Mil ;,: .:, ■ ~ 

Presented here are two com- 
] positions written by members 
m )f the Freshman class in Eng- 
! iish. "Self-Analysis" is print- 
ed here in condensed form. 
THE PATH FROM 
YESTERDAY 
"#■■ j^^^^H A year I 

■0^ I somewhere between the realm 

of a high school student and a 
. .„.,.... :• illi'L's- co-ed. The road was 
not smooth. I stumbled over 
algelbra, tore my new cloak of importance on the 
barbed wit of the Freshmen, and sank into a quag- 
mire of despair at the scandalized attitude of 
Dean Peet when she found that I could neither 
understand signs nor read her lips. Besides all 
this I was plagued by a deep nostalgia for the life 
I had left behind and from which I knew I was 
growing further and further away. To me the 
1 reparatory year was merely a bog to be crossed 
in order to reach firmer ground and an oppor- 
tunity to go ahead. Yet the newness of it, its 
touch of adventure, and the new friends I found 
here provided compensation. 

Now I have struck pavement and am rolling 
along more happily. Oh, it is true that at times 
I wish I could develop a sudden cold to keep from 
from having to go swimming, and that 1 become 
very tired of this stuffy Fowler Hall classroom 
but as a whole, college is fun. My courses are not 
so difficult this year and most of them are ex- 
tremely interesting. I have made many new friends, 
and though I miss those left behind, I have learn- 
ed to live without them just as they have adjusted 
themselves to live without me. 

I do not know where my road will lead from 
here, nor am I particularly anxious to know. 
Though my eyes are on a fairly definite destina- 
tion, I shall not try to map out a one-way route 
to reach it. Nor am I so narrow minded as to 
refuse to change one goal, snould another seem 
certain to offer me greater happiness. I shall go 
ahead mile by mile, not along the paths of least 
resistance, but over those that promise richest 
scenery and the straightest and truest course to 
my ultimate goal. — Earline Becker 




tions? .. .Norwood was traveling dreamily on his 
way home for the holidays, forgetting to trans- 
fer. He later woke up to the startling fact that he 
was still far from home, and had to take another 
train back. . . Chapin and Schmidt will in all prob- 
ability be a familiar sight along with the other 
Chapel step-sitters next spring. . . 

We hear it said that Santa 
Claus left a rocking horse for 
Riddy, a pair of handcuffs for 
C. Burg and Stanley, and a 
book on "Ho'w to Debate Rea- 
sonably" for Paffy. Who 
wants to argue with the obvi- 
ous? 

A ik .lamieson why he was 
blushing so furiously one day 
"'^| at work. Ten to one, he'll tell 
you... J ust try telling James 
that haste makes waste. According to his deep, 
dark theory, 'tis better to be fast than too slow. . . 
Maybe Mally doesn't have a will, but what a way! 
One recent day in the D S. she was doing the Con- 
ga, the rhumba, or maybe it was a New York Spe- 
cial ... Something new has been added, and it's 
now "Aunt Cussy" . . .Rather accurate sources have 
it that Milwaukee breweries are all sold out since 
the Xmas rush. And all the time we were thinking 
Smiffy went to Wisconsin just to show Professor 
Drake that Love and Chemistry do mix... Who 
said that Nero and the Wolfman were only ficti- 
tious? ... Kubis started the New Year right .by 
being the nearest thing to a bigamist, accepting 
two dates for the same time. Or could he have 
been figuring on safety in numbers? 

Reader's Dri-Jest 

Caroline Tillinghast, '44 



!i;!iii:!!ii!:i!liiiili!i!ii:!:;;.;i. : .,i'm 






Campus Chatter { 

Betty-Jo Raines, '46 & Ralph White, '46 f 




SELF-ANALYSIS 



which the members of the Gallandet College 



First of all, I want it to be known that I do 

not ordinarily get down into a corner to give 

Mr. Runde aims to please, by being myself the once-over. However, I presume life 

would be much better, in general, if I did just 
that more often. I will now proceed to put down 
my self-analysis, straight from the shoulder bar- 
ring nothing and to the best of my knowledge. 

My first question to myself is this: Have I 

taken advantage of the fine academic training 

courses that have been offered to me? At times, I 

think so and at other times I don't. During my pre- 

T/u Buff and Blue is the only means through iparatory year, I took more care with my lessons 

and had better study habits. This year, I find 

I have so much on my hands that I do not know 

Alumni may inform themselves of the activities where to start and usually end up by not accom- 

,, , „ , TJ! plishi.ng anything at all. I have yet to leam how 

o* others throughout the country. If no one tQ m& ou twenty . four hours a day . 

weu interested enough in the paper to send in now, I will take up the social point of view. I 

items concerning their activities and accomplish- ,broke ' a11 stay-at-home records last year and as 

a result I did not learn to know one-half of the 

ments, then the Alumni Page would exist only student body, especially the residents of College 

• memorv Hall. While at home last summer, I seriously 

- *' thought this over, and decided that socially speak- 

Another suggestion made by Mr. Runde is ing; my preparatory year had been a complete 

that of having the Normal graduates subscribe failure - This ? ear , 1 find myself somewhat handi- 
capped from my lack of knowing a great many 
to The Buff and Blue, After all, they owe it to students in this college, but feel that my social 
the eollege to keep alive whatever interest in the standing is on the upgrade now, although there 

° is much need for improvement. — Ruby Miller 
college and its activities as may have existed. 

Through the Alumni Page, also, they may obtain 
first-hand information of other Normal gradu- 
ates. 

Members of the Alumni and Normals, do we 
have your support? The time for you to show 
it is NOW! Send in your subscriptions, and 
pester the Alumni Editor with letters of infor- 
mation ! 






She laid a pale and still white 
form 
Beside the others there — - 
And then her anguished pierc- 
ing snriek, 
Rang through the silent air. 
With yet another mournful wail 
She turned upon one leg; — 
Tomorrow she'll come back 
again 
And lay another egg. 

AO A 

A LESSON IN CHEMISTRY 

"I want some consecrated lye,'' said the cus- 
tomer. 

"You mean 
druggist. 

"It does nutmeg any difference 
torted. "That's what I camphor, 
does it sulphur? " 

"Bright fellow, aren't you? I've never cinna 
rnon with so much wit." 

"Yeah — and as yet ammonia beginner at it." 

AaA 



concentrated lye," corrected the 



the man re- 
"How much 



The Hurdy Gurdy 

Nadine Nichols, '46 & John Randolph, '45 



FREEDOM OF THE PRESS 




With the Christmas vacation 
over and the students filing 
slowly 'back to classes, their 
faces permeated with gloom, 
one wonders what sort of a va- 
cation had passed for them. 
AH undoubtedly had welcomed 
The best way to enjov the rights of democracy the vacation as a relief from 

is to put them into practice. Of the four free- the monotony of college life 

^ ^ . i. e., a life of study. Some went 

doms, we are concerned at this moment with home t0 » ma ma," others visited 

freedom of the press. There is no better medium on their own, and the rest 

than the press through which persons or organ- sta y ed benind at collc ^ e t0 carr y on some sem " 

. T ^ , , , blance of life on Kendall Green. 

izations can express their ideas. 1 eople should The c , hristmas vacation was a (<dandy „ for those 

be aware of the changes that take place around here The y0U ng men took advantage of the oppor- 
them, in ideas as well as in events. A man does tunity to take their girls out every afternoon. The 

not begin to live until he thinks for himself and final climax was tne New Year?s Part y wMch was 

. . Till truly a hilarious affair. Small wonder then that 

acts as his mind dictates. However, he should the students Slhould come back t0 class with faint 

have a reservoir for ideas and suggestions from traces of a scowl on their faces. 

James and Yates apparently have their eyes on 

Case, but it's a Case of whether they can get her 

or not... What's this we hear about Lupo and 

Stecker taking control of Brightwell and Sladek? 

Could this by chance be due to leap year condi- 



which to draw his own conclusions, and the press 
offers him just that. It is especially during times 
like these when we should hang on tenaciously 
to our precious birthright, freedom! 



HUMOR (?) 

Hall Jr.: Now watch the blackboard while I run 
through it again. 

ACDA 

The minister had just finished an excellent chick- 
en dinner. As he looked out of the window, a 
rooster strutted across the yard. 

"My," said the minister, "That is certainly a 
proud rooster." 

"Yes, sir," said the host, "he has reason to be. 
One of his sons has just entered the ministry." 

AnA 

A Scotchman once called upon a doctor with 
great agitation. "Come quickly," he cried. "Ma 
wee child has swallowed a sixpence!" 

"How old is it?" asked the Doctor. 

"1894," replied the canny Scot. 

ADA 

VERY 

A very little fly, 

A vinegar jug; 

A very slippery edge, 

A very pickled bug. . . . 

AoA 

Throughout the year we sit in class 
like this, but when it comes to exam time, 
wetrytositlikethis. 

ADA 

Prep : . . er . . 

Frosh: Uhuh. 

Soph: Yeah. 

Jr: Surely. 

Sr: After carefully considering the matter pro 
and con and taking each possibility into consider- 
ation, and granting that my powers of comprehen- 
sion are functioning properly, I may answer to 
the affirmative. 

ADA 

Here' a tip for ye I. D. Studes 

"The electric chair is an example of period 
furniture — because it ends a sentence." 

The P. & P. 
AoA 
Willie looks from left to right 
And minds the safety rule; 
So that's how Willie gets his grades, 
A copyin' at school. 

The Clipper 




Well, here we are all to- 
gether again, and we are hop- 
ing each and everyone enjoyed 
his Christmas vacation to the 
utmost. 

Vacation didn't bring many 
of our old friends to the 
Green, but we did get glimpses 
of Leon Baker, '42, now teach- 
ing in Virginia, and Frank 
Sullivan j '41, now in West 
Virginia. 
Dr. Elizabeth Peet spent the holidays with old 
friends, Mr. and Mrs. Henry R. Sutphen, in Long 
Island. Ever since she began her career here at 
Gallaudet, she has spent Christmas week with her 
friends, with the exception of only two years. 

Mr. Frank Doctor, brother of our Dr. Powrie 
Doctor, visited him and their mother during the 
vacation. He took a great deal of time out to 
renew old acquaintances among his Kansas friends 
on the Green, and to make many new ones among 
us college students. 

Miss Hazel Manahan, '42, 
turned up at the New Year's 
Eve Dance in the Old Jim, and f 
made merry with us for a few 
minutes. At present she is a 
supervisor at the American I 
School for the Deaf in Connec- ...,„ 
ticut and seems to enjoy her JC«- 

job. 

To the north, south, east. 
and west went many college i Pj 

students for the Christmas va- 
cation, some to their homes, and some to visit 
others. They all returned to Gallaudet with 
smiling faces and a pleasant vacation behind them. 




The Poet's Pack 

Contributions Made by the Student Body 



'Tis three weeks after Christmas . . . and accord- 
ingly, there are no "visions of sugar plums danc- 
ing" in Helen Louise Moss' head: 

LOST VISION 

Up, up the mountain-side 

High and steep; — 

Up, up from the valleys 

Dark and deep; — 

Below, unknown monsters, 

Breathing fire' — 

Above, soft golden light, — 

Heart's desire! 

The path is oh! so hard — 

On I creep — 

Then, opening one eye, 

Wake from sleep. 



A word to the wise. . .from the wise. Jean 
Smith. '4 6, makes another contribution to the Pack. 

LINES TO A CAMPUS LOAFER 

If frozen stares could stop clocks, 
My friend, time would stand still. 
It's true you have a winning smile 
But your face is fit to kill. 

If relaxation was what it takes 
To acquire a degree, 
Then, clad in cap and gown, old pal, 
You 'd get your honorary A. B. 

If corny jokes and drug store cokes 
Were classed as vitamin A 
Then I can see that you would be 
Health champ of U. S. A. 

Life like yours is oh, so nice, 
But when all's said and done, 
What have you to crow a'bout 
After each setting sun? 



NUMBSKULL 

I know the dullest girl around 
She's a stupid little chipper. 
She didn't get it when I said: 
"My soap's my bedroom slipper." 

HOW ELSE? 

I've seen odd signs, but the queerest one 
That I have seen of late, 
Was one I saw in a barber-shop: 
"Haircut while U wait." 

Ruby Miller, '47 



A PRINT-SHOP STORY 

A number of years ago your writer worked on 
a daily paper in Asbury Park, N. J. The editor 
of the "sheet" insisted on only one thing — that the 
paper never ibe "put to hed" until he had furnished 
a verse of poetry to top the editorial column. For- 
getting his demand, the editor did not show up 
one night, and the composing room inserted a 
famous line from the "English Gentleman" — 
Time and tide staiyeth for no man. 



Thursday, December 16, 1943 



The Buii and Blue 



PAGE THREE 



|l||||||lillillllllllllllllllUllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHllillllillilllllliililliilli]lll« 

SPOUT SLANTS 

sss by Lyle Wiltse 



C'mon, Blue Bisons, we're for you 

When "c'est fini," 'twill .be nothing to rue — 

Gallaudet is rooting for her trustworthy team 

Victories are scheduled — comin' in on the beam. 

Take 'em and leave 'em — lying in the gutter, 

Beat 'em and send 'em — home to their mudder. 

Steal the ball with a smile — lose it with a grin, 

Someone's gotta lose — someone's gotta win! 

So Rah! Rah! for the Buff — Rah! Rah! for the Blue 

The Bisons are tough! They'll prove it too! 

— Nadine Nichols, '46. 

The above timely bit of poetry contributed by Miss Nichols speaks 
for itself as to the general attitude of the Gallaudet student body. 
The Blues have experienced a rather steady drubbing to date in 
basketball. Lady Luck and Dame Fortune, where art thou? As for 
the future, the crystal ball is yet clouded over, and all the while, 
the Conference date is drawing nigh. However, the issue was much 
the same last year when the Blues copped the crown after a glorious 
campaign that rocked the sport world on its heels. History often 
repeats itself. The powerful Randolph-Macon quint, worthy op- 
ponents of yesteryear, is no longer in the limelight, having disbanded 
for lack of civilian material. We are still up against at least two 
powerful Conference opponents in the Catholic University and the 
Mount St. Mary's College teams this season. And then possibly in 
the Delaware University team. So far the boys have been playing 
with non-college teams such as the Quantico Marine Base squad, the 
Fort Meade soldiers, and others. The Quantico Marines were the 
national champions last year in basketball. A mighty, formidable 
outfit. There is still a considerable amount of time with yet many 
games on schedule between now and the dates of the Mason-Dixon 
Conference in Baltimore, March 2, 3, and 4. So -come on, you guys! 
Burn up the maple and see if you can t bounce in with the bacon a 
bit more often from now on. 

The best defense is a good offense. Gus Q. Fan would like to see 
more offensive strategy employed within the ranks of the thunder- 
ing herd. Not even a sixty-ton tank nor twenty of them spewing 
hot steel could stop the charging mass of flesh for which you are 
named. Be a little more slick with your biscuit hooks. Let's not 
let one little mole hill of defeatism grow into a mountain! An' 
there's that little gremlin that sidles up to you and whispers, "You 
have been practicing steadily for weeks now. Why not take time out 
for a little snooze just this once?" Ignore him. You may impersonate 
Rip Van Winkle to your heart's content when and if you have 
brought home the laurels! 



Washington's recent flu epidemic scored a regular technical knock- 
out over Gallaudet's boxers and their expectant rooters last month 
when just two nights before the meet in Joe Turner's arena. "Mighty 
Mite" Marvin Marshall was stricken ill with this ding parasite, forc- 
ing him to forfeit in the 12 6-pound class of the Senior division. The 
same misfortune overtook 'Tom Rippe, Gallaudet's 160 pound novice. 
Both boys expect to be in the ring in the A.A.U. finals in March and 
are already taking extensive training in the bowling alley of Old Jim. 
With such new equipment as has been installed there, they should be 
well tuned up by March. The new equipment is one striking bag 
used to develop speed and coordination and on punching bag to de- 
velop the art of landing solid punches where it hurts most. 



There has been a ping-pong tournament under the management of 
Roy Holcomb going on steadily in the Lyceum for as long back as we 
can remember. Just how soon, if ever, are they going to complete 
aforesaid tournament and announce the new champion of College 
Hall? We wonder. 



Gallaudet College Blue Bisons 
Basketball Schedule 

Friday, January 28— Johns Hopkins University 

At Tech High School Court 
Friday, February 11 — American University 

At Roosevelt High School Court 
Friday, February 18 — Loyola College 

At Roosevelt High School Court 
Friday, February 25 — University of Delaware 

At Roosevelt High School Court 

Admission: Adults, 75c including tax — Children (8-12) 25c 
Service Men, 40c 



.C311llllitilllC31lllllllllilCailllllllIlIIC3llllllli:iliC3IIIIlIilllllC3IIIIIIlIIIIIC3IIIIIIIIIEEIS:2Iifi!£ 



I GALLAUDET 



PHARMACYI 



\ Phone Atlantic 8888 

| 1000 Flordia Ave., N. E. - Washington, D. G. 

lllliimUIMM IIIOII MIC] IIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIOIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIII L- 



Blue Cagers Score 
Over Fort Myer 

Gallaudet's Blues staged a wide 
open, all-out victory over the Fort 
Myer soldier team Friday .eve- 
ning, January 7, in the Roose- 
velt High School gym. It was vir- 
tually no contest, for the thunder- 
ing herd downed all opposition 
and zoomed up to a final 51-12 
scoring. When it became appar- 
ent that there was little risk in 
the venture, Coach Sullivan gave 
every man of the fifteen-man team 
a chance to make a showing for 
himself on the floor, in groups, 
first the regulars who ran away 
with the score at the start, then 
the first string of subs and the 
second stringers in succession who 
kept the man at the score board 
as busy as an alley cat in a hor- 
net's nest, switching digits. The 
Fort Myer boys strove hard to 
keep the score within reasonable 
bounds, but the Blues were too 
fast and elusive for them. It was 
definitely no match. The slaugh- 
ter reached 28-2 proportions at 
the first half. 

As a preliminary game, Gal- 
laudet's Preparats squelched the 
Kendall School quint 21-11 in a 
wild game that reached football 
semblances. 

Gallaudet FG FT TP 

Holcomb, f 6 1 13 

Stanley, f 10 2 

Broz, f 10 2 

Baldridge, f 3 6 

Mortensen, f 5 10 

Ruge, f 10 2 

Schleiff, c 

Witczak, c 10 2 

Leitson, c 113 

Massey, g 

Fishier, g 113 

Samples, g 

Padden, g 2 4 

Amnions, g 113 

Goodwin, g 10 2 

Totals — 24 4 52 
Port Myer FG FT TP 

Hobbs. f 10 2 

Askin, f 

Beck, f 10 2 

Caldwell, c 10 2 

Patterson, c 1 

Stratta, g 12 4 

Weisgarber, g 3 3 

Goska, g 

Totals — 3 6 12 

V 

XMAS ACTIVITY 



(Continued from page 1) 



Fowler Hall on Sunday, Decem- 
ber 2 6, and the regular Calling 
Hour was also held that evening. 
After all the excitement preced- 
ing Christmas, the students were 
content to spend Monday evening 
dancing or playing games in 
Chapel Hall. On Tuesday, Decem- 
ber 28, a group from the Naval 
Communications Bureau chal- 
lenged our varsity team in a bas- 
ketball game in the Old Jim. The 
game was fast and furious, and 
no doubt was one of the most 



f 1 1 1 j 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 ] 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 B 1 1 1 r i ' i * p -u 

LITTLE 1 

9th St., South otf G = 

Hearing aids for most seats! E 

First Run & Revivals = 
See Daily Papers for Programs = 



Co-eds Carry On 
Fencin^Program 

The first fencing meet of the 
winter season took place in the 
Old Jim December 15 at 8 p. m. 
when the Gallaudet w o jm e n 
fencers met the team from the 
George Washington University. 
Only the veterans on the Gallau- 
det team took part in the meet 
as the new memibers had not yet 
had enough practice. The Gallau- 
det team was made up of Frances 
Todd, Julia Burg, Caroline Til- 
linghast, and Mary Sladek, all of 
whom are members of the Senior 
class. 

In counting the matches won, 
the two teams tied; but Gallau- 
det came out on top with a total 
of 5 4 touches to that of 41 for 
the George Washington Univer- 
sity. Julia Burg led her team, 
winning all of her matches. The 
teams were quite evenly matched, 
and the meet was one of the high- 
lights for the Gallaudet fencing 
group. 

The George Washington fenc- 
ing group is led by Mrs. Goldman, 
a veteran fencer. The Gallaudet 
group is managed by Miss Til- 
linghast. The group had been 
under the able direction of Mrs. 
Douglas Keys, nee Margaret Yp- 
der, until recently when she left 
to be married. The group owes 
much to her assistance and in- 
struction, for she had been their 
leader for several years and had 
built up the team to make it one 
of the best women's sports teams 
on the campus. The group in- 
tends to keep on this year, on 
their own. Plans for the future 
have not been definitely made, 
but it is expected that Gallaudet 
will continue to have a fencing 
group for the next few years be- 
cause of the great interest shown 
by the coeds in the sport, both 
as fencers and as spectators. 

The group enjoyed the fine 
competition given by the George 
Washington fencers and hopes to 
have another match with them. 
Though most of the arrange- 
ments were taken care of by Mrs. 
Keys in the past, the girls intend 
to continue their matches with 
other colleges as much as possible 
and hope to have a very success- 
ful year. 

exciting basketball games witness- 
ed in the Old Jim for a long time, 
even though we did come out 
second. Wednesday, December 29, 
volley ball and other games were 
played under the auspices of the 
Athletic Association. Next on the 
list of activities was a movie 
program held in Chapel Hall 
December 30. This movie pro- 
gram was a welcome addition to 
the holiday activities, and fea- 
tured "The Return of the Grey 
Wolf," plus a comdy entitled 
"Should Men Walk Home?" 

As the new year approached, 
many of the students who had 
gone home began to return, and 
there was a fairly large group 
on hand for the annual New 
witnessed something novel in the 
line of entertainment. On this 
evening, the students gathered in 



Compliments 
of the 

Curb Cafe 

714 H. St., N. E. 



Blue Bisons Suffer Defeat 
At Hands of Ft. Meade 



Gallaudet's Blues streaked 
away to a rip-roaring start in 
points over the Fort Meade army 
team in the second game of the 
season held on the spacious floors 
of the Technical High School gym 
Wednesday evening, December 8. 
Apparently, however, those army 
lads were a bit too long-winded 
for our thundering herd which, 
after leading Iby a margin of six 
points throughout the first and 
second quarters, began to let up 
on its driving force and to lag 
gradually behind in the two final 
quarters until the finishing gun 
blazed away with the opponent's 
score chalked up to a 60-46 vic- 
tory over the Blues. 

Both teams showed superb pass- 
ing ability, but the Blues' defens- 
ive tactics were not quite up to 
par that evening as was demon- 
strated by the constant success- 
ful break-throughs of their de- 
fense zones by the opponents, 
who sank their ball home again 
and again. Those Fort Meade 
boys seemed past masters in the 
are of elusion, scooting the ball 
from hand to hand like greased 
lightning. 

Hoclomb led the Gallaudetians 
with seven field goals and Bald- 
ridge came in second with only 
five in spite of the high number 
of shots attempted by both 
players. 

Following the game, a dance 
Avas given on the floor with music 
furnished by the Army Band. So 
all the young lads and lassies in 
attendance had a bit o' swing 
fest before returning home to 
college. 

V 

FACULTY XMAS 



(Continued from page 1) 



a member of their family, Frank 
Doctor, of Kansas. Mr. Frank B. 
Smith, our printing instructor, 
went to New York City where he 
visited his son who is in the 
service. Coach English Sullivan 
and his wife were honored by a 
visit from the latter's parents, who 
remained over the vacation. The 
Sullivans also attended several 
parties. The highlight of their 
vacation came when the entire 
family visited the Kentucky State 
Club dance. Mrs. Thomas K. 
Kline spent half of her vacation 
acting as Dean of Women in the 
absence of Miss Peet. Mr. Goet- 
zinger, of the Normal Class, and 
his wife, newcomers to the na- 
tion's capital, spent their vacation 
visiting the various points of in- 
terest here in Washingon. The 
other members of the faculty 
seem to have chosen to remain 
comparatively quiet during their 
vacations, remaining at home with 
their families or catching up with 
their work. 



SHOP NEAR BY 



Gaffins 



Men's and Boys' Wear 



Dress and Sports Wear 




925 H Street, N. E. 



Phone TRindad 8833 



the Old Jim where games such 
as volley ball and blind man's 
Year's Eve dance. Saturday, 
January 1, was the first day of 
Leap Year, and the girls took 
advantage of the fact by treating 
the boys to a bowling party at 
the H Street bowling alleyia. 
"Open House" again was held in 
Fowler Hall on Sunday, Decem- 
ber 2. After Calling Hour that 
evening, the vacation came to a 
close. 

It is certain that all who re- 
mained at college through the 
vacation had every means at hand 
of having an enjoyable time. The 
student body wishes to thank the 
student committees, the chap- 
erons, and all others who did so 
much to make this a very pleas- 
ant holiday. 



ART.. 

MATERIALS « w» 



Quality 
Since 
1865 

MUTH 



THOMPSON'S 
BARBER SHOP 

Orleans Place near Fla. Ave. 
Hair Cut As You Like It 

50 cents 
Hours: 11 to 8 
9 to 9 Saturdays 



Organization Directory 

Associated Student 

Financial Department 

Pres Leonard Meyer, '44 

Vice-Pres Willis Ayers, '45 

Secy. . . . Donald Wilkinson, '4 5 

Treas Henry Krostoski, '45 

Asst. Treas. . . Frank Sladek, '46 

Dramatic Club 

Pres Paul Baldridge, '44 

Vice-Pres. . . Leander Moore, '44 

Secy Mervin Garretson, '47 

Treas Ralph White, '46 

Gallaudet College 

Athletic Association 

Pres Charles Pollock, '44 

1st V.-P. . . . Donald Padden, '45 

2nd V.-P. . Henry Krostoski, '45 

Secy Earl Elkins, '46 

Treas. . . . Marvin Marshall, '47 

Asst. Treas. . . . Lyle Wiltse, '46 

Gallaudet College Women's 

Athletic Association 

Pres Julia Burg, '44 

Vice-Pres Celia Burg, '45 

Secy Betty Jo Raines, '46 

Treas Earline Becker, '47 

Kappa Gamma Fraternity 

Grand Rajah . Bro. Baldridge, '44 

Kamoos Bro. Padden, '45 

Tahdheed Bro. Meyer, '44 

Mukhtar .... Bro. Krostoski, 45 

Literary Society 

Pres Ralph White, '46 

V.-Pres. . Warren Blackwell, '46 

Secy Mervin Garretson, '47 

Treas Marvin Marshall, '47 

Movie Club 

Pres Meyer Plotitsky, '44 

Vice-Pres. . Harold Steinman, '46 

Secy Byron Hunziker, '46 

Treas Marvin Marshall, '47 

O. W. L. S. 

Pres. . . Caroline Tillinghast, '44 

Vice-Pres Agnes Carr, '45 

Secy Jean Smith, '46 

Treas Marjorie Case, '46 

Librarian . . . Frances Lupo, '44 

Photography Club 

Pres Bertt Lependorf, '44 

Sc r-y-Treas. . Leonard Meyer, '44 
General Mgr. . W. Blackwell, 46 

Men's Reading Room Committee 

Chairman . Meyer Plotitsky, '44 
Secy. -Treas. . Jack Hensley, '45 

Thomas Berg, '44 

Willis Ayers, '45 

James Drake, '46 

Cecil Alms, '46 

Young Men's Social Club 

Pres Ralph White, '46 

Vice-Pres Jack Hensley, '45 

Secy Mervin Garretson, '47 

Treas Thomas Fishier, '47 

Young Women's Christian Asson. 

Pres Frances Lupo, '44 

V.-P. . . . Clarhelen Wilkins, '45 

Secy Nadine Nichols, '46 

Treas Aleat'ha Barnes, '46 

Lit. Chmn. . . Arlene Stecker, '44 
Asst. Chmn. . . Betty Stark, '45 

HONOR ROLL 



(Continued from page 1) 



honors. The Freshman class was 
third, with four names on the 
list, while the Preparatory and 
Sophomore Classes made a com- 
paratively poor showing with only 
two and one students, respective- 
ly. Those students who received 
the average grades of 2.5 or more 
are as follows: 

Seniors — Paul Baldridge, Thomas 
Berg, MalVine Fischer. Frances 
Lupo, Leander Moore, Meyer Plot- 
itsky, Caroline Tillinghast. 
Juniors — Celia Burg, Agnes Carr, 
Calvin George, Henry Krostoski, 
Donald Padden, Robert Panara, 
Betty Stark, Donald Wilkinson. 
Sophomore — Harold Steinman. 
Freshmen — Earline Becker, Nor- 
ma Bushey, Mervin Garretson, 
Keith Lange. 

Preparatory — Frances H a 1 1 e n, 
Audrey Watson. 



Jack's Meat Market 

922 7th St., N. E. 

Fancy Groceries, Fruit And 

Vegetables 

Beer and Wine 

J. Greenstein, Prop. 



PAGE FO JK 



The Buff and Blue 



Friday, January 21, 1944 



NEWS OF THE ALUMNI 



!ij W infield S. Kunde, '01 



♦ ■ » ♦ 

In the Oakland hills overlook- 
ing the city of Oakland, San Fran- 
cisco bay and the Golden Gate, 
lived Joaquin Miller, Poet of the 
Sierras, for many years. The 
large tree-covered estate has been 
deeded to Oakland as a public 
park. 

Each year the poet'.j daughter, 
Juanita, holds a reception at the 
"Abbey" in honor of the natal 
day of the man who thrilled the 
Court of St. James in the time of 
Victoria. At these gatherings 
on the estate, the poems of the 
poet are read. Many graduates 
of the College have visited the 
estate and shared the hospitality 
of Juanita. 

One of the poems that Califonr- 
nians of literary bent love to re- 
cite at Christmas time is the fol- 
lowing beautiful composition 
which excels in sheer imagery: 
A CALIFORNIA CHRISTMAS 
Behold where Beauty walks with 
Peace! 
Behold where Plenty pours her 
horn 
Of fruits, of flowerc, fat increase, 
As generous as Kght of morn. 
Green Shasta, San Diego, seas 
Of bloom and green between 
them rolled, 
Great herds in grasses to their 
knees, 
And green earth garmented in 
gold. 
White peaks that prop the sap- 
phire blue 
Look down to Edens, such as 
when 
That fair, first perfection knew 
And God walked perfect earth 
with men. 
I say God's Kingdom is at hand 
Right here, if we but lift our 
eyes; 
I say there lies no line or land 
Between this land and Para- 
dise. 

V 

Charles C Griffin '8 3, of 



Tonto Basin, Ariz., passed away 
at Globe, last November. This 
loaves Dr. Thomas F. Fox the 
cole survivor of the illustrious 
class. Charles entered the college 
from the District and upon grad- 
uation vent west, locating in 
Arizona. He was of a retiring 
nature and little was heard of 
his movements. It is said that 
he l:ved the silence of the desert, 
and 'hat he was an encyclopedia 
on the flora, reptile, insect, and 
animal life of that arid region. 
Alone he found that: 
"In quiet hours the tranquil soul 

Reflects the beauty of the sky; 
No passions rise or billows roll, 

And only God and heaven are 
nigh." 
V 

In the November 26 issue of 
the San Francisco Examiner Al- 
bert Berg, '8 6, was pictured in 
Ripley's "Believe it or Not." The 
caption proclaimed: "Albert Berg, 
a deaf-mute, wa? coach at Pur- 
due." 

V 

Alfred E. Stophfins, '24, aspire? 
to be an accountant and he no"<\ 
is with the Oklahoma City Doug- 
las plant doing office work. For 
years Alf was a steady employee 
of a construction eompauy that 
built the great ordnance plant at 
McAlester. When the company 
finished the job and moved else- 
where Alf elected to stay put in 
Oklahoma rather than travel 
around because he felt that it 
would be detrimental to the best 
interests of his three promising 
sons. There's a father for other 
fathers to emulate! 

V 

John W. Blattner, Jr., N-'24, is 
working for the Vultee Aircraft 
Company in Fort Worth, Texas 
Will always was fooling around 
machinery, so building motors is 
close to his heart. He seems to 
prefer single blessedness but 
maybe our guess is as good as 
yours — so his friends aver. 



Arlie Laicien Gray, '32, is an 
expert in the cable department 
of the Tulsa Douglas plant. He is 
said to be so particular and effi- 
cient that anything that passes 
his inspection never comes back. 
His wife (Thelma Dyer, '32 ) is 
also empolyed in the same plant, 
so together they are emulating 
the squirrel by laying up a com- 
petence against the time wnen 
their dreams of being in business 
on their own may come true. 
V 

Guard S. ± rice ; an ex, own., 
some land in Oklahoma which he 
thinks may yield black gold. But 
the government will not allow 
drilling for the present so Guard 
will guard his plot until that day 
of days arrives and he sees a 
gusher that may lift him into the 
happy lap of luxury. 

Coach Guy Aivin Calanie, '27, 
of the Oklahoma School, is now a 
classroom teacher where he is at 
home. His Lome is enlivened by 
six lovely, lively children which, 
it is said, explained the appear- 
ancj or a promising hoary crown. 
v. ay has been nourishing one 
cscret ambition — to coach a foot- 
ball team at his school that will 
make grease spots of the stal- 
warts of the Texas, Arkansas and 
Kansas Schools in a single sea- 
son! 

- — V 

Byron S. Baer, '42, as has been 
mentioned before, is working for 
a degree at the University of 
Maryland. At present he is tak- 
ing courses in differential and 
integral calculus and organic 
laboratory work. He also is 
studying German. May his la- 
bors reflect credit upon himself 
and Gallaudet. 



W. Theodore G rifling, '24, is 
back on the Oklahomaii as a 
columnist and his advent has 
provoked thunderous applause of 
the editors of the school papers 
throughout the United States. 
Ted has a style of writing that is 
all his own. Without his stuff 
the Oklahomaii reminded one of 
the "lost chord." Journalists of 
the Ted stamp reflect the quality 
of grey matter that speaks for the 
school. No school should over- 
look potential possibilities among 
its personnel — where writing is 
second nature and enunciations 
carry convincing enlightenment. 
A school publication is a potent 
propaganda medium which pro- 
claims the quality of the work 
the school is carrying on. 

Vern Barnett, '20, so the 
Hartford New Era says, makes a 
bee line for New York on his day 
off to take in the top plays that 
are staged each week. Vern also 
likes operas, which of course re- 
quires hearing to some degree, so 
he is the envy of those of his 
friends to whom sound is but a 
memory. United Aircraft of 
Hartford has this movie fan on 
its payroll. 

V 

Cyrus L. Cover, N-'40, is teach- 
ing in the Texas School. Last 
summer he was forced to submit 
to the surgeon's scalpel and still 
is convalescing. He will have to 
remain away from his school 
duties for some time. May his 
recovery be rapid — which is the 
fervent wish of his many friends. 

Lloyd Harrison, N-'38, on leave 
from the California School, is 
still in the United States Navy 
as an istructor of the staff of 



the Pacific Fleet Schools. While 
at the Berkeley School, Lloyd 
was one of the most popular em- 
ployees on the campus. His good 
nature was always the magnet 
that drew to him the high and 
the low. He is greatly missed at 
his school. 

. v 

Raphaelina Martino. '32, and 
Rhoda Clark Jones, '39, attend 
evening classes in metallurgy at 
the United Aircraft Corporation, 
Hartford. Nothing like improv- 
ing one's future — for is it not 
said that he who stands still falls 
back? 

V — 

A surprise party was staged by 
thirty-five friends of the Leslie A. 
Elmers ('11 — '14] it their lovely 
new home in Knoxviile, Tenn., 
in honor of the good man's wife, 
Bertha. After "500" and games 
delightful refreshments ot ice 
cream and snacks were served. 
Then came speeches and pre- 
sentation of a handsome chrome 
I waffle set. The whole affair was 
staged in the garden patio which 
Leslie has converted into an open- 
air living room — complete with 
barbecue outfit and all the para- 
phernalia that goes into such a 
place to make a complete and 
inviting atmosphere of luxury and 
abandon. 

— V 

William Henry Chambers, for- 
mer student of the long ago, has 
been teaching in the Tennessee 
School ever since he bid good- 
bye to the College campus. Re- 
cently good friends and true gave 
him and his better half a sur- 
prise party in honor of the wife's 
natal day. "Five hundred" was 
enjoyed till the traditional cake 
with blazing candles was cere- 
moniously brought in, much to 
the delight and astonishment of 
the recipient. 

William is the oldest teacher 
at the school. In fact he has 
been there so long that he knows 
practically every former pupil — 
hence he is considered a very 
necessary contributor to the 
alumni page of the Observer. 

___ y 

Kenneth C. Burdett. '34, and 
wife Aftoh Curtis, (ex-'38) were 
in Berkeley, Cal., during the 
Christmas holidays, visiting Ken- 
neth's sister. Kenneth is instruc- 
tor of printing at the Ogden, 
Utah School. Afton holds down 
a position as office assistant in 
the Army Supply Depot in the 
same city. 

V 

Rosie Fong, '39, Norma Strick- 
land, '42, and Hazel Davis, ex- 
'38, are key punchers in the 
Richmond, (Cal.) Kaiser ship- 
yards. Hazel is the daughter of 
Robert L. Davis, '09, alumni edi- 
tor of the Lone Star, Austin, 
Texas. 

— V 

It is understood that Richard 
G. Brill, N-'36, now a lieutenant 
(j.g. ) will soon be advanced to 
that of Captain of a subchaser. 
Dick is on leave as principal of 
the Virginia School. His new son 
Tommy is growing fast and seems 
to possess all the characteristics 
of both of his splendid parents. 



FAMOUS CLO SE -^HAVES By Barb er So. 

PUFFAL0 BiLL WRILL,., buffalo bill, porting supplies was at- 

| TACKED BY INDIANS. HE KILLED MANV BUT HIS AMMUNITION RAN 
OUT JUST AS THE INDIANS MADE A FINAL THRUST. A UNIT OF 
ARMY CAVALRY ARRIVED AND DISPERSED THE ATTACKERS. 




SAFE AT BLAST... adrift for 

7<b DAYS, UNCONSCIOUS WILL COBON 
WAS SPOTTED BY AN AMERICAN 
FREIGHTER. SUSPECTING A TRAP, 
THEY SHOT AT THE RAFT/ FOR- 
TUNATELY MISSING. SOMEONE 
SAW COBON MOVE AND FINALLY 
HE WAS RESCUED. 



BARBER $01 SAYS: & 

THREE TERMITES ( / 

MAD A SPILL C/ 

ONE IS GONE ^ ' 
TWO SOON WILL 

BUY MORE BONDS 




4T A SHOT-PUT MEET an op- 
ponent threw A IbLB. IRON BAL. 
WILDLY. CONTESTANT MITCH AYRES 
WAS SAVED WHEN A GUST Or WIND 
CAUSED KIM TO BLINK AND TURN 
HIS HEAD INSTINCTIVELY. THE 
BALL MISSED HiS HEAD BY A 
FRACTION. 



The Christmas card received 
from the Brills shows young Tom- 
my in his high chair, head 
crowned by abundant curly hair, 
chin up, eyes concentrated on 
somebody — the exact pose of 
Dick, as we knew him_ in the 
classroom observing the pupils' 
work. 

Will Rogers, '40, was a visitor 
in Berkeley during the Christmas 
holidays. He came all the way 
from Kansas where he presides 
over a classroom in Olathe. 
V 

Lester Naftaly, ex-' 3 6,, after 
two long years and suspense, 
heard from his brother who is 
in Manila saying that Lester's 
parents are well and safe at a 
concentration near tke eity. Les- 
ter made it known that the news 
was "the best Christmas feiff ' 
since the Japs seized the Philip- 
pines and he had been unable to 
contact his loved ones. 

Leo Jacobs, '38, when not on 
duty as one of the counsellors at 
the Berkeley school, has a fond- 
ness for taking movies of places 
and objects that strike his fancy. 
V 

Louis B. Sorenson, '36, is em- 
ployed at the Oakland, (Cal.) 
Moore Dry Docks. Recently he 
was advanced to the position of 
"expeditor" with increase in 



Compliments 
Class of '47 



pay. Last June Louis, feeling 
that man should not live alone 
took unto himself a hearing wife 
and now, when he returns from 
work, instead of a cheerless 
bachelor's room he is greeted 
with open arms by his loving- 
bride — and a steaming hot din- 
ner. 

V 

The city of San Diego, Cal. 
long a sleepy town, has grown 
by leaps and bounds since the 
war. Now it is one of the livest 
cities in the U. S. During the 
past two years over one hundred 
thousand new residents have been 
rgistered. Not a few deaf people 
from other parts of the country 
have flocked to the city by the 
•sea. Among those who formerly 
resided on Kendall Green are: 
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Round- 
tree, ex-'35, from Arkansas; 
Clyde Houze, ex'21, from Syra- 
cuse; N. Y.; John C. Clesson, '13, 
Colorado. Clyde is a machinist 
(civilian) at North Island Air 
Station, just off San Diego. 
John was a classmate of Wil- 
bur and Mary Gledhill, '13, and 
they had not met in thirty years. 
When they happened to meet 
at a wrestling bout one night 
they got the surprise of their 
lives. After a second look all 
declared that each and every 



one had hardly changed an iota! 
And so they fell to reminiscing of 
the good old days at Gallaudot 
and the time John and Wilbur 
grappled in a National Guard 
tournament for the Welterweight 
Championship of the District of 
Columbia. At that time, so we 
are informed, Alpha W. Patter 
son, '14, wrestled as a feather- 
weight in the same tournament. 
And, by the way, Wilbur is a 
linotyper on a San Diego daily. 
Daughter Doris — a rare beauty, 
believe us — is married and has 
a one-year old daughter. Her 
husband is employed by the 
Lockheed-Vega Aircraft Company 
of Burbank, Cal. That is, for 
your information, the town wheie 
abodes the great Jim Jeffries, 
former heavyweight pugilist of 
the World. 

V 

Michael Sullivan, ex-'87, and 
wife live in San Diego. Although 
82 years of age, Michael is hale 
and hearty and wonderfully spry 
for his advanced years. His 
memory, we are informed, is like 
a movie. He harkens back to his 
life on Kendall Green and reels 
on and on, in an absorbing man- 
ner, all through the years of 
strife and peace, recalling to 
vivid memory faces and activities 
of persons and personages whom 
he had seen or about whom he 
had read. Michael has lived V, e 
good life and now in the evening 
of existence, he plods along the 
road toward the setting sua, 
smiling a s he goes, confident of 
paradise further on. 



SOPHOMORE CONCERT 

(Continued from page 1) 



an account of Christmas Day, the 
Twenty-third Psalm was signed 
responsively by Marjorie Case and 
Frank Sladek. Aleatha Barnes 
gave an appropriate peaceful ren- 
dition of "Silent Night, Holy 
Night." "The History of Christ- 
mas" was the subject presented 
by Cecil Alms in a brief talk. 
Marilyn Hughes naively went 
through "O' Little Town of Beth- 
lethem." Harold Steinman out- 
lined the whats and wherefores 
of Christmas in his talk,"What 
Is Christmas?" Warren Black- 
well then closed the program with 
a prayer. 



Leap Year Dance 

Given by Co-eds 
Under Auspices of YWCA 
Saturday, February 19, in 

Old Jim 

From 9 P. M. to 1 A. M. 

Admission: $1.50 per coupl^ 

Entertainment Included 






Woodward & Loth 

11 & F St., N. W. 



CASSON STUDIO 



Photographers of the 1943 Buff and Blue 



1305 Conn. Avenue, N. W. 



DEcatur 1333 



— ^\ 



NORTHEAST 
CARD SHOP 

GBEETINO CARDS 

Stationery Gifts 
Photo- Work 
651 H St., N. E. 



1228 H. St., N. E., AT 0354 

FELDMAN'S 
The Store For Distinctive Jewelry 
Watches Diamonds Silverware 

(Repairing of All Kinds) 



Mrs. Geo. L. Sutton 

Mrs. L. Sutton Bailey 

ATlantic 115 3 

PEOPLES 

FLOWER SHOP 

"Say It With Flowers" 

900 H Street, N. E. 



<llllli!IC]lllllll!l!ii[]llllll!l!!!l£]|ll!llllll!!nillllllllllli:3lllllllll!!IC3!lilllll!l!IC3llll!l!i!:: 



• * 



utued-l 




MET. 4800 



:!!IIIC]||llllllllll[3IIIIIIIII]llC3lllllllll!lli:3IIIIIIIIIIIIC3lllllll!IIIIC]llllll!li:iini:i!lll!iil|[]!ll!lllll 



Pleity at, Padteld 



your new woolen dresses to start the year. 
Color, muted as violins, refreshing as spring 
i'" Ids, tender as fringing willow, pastels you 
want to wear under your coat now, bring forth 
resplendently later. Carlye has designed a wool 
dress for you who wear Junior Miss sizes in 
pastels as delicate as dogwood blossoms. Gilt 
nailhcads mingle with white felt appliqued 
scrollwork running across the shoulders and 
down the front «25 



W&L— Junior Misses' Apparel, Fourth Floor 



Mason-Dixon Oonf. 
Hal to., March 2 



T 



JLJJC 




Thunder On, Blue 
Bisons, lo Victory 



Volume LI I, Number 8. 



GALLAUDET COLLEGE, KENDALL GREEN, WASHINGTON, D. C 



Friday, February 18, 1!)44 



Six Words" Theme of Dr. HalVs Lecture 



An interested audience gath- 
ered in Chapel Hall on Sunday 
evening, January 23, when Dr. 
Percival Hall delivered an in- 
structive lecture entitled "Six 
Words." The six words which Dr. 
Hall discussed were: Know Thy- 
self, Control Thyself and Give 
Thyself. These six words, he ex- 
plained, represent three different 
philosophies of life, the first from 
the Greeks, the second from the 
Romans and the third from the 
Christian ideal. The text of his 
talk was of such interest and im- 
portance to everyone that the 
main part will be quoted in full: 

"To know thyself is of great 
importance. Some believe that 
we are exactly what our ancestors 
have made us through inherit- 
ance. While there is some truth 
in this, as to tendencies of long- 
evity, stature, and other physical 
and mental traits, we should not 
assume that our future is fixed at 
our birth. Some say that man is 
what he eats and that, therefore, 
if we know what we eat and plan 
what we eat, we will know our- 
selves physically and can change 
or improve our physical condition. 
There is also much truth in this. 
We know that armies have failed 
because of lack of proper food, 
and we know that some people 
are made ill by certain types of 
food, while others flourish on the 
same thing. It is well to know 
ourselves physically, to find our 
weak points, and to train our- 
selves to make them stronger. 
President Theodore Roosevelt was 
a weak boy, but by proper physi- 
cal training became tough and 
strong. One of our objects here in 
college is to know ourselves 
physically, to build ourselves 



physically, and to keep this as 
part of our philosophy of life. We 
should, however, also know our- 
selves mentally and spiritually. 
Our minds have wonderful possi- 
bilities. Sometimes we say we can 
not learn mathematics or Latin, 
or French. Or Ave say we are too 
old to learn a certain subject. 
Such an attitude is wrong. During 
this war, this attitude has proved 
to be wrong over and over again. 
Both young men and men in mid- 
dle life have been learning new 
languages and new processes, 
rapidly and accurately. The stu- 
dent in college should seize his 
opportunities to learn and to 
know himself; to know that he 
can succeed in any line of mental 
endeavor, if he tries and applies 
himself. Spiritually, we should 
know ourselves. Tendencies that 
are bad we should drop and those 
that are good we should cultivate. 
"The second philosophy — Con- 
trol Thyself — is also a very im- 
portant one. The Romans were 
great law givers. They wished to 
proceed in everything in an or- 
derly manner. They established 
one of the great codes of laws in 
the world. Of course the ancient 
Hebrews, in the Commandments 
handed down to us in the Old 
Testament, expressed the neces- 
sity of self-control. We train 
our children to control them- 
selves, to let others play with 
their toys, not to give vent to 
their sudden tempers, and so on 
up through life. It is sad to see 
the great number of divorces 
which are taking place in our 
country today. I believe that 
many of them come about through 
lack of self-control on the part 
(Continued on page 4) 



Drake's Talk Is Motivated by Carlyle 



Professor Harley D. Drake, as 
speaker at the Chapel Services 
Sunday, January 30, gave us a 
very interesting talk. His theme 
centered around Thomas Carlyle's 
"Sartor Resartu s-The Tailor 
Patched", or "The Philosophy of 
Clothes." 

Using a gift box as an example, 
Professor Drake emphasized on 
the audience that, while a gift 
may be enclosed in an elaborately 
decorated box, it is the gift it- 
self which is of value. It is like 
this with people. We may dress 
In the finest of materials or in 
the simplest attire, but the char- 
acter of the wearer is more im- 
portant. Clothes are essential, 
but do not exist for themselves 
alone. Therefore, we should not 
try to live to dress, but dress to 
live. We cast off old clothes, 
therefore other clothes must be 
cast off, but not until new and 
better ones are ready for us. 
Why, then, do we not do the 
same way with our ideas? Con- 
tinuing with his talk, Professor 



Drake stated that the correct life 
is essentially spiritual. We should 
strive for self-renunciation and 
not put self first. The way out 
of pessimism is through doing 
honest work, sticking to our duty 
each day, and remaining faithful 
to the right as we know it. No 
matter how small a task is, we 
should not neglect it and should 
strive to do our best. Work 
should be accomplished while pos- 
sible and not put off until it is 
too late. Concluding his lecture, 
Professor Drake unveiled the fol- 
lowing bit of philosophy, quoted 
from Carlyle, written on the 
blackboard; 

"Produce. Produce! Were it 
but the pitifullest infinitesimal 
fraction of a product, produce it 
in God's name! 'Tis the utmost 
thou hast in thee: out with it 
then. Up! Up! Whatsoever thy 
hand findeth to do, do it with 
thy whole might. Work while it 
is called Today; for the night 
cometh, wherein no man can 
work." 



E. M. Gallaudefs Birthday Honored 



Prof. Frederick Hughes opened 
his talk on Edward Miner Gal- 
laudet on the evening of Febru- 
ary 6, in Chapel Hall, with the 
explanation that we were fortu- 
nate in having the founder we 
do. He said some other colleges 
might be as fortunate but few 
could be more so. 

In his lecture he stressed the 
fact that Edward Miner Gallau- 
det was a very prominent figure 
here in Washington. He was the 
President of the National Con- 
vention of the Teachers of the 
Deaf besides being chairman of 
many important organizations and 
on the board of several more. In 
his ideals and in business his 
Huguenot and New England blood 
made him the success he was. 
However, he was greatly loved 
as an individual. He made the 
deaf feel that they were impor- 
tant as individuals regardless of 
their handicap. An illustration of 
how much they revered him is 



shown on the occasion of one of 
visits away from the College. As 
he was returning to Kendall 
Green in his horse and buggy, the 
students rushed up, and, unhar- 
nessing his horse, pulled him to 
the President's home themselves. 

He loved to tell jokes, even if 
they were on himself, and there 
was one in particular that he 
loved to tell. It happened at a 
social gathering when he came 
upon a Chinese friend whose 
name he had forgotten, but whom 
he wanted to introduce to a 
friend who was with him. Tact- 
fully suggesting that it was dif- 
ficult to remember Chinese names 
because of their difficult pronun- 
ciation, he asked that the Chinese 
friend introduce himself. Imagine 
the situation when the Chinese 
friend revealed himself to be 
"Mr. Pi"! 

In conclusion, Professor Hughes 
asked Marilyn Hughes, '4 6, to re- 
(Continued on page 4) 



Fusfeld Attends 
Mich. Conference 

Prof. I. S. Fusfeld Speaks 
On Higher Education 

Professor Irving S. Fusfeld of 
the Gallaudet College faculty at- 
tended the Midwinter Conference 
on the Deaf and the Hard of 
Hearing, held February 3, 4, and 
5, in Flint, Mich., in commemora- 
tion of the ninetieth anniversary 
of the founding of the Michigan 
School for the Deaf. Prof. Fus- 
feld was invited to take part in 
the program along with other 
noted educators of the deaf. 

The conference, which was held 
on the grounds of the Michigan 
School for the Deaf, was well at- 
tended. Representatives f r o m 
quite a number of states assem- 
bled there. Among the noted 
visitors were Supt. Truman L. 
Ingle of the Missouri School for 
the Deaf, Supt. Howard M. Quig- 
ley and Prin. William L. Fair 
of the Kansas State School for 
the Deaf, Pres. Spencer Phillips 
of the Louisiana State School for 
the Deaf, Dr. Gertrude Van Ades- 
tine, principal of the Detroit-Day 
School, and many others. The 
theme of the conference, "Living- 
Today for Tomorrow," was ably 
developed by a series of careful- 
ly-prepared papers, lively discus- 
sions, and excellent demonstra- 
tion sessions. Separate sessions 
covered these topics: methods of 
dealing with the slow-learning 
child, the hard of hearing and 
the deafened, home life and men- 
tal hygiene, hearing conservation, 
speech development, vocational 
adjustment, motivation, language 
development, the spastic child, 
reading for the deaf, and higher 

itiGfc. P; o£. Fu .' "u *> 
paper on the last-named topic. 

The highlight of the meeting 
was a banquet in the Service 
Building of the school, attended 
by many distinguished visitors. At 
the banquet, announcement was 
made by the state superintendent 
of public instruction of a new 
construction program for the 
school amounting to the sum of 
$1,011,100, which would soon be 
carried out. Another feature of 
the banquet was the presentation 
of a Scroll of Honor to Dr. Ger- 
trude Van Adestine, principal of 
the Detroit-Day School for the 
Deaf, and to Mr. James M. Ste- 
wart, formerly on the staff of the 
Michigan School over a very long 
period. Both awards were given 
in recognition of distinguished 
services as educators of the deaf. 
Mr. Stewart was graduated from 
Gallaudet College with a B.A. de- 
gree in 1893; with an M. A. de- 
gree in 1924. 

On Sunday, February 6, Prof. 
Fusfeld addressed the alumni as- 
sociation of the Michigan School 
on the life of the Rev. Barnabas 
Maynard Fay, the first principal 
of the school. The Reverend Fay 
was the father of Dr. Edward 
Allen Fay, who for so many years 
was a distinguished member of 
the Gallaudet College Faculty. 

Among the pleasant memories 
of the occasion for Mr. Fusfeld 
was the opportunity to meet 
many of the college graduates 
who live in or near Flint, quite 
a number of whom are on the 
teaching staff of the Michigan 
School. 

V 

Smithsonian Institution Gives 
College Mineral Collection 

Recently the college received a 
collection of twenty-five beautiful 
mineral specimens from the U.S. 
National Museum, a branch of the 
Smithsonian Institution. It came 
as a surprise, and was gratefully 
received. 

The minerals are a welcome 
addition to the incomplete col- 
lection in the Laboratory. Quite 
a few have been imported to the 
States, and all are excellent speci- 
mens. They are as follows: gar- 



Packed House at 
Senior Class Circus 

J Judging from the sound of out- 
j rageous laughter, booming can- 
nons, and cracking whips, one 
should have thought the Ring- 
ling Brothers, Barnum and Bai- 
ley Circus was somewhere in the 
vicinity of Kendall Green on the 
evening of February 5. However, 
such was not the case. All this 
clamor was only the walls of Old 
Jim resounding to the breath- 
taking acts of the Senior Class 
Circus. 

The show was given for the 
benefit of the Senior Class who 
has decided to publish a year 
book, but had discovered that it 
would be unable to finance the 
book on the small r e s o u r c es 
which they had. Therefore, the 
class devised ways and means to 
help meet expenses. The Senior 
Circus was a part of the plan. 

The clowns, overhanging ropes, 
center poles, flags, ring and side- 
show tent gave the interior of 
Old Jim the appearance of a real 
indoor circus. Aside from the 
side-splitting clowning of Lean- 
der Moore and Bertt Lependorf, 
the main acts afforded much en- 
tertainment and amusement for 
the audience. There were the 
Grand March, in which all mem- 
bers of the troupe participated, 
comprising a make-shift band 
with such "musical" instruments 
as tambourines, bells, drums, and 
cymbals; the Trained Bear on 
Skates, with Mary Sladek as the 
trainer and Leonard Meyer as the 
bear; an acrobatic and a magic- 
ian's act featuring L. Meyer as 
Professor Meyerofsky and Virgie 
Bourgeois as a hypnotized acro- 
bat; the Sharpshooter, with Julia 
Burs: a s the arr*»w.-shtf>oting 
squaw; the Hoss Skates, witn Car- 
lie Todd as the trainer and June 
King and Leonard Meyer as the 
"hoss"; the "World's Strongest 
Man," Thomas Berg, who lifted 
"two-ton" cracker boxes full of 
air at each end of a broom han- 
dle; Clyde Beatty and Her Train- 
ed Animals, with Mary Sladek as 
the trainer, and Clarice Petrick, 
Arlene Stecker, Caroline Tilling- 
hast, and Malvine Fischer as the 
tigers; the Mock Wedding of T. 
Berg, a six-foot bride and Fran- 
ces Lupo, a four-and-one-half foot 
groom, with Charles Pollock of- 
ficiating, and L. Moore as the 
pulpit; the Human Cannon Balls, 
the fearless J. Burg, F. Lupo, and 
M. Fischer; and the blood- 
thirsty Gargantua, enacted real- 
istically by L. Moore. Ring- 
master Baldridge peeled out 
honeyed spiels between each act. 
By popular consent, the acrobatic 
skill of graceful Miss Bourgeois, 
the amblings of the "trained" 
tigers, and the Herculic feats of 
"Strong Man" Berg were the 
main attractions of the show. 

Refreshments consisting of pop- 
corn, hot dogs, and pop were 
served. Following the program a 
dance and general get-together 
was enjoyed by all. The coopera- 
tion of the Senior class under the 
chairmanship of Bertt Lependorf 
was responsible for the success 
of the performance. The class 
wishes to thank Professor and 
Mrs. Frederick H. Hughes, who 
were chaperons for the evening. 

net, native copper, calcite, cas- 
siterite, galena, sphalerite, asbes- 
tos, pyrite, chalcopyrite, barite, 
spodumene, quartz (massive) , 
feldspar, selenite, magnetite, 
proustite, sulfur, bauxite, chal- 
cedony, biotite, limonite, phlogo- 
p i t e, pyrolusite w. magnatite, 
hematite, and tourmaline (black). 
It was upon the recommenda- 
tion of E. P. Henderson, Associ- 
ate Curator of Mineralogy and 
Petrology, that this gift was 
made. The college wishes to ex- 
tend their thanks to Mr. Hender- 
son and to the Smithsonian In- 
stitution for their kindness, and 
wishes to assure them that much 
use will be made of this new col- 
lection. 



Motion Pictures of Life at 
Gallaudet in Great Demand 



-® 



"Kismet" Presented 
By Movie Club 

With "Kismet," starring Otis 
Skinner, popular actor of silent 
film days, as the feature presen- 
tation, the Movie Club gave its 
scheduled presentation in Chapel 
Hall on the evening of February 
4. This feature, a mixture of 
adventure and romance in the 
Far East, depicted the queer 
twists of Fate in its dealings 
with people. Mr. Skinner portray- 
ed skilfully his role as Hajj, a 
beggar of the Orient who was 
given the opportunity to be his 
own master for a day. 

The first of the two comedies 
on the program, "His Wooden 
Wedding," concerned the antics 
of a groom, Charlie Chase, who 
was falsely informed that his 
bride-to-be had a wooden leg. The 
audience was kept in a constant 
uproar throughout the second 
comedy of Snub Pollard and his 
associates as they attempted to 
modernize their hotel. An in- 
novation in the movie programs 
to date was introduced, in the 
form of a newsreel depicting im- 
portant events in the world of 
the immediate past, and seemed 
to meet with immense approval 
among the audience. 

The next program is scheduled 
for the evening of March 11, 
and although plans for this pro- 
gram have not yet been complet- 
ed, President Meyer Plotitsky and 
his staff of assistants promise 
that the program win he ns en- 
joyable as the recent one. 
V 



O. W. L. S. Lit. Program 
Honors Presidents 

The month of February offers 
several appropriate themes for lit- 
erary purposes. The O.W.L.S. 
Literary meeting, held on the 
evening of February 4, was car- 
ried out with George Washington 
and Abraham Lincoln as the 
themes. 

Celia Burg, '45, presented 
"The Highest Pedestal" by Wil- 
liam Gladstone. W. Sullivan's 
account of the formality in which 
Washington lived was given by 
Jean Smith, '4 6, under the title, 
"President Washington's Recep- 
tions." A humorous poem, "The 
New George Washington," was 
signed by Marjorie Case, '46. 
Mary Sladek, '44, stressed the per- 
sonality of Lincoln in her talk, 
"Majestic in H i s Individuality," 
by J. P. Newman. "Lincoln 
Leads," a poem by Minna Irving, 
was gracefully and effectively de- 
livered by Virgie Bourgeois, '44. 
Gertrude Slattery, '46, and Earl- 
ine Becker, '47, gave an amusing- 
skit, "Mr. and Mrs." "The Star 
Spangled Banner" was the last 
on the program, signed by one of 
this year's favorite signers, Fran- 
ces Lupo, '44. Carlie Todd, '44, 
was critic. This was thought to 
have been one of the most thor- 
oughly fitting and pleasantly-bal- 
anced literary meetings yet seen, 
and Chairman Wilkins is to be 
complimented on her work. 
V 

Technical Error Disqualifies 
Painting for Entry in Exhibit 

Mention was made in the last 
issue of The Buff and Blue of a 
water color of the Gallaudet Col- 
lege Chapel by Mr. Felix J. Kow- 
alewski, '37. It was on exhibi- 
tion here prior to entry in the 
Forty-Eighth Annual Exhibition 
of the Washington Water Color 
Club at the Corcoran Art Gallery. 
This painting would have been 
accepted by the Club if not for a 
slight technical error in the pre- 
sentation of the painting. There 
were between 850 and 900 en- 



Prof. F. H- Hughes Is the 
Man Behind the Camera 

The moving picture committee 
of the Gallaudet College Alumni 
Association is now getting some- 
where, thanks to the fine camera 
outfit purchased by the Alumni 
Association for the use of the 
moving picture committee 
through the fund which it au- 
thorized David Peikoff, '29, to 
raise for that purpose. 

To date the following reels 
have been released for exhibi- 
tions: Colorful Scenes at Gal- 
laudet College; Talk by Dr. E. 
Peet and the Star Spangled 
Banner by Miss Susie Koehn; 
Talk by Miss Benson before she 
left Gallaudet to join the WACs; 
Classroom scenes at Gallaudet; 
and one of the clubmobiles, in 
action at a Washington, D. C, 
army show. This is one of the 
three clubmobiles presented to 
the Red Cross through the N. 
A. D. 

These films have recently beon 
shown at the following schools: 
West Virginia, Iowa, Nebraska, 
Texas, and Arizona. They a.e 
soon to appear at the Missouri 
school. C o m m ents from the 
schools after seeing the films 
have been encouraging. Aluuin 
wishing to use the films saoa. 
address Roy J. Stewart, l\jvo 
Park Road, N. W., Washington, 
D. C. 

Principal Kirkley, of the West 
Virginia School, says: "I be ie\e 
these films will do much to crea e 
enthusiasm among the pupils oi 
n u • • "-'n; ''« for nore (> n i^ ed 
education, namely, by attenuate 
at Gallaudet. The G. C. A. A. is 
to be congratulated for their in- 
terest and efforts in the promo- 
tion of education of the deaf" 

The Iowa Hawkeye says: 

"Excellent moving pictures 
taken at Gallaudet College we.e 
much enjoyed by pupils and fa 
culty members at the Iowa School 
the morning of December 8, at 
a Gallaudet Day program. These 
films were all "fresh as a daisy," 
having been made during 19 43 
and only recently released. They 
had a professional quality that 
brought out all details in a very 
lifelike way. 

"Colored reels carrying many 
striking scenes of the buildings 
and campus also included a mes- 
sage by Dr. Peet to the alumni, 
a rendition of the 'Star Spangled 
Banner' by Miss Koehn, a talk 
on a women's war service group 
by Miss Benson, comments by Dr. 
Hall on his seventieth birthday, 
and views of student activities. 
Black and white pictures showed 
more slants on student life, and 
also a view of the Clubmobile 
donated to the Red Cross by the 
deaf of America." 

Another classroom reel has 
just been completed and will be 
added to the collection mentioned 
above. It shows Professor Irving 
S. Fusfeld and Dr. Powrie Doc- 
tor with their classes. Other 
classroom reels are under way. 
The committee is greatly in- 
debted to the college authorities 
for making it possible to secure 
raw film for the work it is doing. 
The committee has also raised 
money for the purchase of film 
by holding local entertainments 
and selling old newspapers. The 
man behind the camera in all of 
these films was Professor F. H. 
Hughes, chairman of the com- 
mittee. 



tries in the exhibition, out of 
which only 89 paintings and 59 
drawings were accepted for dis- 
play. The president of the Club 
wrote Mr. Kowalewski a personal 
letter telling him how pleased 
they were with his painting, and 
wishing him better luck next 
year. 



I'A'JE TWO 



The Buff and Blue 



Friday. February 18, 1944 



The Buff and Blue 



Published once a month during October, De- 
cern oer, January, February and twice a month 
during November, March, April and May. Entered 
at the Post Office at Washington as second-class 
mail matter. 

Subscription Price $2.00 per year 

(Payable in advance) 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Malvine Fischer. '4 4 

LITERARY EDITOR Bertt Lependorf, '4 4 

NEWS EDITOR Byron Hunziker, '4fi 

SPORTS EDITOR . .__ Ljle A. Wiltse, '46 

ASS'T SPORTS ED Clarhelen Wilkins, '45 

ALUMNI EDITOR Winn. Id S. Runde, '01 

ASSOCIATES 

Robert Panara, '45 Earl Elkins, '46 

Christel Erdmann, '46 

REPORTERS and COLUMNISTS 

Caroline Tillinghast, "»4 Carlie Todd, '44 
John Randolph, '45 Calvin George, '45 

Betty-Jo Raines, '4ti Jean Smith, '46 

Ralph White, '4 6 Nadine Nichols, '4 6 

Earline Becker, '4 7 Thomas Fishier, '4 7 

Mervin Garretson, '47 

BUSINESS MANAGER Calv.n George, '4 5 

ASS'T BUSINESS MANAGER . Donald Padden, '45 
CIRCULATION MANAGER . Harold Steinman, '4 6 
ADVERTISING MANAGER . Charles Pollock, '44 

ASS'T ADV. MANAGERS . . Frank Sladek, '46 

Wayne Schlieff, P. C. 

PRINTERS 
Leonard J. Meyer, '44, FOREMAN 
William Brightwell, '4 6 Jason Amnions, '47 
Bertt Lependorf, '44 Wayne Furlong, '46 

Charles Pollock, '44 

PROOFREADER Eugene Schick, '47 



common to others' that we asked to be allowed to 
mix in the dining-room more often. Now that 
we have been granted this longed-for privilege, 
we should do all that i.s in our power not to 
abuse it. We can do this by always keeping in 
view the real purpose of this plan, viz: to offer 
the average student an opportunity to broadei 
his social contacts and to gain self-confidence 
at the table. 

I As We See It I 



mates: "I don't want to be wild or paint the 
town red, because thus an unpleasant memory of 
me would be left with my friends. It would be 
much better if I did what I usually do, and my 
friends would always recall that there was once 
an Estella May Wood."' 

Linette Freret is going to have a good time: 
"I haven't yet ridden on a real wild horse. No 
more need I worry about my life, so I shall ful- 
fill my long desire to ride. Dr. Alexander said 
that I could not swim, and Miss Peet added that 
perhaps I could never swim. But, whoopee, now 
I shall go swimming without worrying about any- 
thing! Why need I get white hairs from think- 
ing of my future? I am going to have the hap- 
piest seven days of my life right now." 



Jean Smith, '46 



1 G- 



liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiijii; 



MIXED SUPPERS 

Something new has been added to the daily 
routine of the Gallaudet student. For years 
the residents of College Hall and of Fowler Hall 
had always had their meals in separate refect- 
ories except once or twice a month when the 
young men and women could eat together in 
both dining-rooms' during the evening meal. For 
years the students had longed for the privilege 
to "mix" more often during meals. For some 
reason or other, their wish never materialized 
. . . that is, up to now. Perhaps it was owing 
to the lack of a large dining-room common to 
both Halls, as various members of the Faculty 
had so often suggested. Perhaps it was because 
of a lack of initiative on the part of the stucieni 
body. 

)This year, however, we decided to act. 
Through the Head Seniors we appealed to the 
Faculty to grant us the privilege of having 
"mixed suppers" several times a week. We got 
results. Now, on Monday to Thursday evenings 
we have mixed suppers. We were given to un- 
derstand, however, that this plan was on trial 
for the second term. If it proves feasible, this 
privilege may be incorporated into the daily 
life of the student. 

This new plan is already bearing fruit. The 
majority of the students seem to enjoy and to 
benefit from it. There is little social restrainl 
at the table, and everyone treats everyone else 
with courtesy and camaraderie. At the begin- 
ning, as was to be expected, several awkward 
situations arose, but they were overcome as soon 
as the strangeness and the newness wore out. 

As we understand it, the purpose of these 
"mixed suppers" is to promote the social status 
of the average student here, and to help him 
to form desirable habit patterns at the table. 
Several schools for the deaf in this country 
observe such a plan. The pupils from these 
schools, when they leave, can conduct themselves 
with dignity and self-confidence in public eat- 
ing-places. This is important because it adds 
greatly to making life more pleasant for them. 

We wish to thank the Faculty for their sym- 
pathy and cooperation in this matter. The suc- 
cess of any institution is dependent upon the 
ability of the administrative body to accept 
criticism, to improve any unsatisfactory condi- 
tions that may exist, and to treat all matters 
subjectively, as well as it is dependent upon 
cooperation on the part of the students. 

It was because of our natural desire to live 
as normally as possible and to enjoy privileges 



If the Freshmen had only a week in which to 
live. . .yes, only seven precious days In which to 
crowd a lifetime. . .some of them claim they 
would do the following things. . .at least, this is 
what they wrote in their Freshman English com- 
positions: 

So serious-minded is Ernest Schuster that not 
even the Shadow of Death can make him lose his 
sense of reality and straight thinking. He writes: 
"This paper is pure hypothesis. Actually no man 
is able to say what he would do were lie suddenly 
laced with the fact that he is nearing the end 
of the trail. The mere fact that a man knows 
death is waiting usually paralyzes a man's brain 
and makes him unable to use judgment in spend- 
ing his last days. I am not one or these people 
wlio think that they are able to do whatever they 
wish. Whether they want to sacrifice themselves 
to humanity, or carry on as usual, or drink up 
the last drops of life in a whirl of excitement, they 
usually do differently. Formerly, the opportunity 
was given to me to watch men who knew death 
was near. When their last days were going, go- 
ing, gone. . .cowards turned into heroes, and vice 
versa; few did what they meant to do." 

The drug store is the last stop before Paradise, 
according to many Frosh, including Barbara Myer, 
who is making it her haven for a whole day (okay, 
Doc?) and adds: "On Friday, I shall cut all my 
classes and break all the rules. Why should I 
worry about demerits when I can't take them with 
me when I die?" 

Ruby Miller sums up the hateful job of leaving 
good old Gallaudet: "Here I go. Gallaudet has 
been such a kind friend to me, nothing spacious 
and glorious, just homey, friendly, and good. This 
is the last time I shall walk on 8th Street and 
the last time I shall wait for the Glover Park bus. 
I see Union Station now and my train leaves in 
fifteen minutes. Hurry! Hurry! Hurry!" 

Typical of all who thought of going home was 
Earline Becker: "Prepare for the end? Ah yes, 
everything was different now. There was no more 
need to go on cramming my brain full of Latin 
verbs and ancient history. I was free. Free for 
what. . .what should I do with this last week of 
my mortal existence? Home? Yes, I must go 
home — back to those I loved, where the air is pure 
and fragrant and where unspoiled vistas of field 
and meadow draw one close to nature. To face 
the end here alone in this crowded and artificial 
city would be unbearable." 

Pollai Parsons' dramatic story proves that her 
heart belongs to Neptune: "Satisfied, I will be 
tempted to do something exciting and hazardous 
such as hobo on trains, hitch-hiking and last of all 
sailing in a small schooner. Finally, with my 
soul yearning for the open sea, I board the scho- 
oner with her sails unfurled and filled with wind, 
heading toward the glory of the sea. Soon storm 
and rough sea arise with the valiant little scho- 
oner battling against them. I help the sailors 
furl and unfurl the sails, some of which refuse to 
be tied down and are torn into shreds until I am 
all in. Then I go to my bunk, and drop off into 
a deep slumber that will go on forever and for- 
ever while the battered-down schooner begins to 
sink toward the bottom of the ocean." 

None of the Frosh wish their family to know 
of their fate. Writes Irene Quidas: "Upon reach- 
ing home, trying my best to control myself I may 
cheerfully say I came home for a one week vaca- 
tion. No suspicion would be aroused hence; I 
do not wish anyone to learn about my fate." 

Pat Mcintosh won't be changed a bit. "I shall 
cut all the classes that I'm not interested in — 
especially swimming, which should make college 
life more exciting for a while." 

In Heaven, they don't have drug stores, so 
Agnes Minor would stock up like a good little ant: 
"Mr. Johnson would have to give me all the money 
I had deposited in the office and with this I would 
buy all the ice cream, candy, and thick sand- 
wiches that I could, no matter if I nad to pay 
twenty dollars for the food. I would buy all the 
candy my boy friend would ask for and the ice 
cream he wanted, and at night take him to the 
best eating place in Washington. (Whoopee for 
Padden!) There we would talk about the good 
times that we had had". 

Quite unusual is Mary F. Miller's choice: "The 
last night I would explain everything in a long, 
long letter to my family and then pin it on my 
pillow. I would dress in my best clothes from 
head to foot and then, as usual, kiss my family 
good-bye before I go out. Without doubt, they 
would not notice any difference in my actions. A 
beautiful moon would beam brightly and it would 
be rather cold. I would walk and walk until I 
dropped on the ground." 

Estella Wood isn't going to have a fling at the 
best night club in town with some of her class- 



The Hurdy Gurdy 

Nadine Nichols, '46 & John Randolph, '45 




Did you know E. Wood 

simply loves fisn, especially 
Alms; there isn't any one in 
F. H. good enough for Schust- 
er, according to his philosophy; 
and that the rod in Stecker's 
clothes closet in forever falling 
down, and it isn't funny any 
more. 

Overheard in F. H. one 
§2 night just before "Lights-out": 

"Please make the door of 
Heaven wide, Dear God. . . .His gypsy feet would 
never find a narrow one." We understand this goes 
for all men in general. 

Is that bright light in Brightwell's eyes espe- 
cially for Riddy or is it the reflection from said 
damsel's own eyes? 

What is it that is very tiny, very biue, and that 
Minor now sports on her sweater? (P. S. It has 
D. P. on the back of it.) 

Jordan and James had a head-on collision in 
the hall;. . . Result: James was cool, calm, and 
collected, while Jordan received a cut on his fore- 
head and the ultimate decision that all Freshmen 
are just naturally thick-skulled. Representative, 
this James? 

It was a pleasing sight alright. Kleberg, we 
mean, surrounded by a flock of little boys. Further 
investigation produced the fact that he was super- 
vising the Kendall boys. The imagination, how- 
ever, was nice while it lasted. 

Of shoes and ships, and sealing wax ... By 
the way, Wiltse, are those meaningful glances you 
cast Todd's way supposed to be a military secret? 

Money is made to be spent 
or so it is said. When gone, 
more must be made so that 
more can be spent. Not a few 
gentlemen of College Hal] are 
slowly waking up to this 
fact. Proof of the matter is 
that work is once again attract- 
ing them . . . Big, husky 
Sladek is apparently underfed, 
if one takes his frequent visits 
to the A&W as any indication. 

However, it's known that a beautiful waitress 
serves him there. .. .Jean Smith has been rather 
quiet and doleful since her return to college from 
her Wisconsin visit. In case she doesn't know, there 
are males aplenty here, though. . . . Wistful 
Amnions — the fellow we see little of, speak little 
about, and hear less from — has been seen ever less 
lately. Wonder where he's keeping himself (Ed: 
In the print shop!) . . . .Newman has been or ap- 
pears to be directing his poetical inclination to- 
ward Fowler Hall. A word from the wise — women 
don't always fall for "poets" . . . Fred Drake, 
the little guy who's always around, speaking but 
rarely and then at only the right moment, repre- 
sents the utmost in loyalty to his girl back home 
. . . Rippe may be the college flop as a lover, 
but wow! how he can mooch! . . . Handcuffed 
love doesn't last, as Stanley learned to his sorrow 
. . . Baldridge came back from the hospital 
after an excessively long sojourn. Who was your 

Nurse, Baldy? The Wiltse-Todd combination 

seems to be weathering all difficulties with ease. 

1 Reader's Dri-Jest j 

Caroline Tillinghast, '44 




illlllll!l!llllli:i!lli:iil::i!l!!lll:llll!!lll!!llllllllllllllllllllll!lllllillll!if 

When Noah freed the ani- 
mals from his ark, he found 
two dejected snakes in a cor- 
ner. Noah asked them why 
they were so unhappy. 

"Well," said one of the 
snakes, "you told us to go 
forth and multiply upon the 
earth." 

"Yes," said Noah encourag- 
ingly. 

"But," cried the snake, 
'can't you see, we're only adders." 

AoA 

Ode To My Geometry Book 

If o'er the world there came a flood, 

To this book I would fly. 
Though all the world be covered with mud, 
This book would still be dry. 
AoA 
Professor Hughes: Mr. Ayers explain how a 




recession, a depression, and a panic differ. 
Ayers: Well, a recession is a period in which 
you have to tighten your belt, a depression is 
a time when you have no belt to tighten, but 
when you have no pants to hold up, it's a 
panic." 

ADA 
Waitress: I have stewed kidneys, boiled 

tongue, fried liver, and pig's feet. 
Customer: Don't tell me your troubles sister, 
give me a cheese sandwich. 
AOA 
Father, mother, and little Joey Kangaroo were 
hopping through an Australian field. As they 
bounced along, Junior kept popping out of Mama's 
pouch like a little jack-in-the-box and diving back 
again, delaying the progress of the tour. 

Father Kangaroo began to scold Joey when 
mother intervened. 

"Don't be hard on him," she pleaded. "It's 
really my fault- -I've got the hiccoughs." 

Campus Chatter 

; Betty-Jo Raines, '46 & Ralph White, '46 5 

. miHiiiiiiii 

Something new! Something 
lip different! The Seniors gave a 
Wfk circus and we all did indeed 
nl| enjoy it to the utmost. Ann 
9H Lee Sullivan and Mary Hughes 
WM McClure, two of our Campus 
|P3 Sweethearts, had a wonderful 
■H time, so it must have been a 
super circus. 

Who should pop up at the 

H Senior Circus but Miss Susie 

Koehn with her sister, Mrs. 

Ivan Curtis? It was a surprise but a nice one to 

see Susie around again. 

Mrs. Robert Hermann came to visit her daugh- 
ter, Roberta, the week-end of February 4th. Miss 
Hermann has been sick and her mother came to 
see how she has been getting along. 

Recently, the Kendall Greeners were surprised 
and pleased to hear of the marriages of two ex- 
students of the college. At 4.00 p. m. Friday, 
December 31, Miss Mildred Seymour and Mr. 
William Dickinson were married in the Pilgrim 
Lutheran Church in Kansas City, Mo. Miss Sey- 
mour is well known on the Green, being a former 
student of the class of '46, while Mr. Dickinson is a 
former student of the Kansas School for the Deaf. 

At 2.30 p. m. on the same 
day, Miss Betty Barger and 
Mr. Paul Barnes were married 
at a Baptist Church in Kansas 
City, Mo. Miss Jeanne Barnes, 
a sister of the groom, was 
bridesmaid, while Mr. Fred 
Rhynerson was best man. Miss 
Barger is also a former mem- 
ber of the class of '46. Mr. 
Barnes is a graduate of the 
Kansas School for the Deaf. 





! *i IP 




The Poet's Pack 

Contributions Made by the Student Body 



REACTION 
A word is said 
And thought presumes 
A feeling, then a sob, 
A sigh 
And then: 
"Oh, well, that's life." 

— Linette Freret, '4 7 



I HAD A PAL IN THE MARINES 
I had a pal in the Marines, 
A pal who was true as can be, 
He's sleeping tonight, among croses of white 
Row on row, by the sea. 
I had a pal in the Marines, 
A pal who was true as can be, 
'Tho he's gone, I'll carry on, 
'Til the last of our foes shall fall. 
I had a pal in the Marines, 
And we'll meet at the last roll-call. 

— Macolm Norwood, P. C. 



JUST ANOTHER CHEMISTRY "STUDENT" 

'Tain't any sense left in Chlorine and Copper 
No smell to that yellow stuff there, 
My test-tube has gone with its stopper 
And Bromine now disturbs other air. 

The evaporating dish and the crucible 
Have left for greener pastures. . .Hooray! 
That Bunsen, I'm telling you, was deucible; 
Potassium took a plane for Bombay. 

The oxygen that floats all about me... 
Was it made with that MnOs? 
Is the silver that's sold really antimony, 
Is that Arsenic or green peas in my stew? 

They say that Atlas is a man of iron muscles . . . 
Is it wrought-iron or pig-iron, or cast? 
Is gold the main cause of all tussles, 
Is zinconium the end 'cause it's last? 

'Twas the wind from the window that woke me, 
There was a smile of pure joy on my lips. 
I knew I had dreamed about Chemistry. . . 
What else could make my heart beat in skips! 

Nadine Nichols, '46 



Friday, February 18, 1944 



The Buff and Blue 



PAGE THKEK 



< iliiililllllilllilllllilllllllllllllllilllillii!ilillllillililiiiiiiiljiiiii i !iid]!i>.i.ii l 

i SPOUT SLAMTS 

E by Lyle Wiltse 



The recent affray with the Johns Hopkins University quint in the 
Roosevelt High School gym left the Blues feeling downright glum, 
with plenty of reason. Firstly, because Johns Hopkins had bowed in 
defeat to the "Thundering Herd' on their home court in Baltimore 
earlier in the season. Secondly, in view of their previous victory 
over this particular team, the Bisons had sort of begun to count 
their chicks before they were hatched. In plain English, they were 
over-confident of winning this game. Yours truly ambled about a 
bit prior to the event, and more than one chap was seen to mention 
something like this. "Boy, there should be some crowd on hand to 
see us streak through those babies like a hot knife through butter!" 
But somehow, the whole works backfired with chagrinous results, 
and the boys came home resembling wet towels with little ability 
at oral calisthenics in tow, aside from the usual lingo known to all 
tongues when things have taken a turn for the worst. Despite all 
this, one thing can be said in favor of the game, which is, practically 
the whole of the District of Columbia showed up as had been anti- 
cipated, and the Athletic Association is financially that much better 
off for it. 

The opening date of the Mason-Dixon Conference in Baltimore is 
drawing nearer, and the super-pessimists are beginning to really 
despair at the record of the team to date. The boys have fought 
valiantly, but nearly always off Key. It is time they developed some 
new strategy and added a bit of accuracy to those basket tosses. As 
it stands, it's going to be a right rousing battle for the Blues to 
retain the crown! You'll want to be in Baltimore for the finals, 
March 4. 

With the not to-distant approach of spring we may turn our 
thoughts gradually toward the forthcoming track and field season 
when our young Herculeses, Sampsons, and Mercuries will be out 
on Hotchkiss Field and elsewhere doing their stuff for dear old Gal- 
laudet. The Blues have already commenced to train in part for the 
inaugural meet. Our opponents such as Catholic University and 
others have been doing the same since as far back as January 5. 
Despite their late start, the Blues still have a grand chance to catch 
up and offer some rigid competition. However, full-scale practice 
will have to wait until the basketball season is at an end, since many 
of our tracksters are on the varsity squad and have no time what- 
soever at their disposal for tracR and field practice. The weather 
has been ideal for outdoor workouts lately, and a number of the 
boys are to be seen nearly every afternoon on the campus carrying 
on the javelin throw and the discus throw. The runners are keeping 
pretty well in tune through the exertion offered on the basketball 
court. Those who participated in the cross country meets last fall 
will take but a brief period to condition themselves. We lost, through 
graduation last spring, four ol our veterans, namely, Francis Huff- 
man, John Galvan, Arnold Daulton, and Earl Roberts, whom we 
could surely use to advantage now, but there are a number of pro- 
mising prospects who are itching for a trial. Summing up things 
briefly, prospects in the various divisons are quite good, with the 
exception of the dashes and the pole vault. Thomas Berg, '44, was 
elected to captain the entire squad. Carry on in good faith, gents! 
We'll all be there behind you with three long cheers for Gallaudet, 
and then some! 



Compliments 
Glass of '47 



jiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiEi'itrr^ 

LITTLE | 

9th St., South of G 

Hearing aids for most seats! E 

First Run & Revivals =} 
See Daily Papers for Programs = 



The Heart has many reasons 
that Reason never knows. 



Quality 



186H 



ART MUTH 

MATERIALS «. hm 



Mrs. Geo. L. Sutton 

Mrs. L. Sutton Bailey 

ATlantic 115 3 

PEOPLES 

FLOWER SHOP 

"Say It With Flowers" 

SOU II Street, N. E. 



CASSON STUDIO 



Photographers of the 1943 Buff and Blue 



1305 Conn. Avenue. N. W. 



DEcatur 1333 



t]lllllil!lll!:3IIIIIIIIIIIIC3llllllllllllE3llll!lli:ilir3IIIIIIIIIIIIC2IIIIIIIIIIIIE3!UIIII!!:' 



*!!l!!ll|lllllllllllll!lll!lllll 
GALLAUDET 



II' • 



PHARMAGYI 



s Phone Atlantic 

| 1000 Flordia Ave., N. E. - Washington, D. C. 
iTtiiiiiiiiiicaiiiiiiiiiiiicaiiitiiEiiiiicaiiiiiiitiiiicaiiiiitiiiiiic3iiiiiiiiiiiiC3iiiiiiiiiiiicii:iiiiii3iii^7 j 



Mie Bisons Lose 
out to J. EU. 

Gallaudet's Blue Bisons surrer- 
ed their greatest setback of the 
year when the previously con- 
quered Johns Hopkins University 
quintet spelled defeat for them 
at the Roosevelt High School 
court on January 28. Neither 
team was in good form, nor did 
either display the ball-handling 
usually credited to teams of such 
rank. In fact, they took chance 
shots, striking tediously at the 
loop in a vain effort to chalk up 
the leading score, but their re- 
lentless efforts tallied up very 
few expert scoring factors. 

Although Gallaudet's Guardian 
Angel seemed to have abandoned 
ship that night, still, the team 
found their chord time and time 
again but failed to continue the 
fine team work simply because 
they struck a high note. Johns 
Hopkins ran completely over the 
Bisons in the first quarter, al- 
lowing them only two points to 
their fourteen. During the sec- 
ond quarter the score teetered 
slightly in our favor, but we 
could not as yet overcome the 
great first quarter advantage the 
opponents had on us. The third 
quarter ended with Johns Hop- 
kins ahead by a sixteen-point 
margin. 

In the last and final stanza of 
the sad song we find Gallaudet 
singing gustily on the floor, try- 
ing hard to overcome their cha- 
grin by driving a hard offensive 
right into the middle and into the 
basket. They played their finest 
during this quarter, earning fif- 
teen points to their opponents' 
eight, and it is really regrettable 
that we had to postpone such 
power and coordination until this 
precarious period. The final score 
stood 39-30. 
Summary: 

Gallaudet FG FT Pts 

Holcomb 113 

Baldridge 5 10 

Mortensen 11 

Schleiff 

Witczak 2 2 6 

Leitson 

Padden 4 8 

Fishier 10 2 

Massey 

Total 13 4 30 
Johns Hopkins . FG FT. .Pts 

Hazel 3 6 

Craine 

Rudo 4 19 

Goldberg 

Cooper 3 2 8 

Wiley 10 2 

Isaacs 2 4 

Bonura 11 

Roercherding 3 17 

Loreck 10 2 



Total 



17 



5 39 



THOMPSON'S 
| I1ARBER SHOP 

i Orleans Place near Fla. Ave. 
S Hair Cut As You Like It 

50 cents 
Hours: 11 to 8 
) 9 to 9 Saturdays 



Jack's Meat Market 

922 7th St., N. E. 

Fancy Groceries, Fruit And 

Vegetables 

Beer and Wine 

J. Greenstein, Prop. 



Lite Saving Uass 
well Under vVay 

A class in life-saving was be- 
gun recently under the instruc- 
tion of Mrs. Kenneth Temple with 
the assistance of Julia Burg and 
Frances Lupo, both of the Senior 
class. Nine girls are enrolled in 
the course. They are Roberta 
Herrmann and Clarice Petrick, 
Seniors; Clarhelen Wilkins, Juni- 
or; Agnes Minor, Hester Par- 
sons, and Norma Bushey, Fresh- 
men; and Ruth Depew, Frances 
Parsons, and Betty Taylor, Preps. 
The class meets four times a 
week in the girls' swimming pool. 
The course is expected to extend 
over a period of about six weeks. 

The object of the course is to 
teach the girls the safety rules of 
swimming for themselves and 
others, and to teach them the var- 
ious methods of rescuing a drown- 
ing person. At present, the girls 
are working on the elementary 
forms of rescue and will gradu- 
ally, as they build up endurance 
and skill proceed to the more dif- 
ficult forms. 

Although the girls may never 
be life guards, life-saving know- 
ledge is a good thing for anyone 
to have. If any of these girls 
ever could meet an emergency 
in the water, they will not lose 
their heads, but will be able to 
save their own lives as well as 
those of others. The course being 
given is a regular American Red 
Cross Life Saving course. Certifi- 
cates will be given to those who 
shall have succeeded in passing 
the requirements set by this 
course. 

Hying Tigresses 
Are Victorious 

The intramural volleyball tour- 
nament begun during the last 
part of the first term was com- 
pleted recently with the Flying 
Tigeresses winning the champion- 
ship. All games were played with 
great spirit, although in some 
games the teams were unevenly 
matched. The last two games, 
one played between the Flying 
Tigresses and the Little Lulus 
and the other between the Flying 
i Tigresses and Hell-Cats, were 
very good games. The teams were 
about evenly matched and, since 
it was so near the end of the 
tournament, the girls were all 
out to win. The Tigresses played 
a fine game and deserve the 
championship which they have 
won. 

The places of the other teams 
are: second, Little Lulus; third, 
Hell-Cats; fourth, Cheetas; fifth, 
Coinmandolls; sixth, Banshees; 
and seventh, .lumping Beans. 

The members of the various 
teams are as follows: 

Flying Tigresses — J. Burg, 
Capt.; Bourgeois, Fischer, King, 
Lupo, Petrick, Herrmann, Sladek. 
Little Lulu s — Todd, Capt. ; 
Stecker, Tillinghast, C. Burg, 
Carr, Faux, Stark, Wilkins; 
Hell-Cats — Raines, Capt.; Barnes, 
Case, Clack, Erdmann, Hughes, 
Nicholas, Smith; Cheetas — Wood, 
Capt.; Myer, H. Parsons, Quidas, 
Ridpath, Bushey, Chapin, Depew; 
Conunandolls — Minor, Captain; 
Slattery, Becker, Cuscaden, Fre- 
ret, Mcintosh, M. F. Miller, R. 
Miller; Bansheees — Taylor, Capt.; 
Lucas, F. Parsons, Ross, Stakley, 



SHOP NEAR BY 



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Men's and Boys' Wear 



Dress and Sports Wear 



Work Clothing 



925 H Street, N. E. 



Phone TRindad 8833 



Stiffler, Watson, Wharton, Yo- 
well; Jumping Beans — Huett, 
Capt.; Halvorson, Hamlin, Hatch, 
Hatten, Hughart, Intermill, Kres- 
sin. 

A new set of teams has been 
arranged and another tournament 
will begin immediately. The 
new teams are more evenly 
matched, so that the handicap of 
lack of practice on the part of 
the Preps will be made up for by 
others on the teams. All teams 
showed great improvement during 
the tournament, especially the 
Prep teams, and it is hoped that 
the girls will keep up their in- 
terest and improve even more 
during the new tournament. It 
is expected that the new series 
of games will continue through 
the term until it is warm enough 
to begin outdoor sports again. 
V 

Blue Bisons Lose, 
57-27, to C. U. 

Gallaudet's Blue Bisons fell 
victims for a second time to Coach 
Johnny Long's Catholic University 
quintet Monday night, January 
10, on the Cardinals' home floor. 
The last whistle found the Catho- 
lic Universiy basketeers out in 
front, 57-2 7. 

With Captain Paul Baldridge 
hospitalized due to an infection 
of the right leg, and with Don 
Padden on the sidelines during a 
great part of the first half, the 
Blues never had a chance to come 
within fifteen points of the vic- 
tor. 

The Cardinals were off to a 8-0 
start before the Bisons found the 
range. In the waning seconds of 
the second stanza, Gallaudet 
staged a brief rally that found 
Catholic University still leading 
22-9. 

During the second half, the 
Cardinals' defense was so tight 
that the Blues were forced to 
shoot from all angles of the floor. 

Mercak and Scanlon were high- 
point men for the Cardinals with 
sixteen and twenty-three points 
respectively. Outstanding men 
for the Blues were Holcomb and 
Padden. Holcomb had fifteen 
markers to 'his credit. 
GALLAUDET FG FT TP 

Holcomb 6 3 15 

Mortensen 10 2 

Stanley 113 

Witczak 10 2 

Padden 2 15 

Massey 

Fishier 

Amnions 

Total 11 5 27 

Catholic University FG FT TP 
Mercak 7 2 16 

Kingsbury 10 2 

Szklarz 3 6 

Scanlon 10 3 2 3 

Rice 

Carlin 2 4 

Prichard 3 6 

Totals 2 6 5 57 



Organization Directory 

Associated Student 

Financial Department 

Pres Leonard Meyer, '44 

Vice-Pres Willis Ayers, '45 

Secy. . . . Donald Wilkinson, '45 

Treas Henry Krostoski, '45 

Asst. Treas. . . Frank Sladek, '46 

Dramatic Club 

Pres Paul Baldridge, '44 

Vice-Pres. . . Leander Moore, '44 

Secy Mervin Garretson, '47 

Treas Ralph White, '46 

Gallaudet College 

Athletic Association 

Pres Charles Pollock, '44 

1st V.-P. . . . Donald Padden, '45 

2nd V.-P. . Henry Krostoski, '45 

3rd V.-P. . Herman Johnson, '4 6 

Secy Earl Elkins, '4 6 

Treas. . . . Marvin Marshall, '4 7 

Asst. Treas. . . . Lyle Wiltse, '4 6 

Gallaudet College Women's 

Athletic Association 

Pres Julia Burg, '44 

Vice-Pres Celia Burg, '45 

Secy. Betty Jo Raines, '4 6 

Treas Earline Becker, '47 

Kappa Gamma Fraternity 

Grand Rajah. Bro. Baldridge, '44 

Kamoos Bro. Padden, '45 

Tahdheed Bro. Meyer, '44 

Mukhtar .... Bro. Krostoski, 45 

Literary Society 

Pres Ralph White, '4 6 

V.-Pres. . Warren Blackwell, '46 

Secy Mervin Garretson, '4 7 

Treas Marvin Marshall, '47 

Movie Club 

Pres Meyer Plotitsky, '44 

Vice-Pres. . Harold Steinman, '4 6 

Secy Byron Hunziker, '46 

Treas Marvin Marshall, '47 

O. VV. L. S. 

Pres. . . Caroline Tillinghast, '4 4 

Vice-Pres Agnes Carr, '4 5 

Secy Jean Smith, '4 6 

Treas Marjorie Case, '46 

Librarian . . . Frances Lupo, '44 

Photography Club 

Pres Bertt Lependorf, '44 

Secy-Treas. . Leonard Meyer, '44 
General Mgr. . W. Blackwell, 4 6 

Men's Reading Room Committee 

Chairman . Meyer Plotitsky, '44 

Secy.-Treas. . Jack Hensley, '45 

Thomas Berg, '44 

Willis Ayers, '45 

James Drake, '4 6 

Cecil Alms, '46 

Young Men's Social Club 

Pres Ralph White, '46 

Vice-Pres. . Marvin Marshall, '47 

Secy Mervin Garretson, '47 

Treas Thomas Fishier, '47 

Young Women's Christian Assn 

Pres Frances Lupo, '44 

V.-P. . . . Clarhelen Wilkins, '45 

Secy Nadine Nichols, '46 

Treas Aleatha Barnes, '46 

Lit. Chmn. . . Arlene Stecker, '44 
Asst. Chmn. . . Betty Stark, '45 



FAMOUS CLOSE SHAVES By Barber Sol 



V ^P^f cv ^^^W.ASeXPlA!N!NGTO FRiENDS, UNSUC- 
CESSFUL ATTEMPiS TO VULCANIZE RU33ER. ACCIDENTALLY A FRIEND^ 
PROPPED SOME RUBBER ON THE STOVE. GOODYEAR EXAMIN NG 
to THE RUBBER GASPED, »TME RuBBEP IS VULCANIZED"' 





NAZI MEAHS-SPILLS BEANS.., 

AN ESCAPED NA1! PRISONER WAS AP- 
PREHENDED IN LITTLE ROCK, ARK, WHEN 
A FARMER FROM, WHOM HE WANTED To 
3UY MILK, THOUGHT IT STRANGE THAT HE 
DIDN'T ASK FOR IT By MEASURE, BUT 
DEMONSTRATED THE AMOUNT HE 
WANTED WITH HIS HANDS. 



RAINFALL SAVES ALL 

CAPT. CHIP KLEPPNER'S MER- 
CHANT SHIP WAS SET AFIRE BY 
A NAZI RAIPER. THE UNCON- 
TROLABLE BLAZE INDUCED THE 
ORDER TO ABANDON SHIP. AT 
THAT MOMENT, A FORTUITOUS 
RAINSTORM EXTINGUISHED 
THE FIRE AMD SAVED THE 
VESSEL. 





3AJ&ER SOL SAYS'. 

"CORR" HITLER NEVER KNEW 
HE LACKED THE "GENERAL'S" VIEW 
BUV U.S. WAR BONDS 



PAGE POUK 



The Buff and Blue 



Friday, February 18, 1944 



NEWS OF THE ALUMNI 



!iy \V infield S. Runde, '01 



New Year's Eve Louis Burns 
and wife held open house to their 
friends in Devils Lake. Among the 
guests present were: Wendell 
Haley, '20, and wife, Leslie Hin- 
nant, '35, and wife (Leona Otto- 
way, '06), Anton Axtman, an ex, 
and wife, and Nicholas Braunagel, 
'27, and wife. 

V 

The Rev. Henry J. Pulver, '17, 
offers the following beautiful 
prayer for all the deaf: 

"Help us O Lord, Our God this 
year and every year, 'to lift up 
our hearts,' remembering that the 
Morning Cometh. So shall we 
trust that thou wilt lead us out 
of this heavy darkness that now 
covers the Earth. And after the 
tumult of battle is past, may we 
enter into the day." 

V 

Hazel Davis, daughter of R. L. 
Davis, '09, teacher in the Texas 
School, is holding down a job as 
puncher in the Richmond, Cal. 
shipyards. She and Rosie Fong, 
'39, work in the same shift and 
they are always seen together 
when off duty. 

Ben W. Schowe, Jr., '42, has 
the third year pupils in the Ohio 
School. Last year he taught in 
the Virginia School. He and his 
bride (Laura Knight, '42), find 
housekeeping in their new sur- 
roundings quite an adventure. 
Laura, you know, was Librarian 
at the College last year. And, 
having lived with books, the love 
for them and their rich lore fills 
her with dreams of some day ac- 
cumulating a library in her own 
sweet abode where she and Ben 
can sit beside the open fire place, 
buried in a book, the mind mean- 
while wandering off to far and 
fascinating reaims. Such is youth's 
sweet dream! 

V 

James Theodore Flood, '28, and 
wife (Katherine Buster), have 
a "real swell apartment" near the 
Columbus School. The furniture 
is all solid mahogany of pre-war 
vintage. The pride of the House 
of Flood, however, is Kate's well 
stocked larder. Yum! Yum! How 
temptingly the array of jars and 
bottles of jams and what not look 
down from the bulging shelves. 
And those containers — why they 
are almost human and they al- 
most speak with a merry "have 
some." There are fat ones and 
lean ones and each one seems to 
posses an individuality that hark- 
ens you back to your childhood 
days when you were absorbed in 
the lovely tales of Hans Chris- 
tian Anderson! 

V 

Robert M. Greenmun, '36, and 
wife (Rosalind Redfearn, '41), 
do a lot of entertaining at their 
air conditioned apartment in Co- 
lumbus, Ohio. Their exquisite 
silverware, called "Candlelight," 
and Haviland China, appropriate- 
ly named "Rosalind", and Dolly 
Madison glassware, ah, what a 
sight for the guests seated around 
a table, draped in spotless white 
linen, loaded to the guards with 
tempting viands and culinary 
creations of the lovely hostess! 
And Bob orating on the Federal 
income tax and the point value 
of a leg of mutton! Wish we 
were under that blessed roof! 
V- 

H. Lakosky, ex-'43, is working 
in a defense plant at Flint, Mich. 
Formerly the company manufac- 
tured spark plugs. Our friend is 
rightfully proud of his record for 
precision work in the tool dept. 
He has seniority rating which 
means that in the course of time 
he will be upped — in job and 
pocketbook contents. 

-V 

Felix Kowalewski, '37, is teach- 
ing mechanical drawing in the 
Michigan School. The youngsters 
come to him from the monotony 
of classroom work with a happy 
smile. Felix is an understanding 



Compliments 
of t\e 

Curb Cafe 

714 H. St., N. E. 



artist whose personality diffuses 
the happy spirit of welcome, 
which the children unconsciously 
sense. 

V 

From teaching wood work to 
expanding the beauties of the 
English language, and the means 
of understanding the same thru 
constant reading — that was the 
score recorded recently at the 
Michigan School by Earl Jones, 
'40. He is said to be a corking 
good, promising young peda- 
gogue. 

Augusta K. Barrett, a former 
co-ed of the dim past, has laid 
aside her pen and no longer will 
report the activities of the deaf 
people of Los Angeles for the 
New York Journal of the Deaf. 
Her many friends regret her de- 
cision for she has shown herself 
to be an able reporter and wield- 
er of the pen. She and her good 
husband, John, who also attend- 
ed Gallaudet, are pleasantly lo- 
cated in a cozy home in the "City 
of the Angels." 

V 

Charles W. Haig, ex-'OO, for- 
merly of St. Louis, is now living 
at the home of his daughter in 
Louisville, Ky. Though three score 
and ten Charles is nearly as ac- 
tive and elusive as he was when 
he carried the football on Garlic 
Field. Spectators at games always 
looked for sensational plays by 
that dynamic little fellow with 
the thick crop of jet black hair! 
V 

In reporting the names of 
alumni who are clergymen of the 
Episcopal Church the name of 
Robert C. Fletcher, '2 6, was omit- 
ted. It was purely an oversight. 
Robert has been doing swell work 
in and around Birmingham, Ala., 
for many years. Besides his 
church work he is a member of 
the Board of Directors of the Na- 
tional Association of the Deaf. 
V 

Alvin Brother, 38, is the new 
President of the District of Col- 
umbia branch of the Gallaudet 
College Alumni Association. The 
appointment speaks well for the 
progress of the branch because 
Alvin always has been a stickler 
for organization and detail work. 
He showed much initative and en- 
thusiasm when he was the sole 
officially uniformed guide for 
visiting deaf people at the late 
Golden Gate International Ex- 
position, San Francisco. 

— — V ■ — 

The Rev. Otto B. Berg, '38, is 
a deacon in the Episcopal Church. 
He expects in time to be advanced 
to the priesthood. Alan B. Cram- 
mate, '32, is a layman in the Di- 
strict of Columbia. He assists the 
Rev. Mr. Berg. Of Mr. Berg, we 
are told that "he is a sincere and 
charming young man who is 
obviously putting his whole heart 
in his work." 

V 

The Rev. Mr. William M. 
Lange, '32, is described as being 
"an attractive, young priest who 
is replacing the retired Rev. Dr. 
H. C. Merrill, '96, and who is 
beloved by all and that we think 
ourselves fortunate in having the 
services of these two (the Rev. 
Mr. Berg and the Rev. Mr. 
Lange) sincere and manly young 
men who are plainly called to 
their work by spiritual forces." 

Reuben R. Heron, ex-' 9 6, has 
a successful jewelry business in 
Lakeland, Fla. He began on a 
small scale and gradually ex- 
panded. Now he is comfortably 
fixed. 

V 

There are quite a few Alumni 
living in and around Miami. One 
of them is Max Kestner, '97, the 
matchless Thespian of the famous 
Saturday Night Dramatic Club, 
thriller of packed Chaj-el Hall. 



NORTHEAST 
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Photo-Work 
651 H St., N. B. 



Remember him as he strutted on 
the stage to do his stuff one eve- 
ning and just then the great and 
only Douglas Craig, M. M., for- 
got to hold the ropes controlling 
the heavy curtain and . . . Maybe 
Max can refresh your hazy mem- 
ory, but maybe also he would 
rather forget the musty incident! 
_ — V 

February is the month when 
all good Americans think of the 
Father of His Country. Poems 
have been written in honor of 
great Americans who were born 
in this month. All are tributes 
of gratitude, poured from the 
soul. 

Alumni will be especially in- 
terested in reading, at this time, 
the noble ode written for Wash- 
ington's birthday February 12, 
187 8, by the bard of Cedarmere, 
William Cullen Bryant. It is an 
ode beautiful in its majestic 
sweep — which lifts the soul to 
sublime adoration of the soldier 
and statesman. It makes one 
feel that the great deeds of 
Washington in behalf of the 
inherent rights of man place his 
name high — a symbol for the 
ages. 

"Pale is the February sky, 

And brief the mid-day's sunny 
hours; 
The wind-swept forest seems to 
sigh 

For the sweet time of leaves 
and flowers. 

Yet even when the s u m m e r 
broods 

O'er meadows in their fresh 
array, 
Or autumn tints her glowing 
woods, 

No month can boast a prouder 
day. 

For this chill season now again 
Brings, in its annual round, 
the morn 
When, greatest of the sons of 
men, 

Our glorious Washington was 
born. 

Lo, where, beneath an icy shield 
Calmly the mighty Hudson 
flows, 
By snow-clad fell and frozen 
field 
Broadening the lordly river 
goes. 

The wildest storm that sweeps 
through space, 
And rends the oak with sud- 
den force, 
Can raise no ripple on his face 
Or slacken his majestic course. 

Thus, mid the wreck of thrones, 

shall live 
Unmarred, undimmed, our hero's 

fame, 
And years succeeding years shall 
give 

Increase of honors to his 
name." 
V — 

Henry S. Morris, '11, and wife 
(Ellen Johnson, '09) find the 
"warm sunny sun" of Miami posi- 
tively more inviting than they 
did the winter zero — and below 
— weather of Devils Lake where 
Henry used to teach the art pre- 
servative of all arts. 

V 

Lenore W. Bible, ex-'2 3, is a 
very patriotic person. She has 
donated blood to the Red Cross 
Blood Bank seven times. She is 
one of the hundreds of workers 
employed at the Douglas Aircraft 
Company near Los Angeles. 
Lenore is very handy with tools. 
In fact she is so versatile that she 
would be a credit to a skilled 
builder. Bully for you, Lenore! 

From the Minnesota Compan- 



ion we glean the following: 

"Friends of Superintendent Ed- 
win G. Peterson, of the Montana 
School for the Deaf, will be sorry 
to know that he has been forced 
to take a six-month leave of ab- 
sence to regain his health. Last 
summer Mr. Peterson and his two 
sons were driving when an unin- 
vited wasp entered the car, caus- 
ing Ed to lose control. Mr. Peter- 
son was seriously injured in the 
accident and lost considerable 
blood before medical attention be- 
came available. Donald R. Bosley, 
editor of the local newspaper, 
has been appointed assistant su- 
perintendent to relieve Mr. Peter- 
son while he recuperates at his 
nearby home. Superintendent 
Peterson is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. P. N. Peterson, of Faribault, 
grew up across the street from 
the M. S. D. campus, hence our 
interest in him. We hope for an 
early and complete recovery." 

V 

Ivan Curtis, '33, was recently 
hailed as top man in the mem- 
bership campaign promoted by 
the ever growing and influential 
National Fraternal Society of the 
Deaf. He was such a good sales- 
man that, when the contest 
closed, he had 8 5 new members 
to his credit Ivan formerly 
taught school in Oregon and S. 
D. Now he is in Washington, D. C. 
engaged in war work. We under- 
stand that Ivan made good in the 
classroom, and it is too bad that 
he left the profession. When an 
efficient deaf teacher, as weii a« 
an efficient hearing teacher, 
closes his classroom door for 
good, it is little short of a calam- 
ity to the deaf children. It seems 
that only adequate compensation 
and congenial surroundings can 
induce desirable leaders to make 
the sacrifice. 

William C. Ritter, Hon. '30, is 
enjoying retirement at Newport 
News, Va. He founded and was 
head of the Virginia School for 
the Colored Deaf and the Blind. 
His daughter by his second wife 
is married to an army officer. 

Lera C. Moore, '29, married to 

a non-college man who is a print- 

1 er, lives in Richmond. She has 

two fine children and a nice home 

_ v 

The^Rev. Dr. H. C. Merrill, '96, 
recently called at the St. Augus- 
tine, Florida School and? was wel- 
comed by C. J. Settles, N-'14. At 
the school- are several -graduates 
of the college Alfrfcfl F. OaUgiurl, 
'37 John J. Blindt, '40; William 
H. Grow, '27 and wife; Eugene 
Hogle, '13; Lalla Wilson, '24 and 
Edmund F. Baupmann, '02. An 
informal reception was held in 
honor of the Merrills at the school. 
V 

The members of the Board of 
Directors of the Gallaudet Co 1 - 
lege Alumni Asociation are as fol- 
lows: President, Rev. Herbert C. 
Merrill, '9 6, 322 Ninth Ave., 
North, St. Petersburg, Fla.; First 
Vice President, Ben M. Schowe, 
St., '18, 478 Madison Ave., Akron, 
Ohio; Second Vice President, 
David Peikoff, '29, 923 Avenue 
Road, Toronto, Ontario; Secretary 
Rev. Henry J. Pulver, '17, 3226 
North 16th St., Philadelphia, 
Penn.; Treasurer, Charles D. Sea- 



ton, '9 3, School for the Deaf, 
Romney, W. Va. 

V 

On Christmas Day Nicholas 
Braunagel, '2 7, and wife enter- 
tained at a sumptuous turkey and 
venison dinner — Supt. Arthur P. 
Buchanan, Hon. -'29, and wife, 
Thomas Sheridan, '94, and wife, 
and Wendell Haley, '20, and wife 
and daughter. Nick with a friend 
went hunting and bagged two 
deer. The children at the school 
(North Dakota) were not for- 
gotten and most of them feasted 
on their first morsel of delicious 
vension. It seems that to keep 
from freezing up there the Gal- 
laudet folks keep jumping around 
and making things lively. They 
get up parties of all sorts and 
even have outings at friend 
Haley's cottage on recedin g 
Devil's Lake. Olga Anderson,' 12, 
entertained her friends at one of 
the town's swank cafes. After the 
dinner gin rummy was played. 
Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet's 15 6 
natal day was appropriately cele- 
brated with a banquet at Mit- 
chell's Cafe. The Banner says: 

"The toastmaster of the eve- 
ning was Oilman Nordhougen, 
ex-' 10 of Fargo. Those who gave 
brief acounts on the life and the 
faithful work of Dr. Gallaudet 
were: Miss Olga Anderson, '12, 
Miss Rose Coriale, '40, Thomas 
Sheridan, '94, Ernest Langen- 
berg, '24, Nicholas Braunagel, '27, 
Supt. A. P. Buchanan, Hon. -'29, 
Leslie, Hinnant, '35, of Cando 
Mrs. Dwight Rafferty, ex-'46, Mrs. 
Thomas Sheridan and Mrs. Nich- 
olas Braungel. 

Arrangements for the affair 
were in charge of Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas Sheridan. — Devils Lake 
Journal 



on the world the need for kind- 
ness, pity, help, and love given 
by one person to another. Here 
in the quiet of Gallaudet College, 
perhaps we do not realize fully 
the terrible destruction, hatred, 
and vindictiveness that is spread- 
ing 1 abroad. People are not 
only being shot down in warfare, 
but, also, are being murderd in 
cold blood, their goods confiscat- 
ed, their homes blown to pieces, 
and many are starving slowly, but 
surely. When the awful time of 
war is over, there will be the 
greatest possible need of the phi- 
1 o s o p h y Give Thyself. You 
have taken part in the drives for 
the Red Cross and the Commun- 
ity War Fund, but you will be 
called upon many more times for 
help in the terrible situation in 
which the world is today. It will 
not be enough to give a dollar 
or two dolars, or one hundred 
dollars. To do the most good 
and to follow the right philoso- 
phy, you will have to give your- 
self. You will have to give time, 
patience, pity, kind words, and 
help in every way you can to 
make the lot of thousands 'of 
homeless and hopeless people bet- 
ter, and revive again in the world 
the real Christian spirit which is 
expressed by these last two words: 
Give Thyself.'' 




s Lecture 



(Continued from page 1) 

of one or both parties. While 
drunkenness may be a disease in 
some respects, self-control might 
have stopped the onset if used in 
time. Nothing makes me feel 
the need of self-control more than 
the chain-smoker, who, with trem- 
bling lingers, lights one cigarette 
after another and apparently can- 
not work unless his eyes and nose 
are filled with the smoke of to- 
bacco and burning paper. Such 
people have lost control of them- 
selves. Many serious crimes can 
be laid to the same lack of self- 
j control. It is certainly a good 
I philosophy to cultivate self-con- 
! trol. 

"The third philosophy - -Give 
Thyself — is that of Christ. His 
whole life was an example of it. 
He gave his time, strength, his 
all, including his life, to impress 



Hughes' Talk 

(Continued from page 1) 

late another interesting incident 
in Dr. Gallaudet's life. Once, after 
his reteirement, he was invited 
to make a speech to the students 
here. His theme centered on 
never being satisfied. He stated 
that on a trip to Europe he visit- 
ed a famous museum. While look- 
ing at a statue made by the fam- 
ous sculptor, Thorwaldsen, he 
overheard an admirer remark, "If 
I could carve like that, I would 
stop in satisfaction," to which the 
sculptor, who was present, replied 
that he should never be satisfied 
even after he had done his best. 
Upon concluding this lecture, Dr. 
Gallaudet was showered with 
much praise and presented with 
flowers as he descended the plat- 
form. Whereupon he said, "I am 
tempted ... I am tempted to be 
satisfied." 

After the talk, a reel of motion 
pictures, owned by the National 
Association of the Deaf, was 
shown of Dr. Gallaudet recount- 
ing in the sign language his visit 
to the Lorna Doone Country in 
Devonshire, England. This reel 
was the first ever taken of the 
sign language in motion pictures. 
Dr. Gallaudet's beautiful use of 
signs was evident in the movie. 



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that likes a gentle accent . : . that remains in- 
flexible to much hard wear . . . that comes in 
many a good tweedy color. . . the glove you 
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March 


25 





THE BUfF 




K. (*. Banquet 
March 25 



Volume LIT. Xumber 9 



GALLAUDET COLLEGE. KENDALL GREEN. WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Friday, March 3, 1944 



College Students Serve 
American Red Cross 



Here's How You All 
Can Help, Too! 



r 



It was 5:30 a.m. Out of his 
tent pitched in an olive grove 
crawled "Penny" Pennington, 
American Red Cross assistant 
field director, to get the fii'st mail 
he had received since landing 
with the troops in Italy: a letter 
from "Who's Who." 

Back in New York some of the 
former students of Dr. R. Corbin 
Pennington, City College profes- 
sor, were probably getting in a 
little midnight cramming, fully 
aware that if they never go to 
war, the war has already come 
to them by way of the things 
those still on the campus can, and 
must, do. They can, for example, 
suport the work of the American 
Red Cross, in which college stu- 
dents have a two-fold stake: 
their fellow students are both 
serving and being served by the 
Red Cross. 

A wide variety of schools and 
colleges, and many parts of the 
country, are represented in the 
ranks of the American Red Cross 
workers. The staff of an American 
Red Cross club in North Africa 
has included, for instance, form- 
er students at William and Mary, 
Colorado State, Lake Forest and 
Middlebury colleges. 

Some of these Red Cross work- 
ers have left their academic in- 
terests behind. Others are fol- 
lowing the professional line for 
which their college work prepared 
them. In the latter group are 
social workers, playground and 
and athletic directors, while form- 
er teachers, research assistants 
and others are serving coffee and 
doughnuts from the hatch of a 
clubmobile, writing letters for 
the wounded, or doing other jobs 
new to them. 

College students are serving 
the American Red Cross on the 
home front, too. In many colleges 
throughout the country the stu- 
dents run their own campus Red 
. — .V- — ■ — 

Fusfeld Gives Timely 
Lecture in Chapel 

Regular assembly in Chapel 
Hall Sunday evening, February 
20, brought Dean Irving S. Fus- 
feld to the time-honored plat- 
form. The theme of his talk was 
"What It Takes to Make Good 
in College." In his lecture Dean 
Fusfeld explained the generally 
accepted concept of college, which 
was special training to aid young 
men and women in later life. He 
stated, however, that youth is 
prone to overlook the fact that 
life now moves so rapidly that 
sometimes college education is 
not entirely adequate by the time 
the student is graduated. In or- 
der to remedy this matter, a col- 
lege should train its students to 
meet changes as they occur. 

Dean Fusfeld also gave some 
statistics collected by Professor 
Hugh Hartshorne of Yale Univer- 
sity in a recent survey among 
college students. Professor Hart- 
shorne found that of the 300,000 
students enrolled annually as 
Freshmen in American universi- 
ties and colleges, 100,000 failed 
to complete the first year of col- 
lege, and of the remainder another 
50,000 failed to complete the 
course. Out of twenty average 
boys and girls completing high 
school, only six started upon a 
college education, and only four 
of these six went through their 
Freshman year in college, and 
only three of the original twenty 
were graduated from college. 
Factors which aided those com- 
pleting their college work were 
found to be good health, contact 



Dr. Best Make Keller Announces 

Donation to Library i Engagement 



Cross units. And everywhere they 
are participating in essential Red 
Cross activities on and off the 
campus. The Red Cross flag flies 
regularly outside campus build- 
ings to announce that coeds are 
busy knitting and sewing and 
making bandages for the Red 
Cross. Club and fraternity groups 
sign up in a body for visits to 
Red Cross blood donor centers. 
And everywhere college girls are 
serving as Red Cross volunteers 
in hospitals and canteens. 

As a sort of symbol of their 
two-fold stake in the continuation 
of its work, the American Red 
Cross serves college students as 
a meeting ground, and American 
Red Cross clubs overseas are fre- 
quently the scene of collegiate 
reunions. It was not by accident, 
for instance, that Sigma Chi 
brothers now with our armed 
forces in Britain chose an Ameri- 
can Red Cross club for a recent 
reunion dinner. Those who have 
left campus to serve their coun- 
try miss the companionship of 
college life. But, through the 
American Red Cross ,it is possi- 
ble for them to get together for 
a coke or a bull session that 
brings Alma Mater closer and 
makes the war seem, for the 
moment, very far away. 

The American Red Cross pro- 
gram of service to our armed 
forces is world-wide and involves 
figures that would stagger even 
a statistics major. In Britain the 
American Red Cross clubs serve 
half a milion meals a month, and 
a comparable number are served 
monthly in the Mediterranean 
area. C ! . ?, . a roacli odex* at 
airfields, ant-aircraft installations 
and bivouac areas. 

These and all other Red Cross 
activities are dependent for their 
continued existence upon volun- 
tary gifts and contributions. Dur- 
ing March all college students 
will be called upon to support 
the work of the American Red 
Cross by contributing to the 1944 
Red Cross War Fund. Let's give! 



"Deafness and the Deaf 
In the United States 1 ' 



Freshmen Present 
Literary Program 

Saturday evening, February 12, 
the Freshman Class took the floor 
at the Literary Society meeting. 
Mervin Gairetson introduced the 
program with a somewhat ab- 
stract poem, "Abraham Lincoln 
Walks at Midnight." Keith Lange 
then depicted an interesting arti- 
cle from the Saturday Evening 
Post, "My Favorite War Story." 
In rhythmic signs, Thomas Fish- 
ier presented Scott's famous and 
daring poem, "Lochinvar." Next 
on the platform was the versatile 
Marvin Marshall with another of 
his witty uales — this time one 
about a king's daughter who could 
not be made to shed tears. The 
final number was a short amusing 
dialogue between Calton James 
and Robert: Kleberg, entitled "Old 
Woman, Will You?" Its abrupt 
conclusion left the audience in 
stitches. All in all, the program 
was very good and well presented. 



with homes, church interest, good 
economical habits, social interests, 
morals and discipline, personality, 
wholesome living conditions, 
scholarshin, and broadened inter- 
ests in things outside college life. 
Further probing disclosed more 
definite reasons for the successful 
completion of college courses. 
These reasons included: Member- 
ship in literary circles and foreign 
language clubs, seven hours of 
study each day, scheduled usage 
of time, self-dependence, definite 
aims, social adjustment, a sense 
of values, and careful deliberation 
before acting. 



The college library is deeply 
indebted to Dr. Harry Best, of 
the University of Kentucky, Lex- 
ington, Ky., for the gift of his 
book, "Deafness and the Deaf in 
the United States," recently pub- 
lished by the Macmillan Company. 

"Deafness and the Deaf in the 
United States" is a most compre- 
hensive book, summing up the 
problems of the deaf in human 
society. About one-fifth of this 
work is devoted to the possibili- 
ties of the prevention of deafness. 
He has dedicated his book "To 
those bearing a grievous burden 
a n d the most misunderstood 
among the sons of men, but the 
'gamest' of them all." Dr. Best 
has spent nearly thirty years in 
studying all that has been written 
on the subject of the deaf and is 
considered by the profession to 
bo an authority. 

Dr. Best received an M. A. 
degree from the Normal Training 
department at Gallaudet College 
in 1902, has taught deaf children, 
and has contributed articles to 
encyclopedias and sociological 
magazines. He is also the author 
of "Blindness and the Blind in 
the United States" and "Crime 
and Criminal Law in the United 
States." 

The library wishes to make 
known its grateful appreciation 
for this useful gift. 

V 

A heated argument seldom 
throws light on the subject. 



Miss Adelaide Keller announced 
her engagement to Dr. Leon A. 
Heppel at a bridge luncheon at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ken- 
neth Temple on Saturday after- 
noon, February 12. Lady friends, 
most of them living on the cam- 
pus, attended the luncheon. The 
announcement was in the form 
of a red bridge valentine on which 
was written : 

"The Dealer — Dan Cupid 

The Bid — Two Hearts 

Those Vulnerable — Adelaide 
and Leon 

The Score — Engagemeent" 

Miss Keller, who had been on 
the Gallaudet College faculty for 
five years, is now nutritionist in 
the Public Schools of Washington, 
D. C. While teaching at Gallau- 
det College, she was instructor in 
Applied Art and Home Economics. 
Born in Ephrata, Pa., she at- 
tended Cedar Crest College, but 
was graduated from Drexel In- 
stitute of Technology in Home 
Economics in 1938. She is a 
member of Omicron Nu, Phi Kap- 
pa Phi, and Delta Sigma Gamma. 

Dr. Heppel is from San Francis- 
co, Calif. He is Past Assistant 
Surgeon (R) in the U. S. Public 
Health Service, the rank of which 
is equivalent to that of a Lieu- 
tenant in the Navy. He works 
at the National Institute of Health 
at Bethesda, Md. He received 
his Ph. D. in bio. chemistry from 
the University of California in 
193 7, and his M. D. from the Uni- 
versity of Rochester in 19 41. He 
is a member of Alpha Omega Al- 
pha (honorary medical fraterni- 
ty), Phi Be + .a Kappa, and Sigma 
Xi. 



Leap Year Affair Makes 
Big Hit with Student Body 



Does a College 
Education Help? 

If it helps the hearing, why 
shouldn't it help the deaf? 

This is an old question that 
comes up periodically in ex- 
changes that come to us. One 
answer given some time ago was 
to this effect. Why it should be 
asked is hard to imagine, except 
that the answer it requires may 
impress rising generations of high 
school boys and girls who have 
acquired that sense of sufficiency 
and complacency which is respon- 
sible for so many second-raters 
turned out. 

Several years ago, question- 
naires were sent to all graduates 
and ex-students of Gallaudet Col- 
lege whose addresses were known. 
Seven hundred and twenty-one 
replies were received. It was 
shown that former students were 
i engaged in at least eighty-two dif- 
ferent kinds of work. 

Some of the occupations were: 
Teaching, in which 156 were en- 
gaged; printing, 74; machine op- 
erating, 24; acting as supervisors 



Stars of 'Arsenic and Old Lace" Meet 



Upperclassmen at Gallaudet 
will clearly recall that certain 
Sunday in May, 1942, when the 
Gallaudet Dramatic Club jour- 
neyed to New York where they 
presented "Arsenic and Old Lace" 
in the Fulton Theatre. 

Recently we ran across an 
article from the Flint, Michigan 
Journal referring to this presen- 
tation and praising Mr. Eric 
Malzkuhn, who was a member of 
the Class of '4 3 and also served 
as Head Senior. This article is 
quoted below: 

"When 'monsters' meet, it is 
just like the get-together of any 
other two shy, retiring, peace- 
loving men. 

"That at least, was the scene 
backstage at the Palace Theatre 
when Boris Karloff, star of "Ar- 
senic and Old Lace," beamed his 
delight at seeing again Eric Malz- 
kuhn, 24-year-old Michigan 



School for the Deaf teacher here. 
, " 'You get around almost as 
much as I do,' Karloff rumbled 
pleasantly, vigorously pumping 
the hand of his deaf friend and 
former protege. 

"The reunion harked back to 
that eventful evening of Sunday, 
May 10, 1942, when, before a 
packed house in New York's Ful- 
ton Theatre, it was Malzkuhn 
himself who played 'Arsenic's' 
villainous 'Jonathan' in a produc- 
tion presented entirely in sign 
language by fellow deaf students 
of Gallaudet College, Washing- 
ton, D. C. On that night 18 
months back, the really-genial 
Karloff 'made up' Malzkuhn for 
the part; Wednesday in Flint it 
was Malzkuhn's turn to do the 
same for the famous bad man of 
stage and screen. 

(Continued on page 3) 



Gallaudet Co-eds of the Olden Days 



By J. B. McDaniel 

The first co-eds appeared at 
Gallaudet College, then known as 
The National Deaf Mute College, 
some sixty-five years ago. We 
can imagine how happy the young 
men of the college were to have 
the ladies join them on the 
campus. These slim-waisted, full- 
bosomed, billowy-skirted figures 
gave the campus a better balance 
in the eyes of all but the impor- 
tant thing about the entrance of 
women into the only college for 
the deaf in the world was the op- 
portunity of higher education for 
deaf women. 

While young women were ad- 
mitted to the college department 
of the Columbia Institution for 
the Deaf as early as 187 8, the 
first to receive a degree in the 
course was Miss Alto M. Lowman, 
of Maryland, who was given the 
degree of Bachelor of Philosophy 
in 1892. Miss Lowman became a 
teacher in the State School for 
the Deaf in Frederick, Maryland. 
After teaching a number of years 
she married Mr. John Kavanaugh, 
of Baltimore. Mrs. Kavanaugh^. 1 



died in 1912. 

The first recipient of the Bach- 
elor of Arts degree at Gallaudet 
College in 189 3 was Miss Agatha 
M. Tiegel, of Pennsylvania. She 
was the first president of the 
O. W. L S., which was founded 
in 1892. She became a teacher 
in the State School for the Deaf 
in Faribault, Minnesota. Miss 
Tiegel married Dr. Olaf Hanson, 
of the class of 1886, who was for 
some time a successful architect, 
but later became a minister to 
the deaf, with headquarters at 
Seattle, Washington. 

Since Dr. Hanson's death Mrs. 
Hanson has spent a good deal of 
time in Washington, D. C, and 
has been quite active in the 
Washington Alumni Group. She 
established a fund in memory of 
her husband, the income from 
which supports the Olaf Hanson 
Award, given annually to the 
young man in the Senior class of 
Gallaudet College who excels in 
character and leadership. 

Misses Lily A. Bicksler, of 
Pennsylvania, and Hannah 
(Continued on page 3) 



Floor Show Is Chief 
Attraction 



The Leap Year dance was held 
in the Old Jim on Saturday night 
February 19, under the auspices 
of the Y. W. C. A. Arrayed in 
vari-colored formals and eyes 
alight at the special privilege, the 
co-eds escorted their dates to the 
gym. On the receiving line were 
Frances Lupo, '44, President of 
the Y.W.C.A; Ralph White, '46; 
and Professor and Mrs. William 
McClure, chaperons. 

A big red heart barred the 
entrance to the dance floor but 
a crack in its scarlet center 
enabled the couples to step thru. 
Right under the center light 
hung a chandelier of hearts, and 
from here white crepe streamers 
hung down to the sides of the 
gym. The walls were adorned 
with identical red hearts with the 
names of the various "campus 
sweethearts" scribbled on them. 
At one end was a huge white 
valentine bordered with red 
crepe paper, with "Bill loves 
Mary Lil" written across it. 
These names, of course, referred 
to the popular chaperons. On the 
opposite end, encircled by green 



in schools for the deaf, 18; work- 
ing as laborers, 16; employed as ferns and with a large heart- 
chemists, 13; photography, 3; li- shaped candy box for a back- 
brary work, 5; drafting, 6. . ground, the McKAnley High 

received degrees, 291 School band sent out strains of 



367 

owned their homes, and 11 were 
buying homes. 266 owned their 
property, while 2 33 owned and 
drove automobiles. 

It was also found that the av- 
erage salary of the former stu- 
dents was $150 a month. 

The last paragr: .?>:. of the above 
is the answer to the money ques- 
tion — does it pay? The average 
salary of the 721 was $1,800 a 
year. Seven hundred and twenty- 
one who attended Gallaudet Col- 
lege were paid $1,197,000 for 
their year's work. Is there any 
other group of 721 deaf who re- 
ceive that much? — The Ephpheta 



v 



Concert Centers on 
St. Valentine's Day 

The theme of the Freshman 
Class Concert, held in Chapel 
Hall on the evening of February 
13, was a very appropiate one, 
being that of the Italian patric- 
ian, St. Valentine. With a few 
brief introductory r e m a r k s, 
Thomas Fishier opened the pro- 
gram. Mr. Fishier was followed 
by Marjoriebell Stakley, who 
gave a beautiful rendition of the 
poem, "New Friends and Old 
Friends." Robert Stanley then 
took the platform and went into 
interesting details explaining the 
why and wherefore of St. "Valen- 
tine's Day. Estella Wood gave 
a somewhat warm and amusing 
story of a boy, his teacher, and a 
note. Following Miss Wood's 
story, Keith Lange signed Robert 
Burns' beautiful poem, "Flow 
Gently Sweet Afton" with rhythm 
and feeling. The program was 
then brought to a close with a 
prayer given by Agnes Minor. 

V 

BOWLING IS NEW 
ATTRACTION FOR CO-EDS 

A group of co-eds recenty took 
an interest in bowling as a part 
of their sports program. The 
group meets every Friday after- 
noon at the bowling alleys on H 
Street, and bowls two games a 
week. Scores range from 70 to 
91, which are considered good 
for a beginners' group. 

Members of the group are 
Misses Todd, J. Burg, Sladek, Pet- 
rick, C. Burg, Carr, Faux, Slat- 
tery, Intermill, Freret, and 
Bushey. Manager of the group 
is C. Burg, and Carr is the trea- 
surer. 



cheerful music for the twenty 
dances on the card. 

"With a sparkle in their eyes, 
and a smile on their lips", the 
co-eds signed up for their va- 
rious dances, and soon the gym 
was transformed into a colorful 
ballroom as tbe swaying, rain- 
bow-draped couples glided across 
the floor. 

During the intermission, an en- 
tertainment floor show was pre- 
sented with Miss Lupo as Mis- 
tress of Ceremonies. Marjorie 
Case, '46, in a Spanish costume 
(Continued on page 3) 
__ y 

Douglas Belongs to 
Uncle Sam Now 



One by one, from the ranks of 
the teaching profession, our 
friends depart for servicce under 
Uncle Sam. This time Albert W. 
Douglas, member of the Normal 
Class of '41, and of the teaching 
staff of the American School for 
the Deaf at Hartford, Conn., has 
gone over to the Army. To quote 
The .American Era: 

"On December 28, 1943 Mr. 
Albert W. Douglas of our staff 
was called up for service in the 
Army. He left West Hartford for 
Camp Devens with a group of 
inductees on that date and made 
a very good start on his Army 
career by being chosen as acting 
corporal for the trip to Devens. 

Mr. Douglas has taught on our 
staff for the past two years in 
which time he won the warm 
regard of both the staff and the 
students. This year he was doing 
double service as a teacher and 
part-time supervisor." 

Those who remember him at 
Gallaudet wish him the best of 
luck and hope that he enjoys 
army life. 

V 

"T. H. GALLAUDET" NOW 
ON HIGH SEAS 



Some time ago The Silent 
Broadcaster carried an item re- 
vealing further information on 
the "Thomas H. Gallaudet," the 
Liberty tanker launched on Octo- 
ber 21 in Wilmington, Calif. 
Under lend-lease procedure, the 
ship has gone into service for 
the Soviet Union. She was fitted 
for service by Russians and divi- 
sion manned by a Russian crew. 
Long may she do credit to the 
memory of our benefactor! 



PAGE TWO 



The Buff and Blue 



Friday, March 3, 1944 



The Buff and Blue 



Published once a month during October, De- 
cember, April and twice a month during Novem- 
ber, January, February, March and May. Entered 
at the Post Office at Washington as second-class 
mail matter. 

Subscription Price $2.00 per year 

(Payable in advance) 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Malvine Fischer, '4 4 

LITERARY EDITOR Bertt Lependorf, '4 4 

NEWS EDITOR Byron Hunziker, '46 

SPORTS EDITOR Lyle A. Wiltse, '4 6 

ASS'T SPORTS ED (Jlarhelen Wilkins, '45 

ALUMNI EDITOR Winfield S. Runde, '01 

ASSOCIATES 

Robert Panara, '45 Earl Elkins, '46 

Christel Erdmann, '4 6 

REPORTERS and COLUMNISTS 

Caroline Tillinghast. ".4 Carlie Todd, '44 
John Randolph, '45 Calvin George, '45 

Betty-Jo Raines, '4t» Jean Smith, '4 6 

Ralph White, '4 6 Nadine Nicho'ls, '4 6 

Earline Becker, '4 7 Thomas Fishier, '47 

Mervin Garretson, '4 7 

BUSINESS MANAGER Calv.n George, '45 

ASS'T BUSINESS MANAGER . Donald Padden '45 
CIRCULATION MANAGER . Harold Steinman, '46 
ADVERTISING MANAGER . Charles Pollock, '44 

ASS'T ADV. MANAGERS . . Frank Sladek, '46 

Wayne Schlieff, P. C. 

PRINTERS 
Leonard J. Meyer, '44, FOREMAN 
William Brightwell, '4 6 Jason Amnions, '47 
Bertt Lependorf, '44 Wayne Furlong, '4 6 

Charles Pollock, '44 

PROOFREADER Eugene Schick, '47 



!!ii.,lll,,IMI,iill i,iJII:!:!ii>iilJllliill[:illl.!liij;i:;l!i.!lll.iJllil!llllllllllllilll!^ 



As We See It 

Jean Smith, '46 



lli.PI!:ill:.i:i: 




"EVEN THIS SHALL PASS AWAY" 

The day of reckoning m at hand. Just 
around the corner is neither prosperity nor a 
rainbow, but the dreaded ordeal of mid-year 
exams. At this point, no doubt, we should as- 
sume a scholarly attitude and suggest that he 
who lias done his work faithfully all semester 
has no cause for worry now. But somehow, we 
don't feel up to it. Such an idea, frankly, fail; 
to elicit any response from us. Surrounded as 
we are by equally unhappy associates, we can 
only brood on our misery. 

Among the authorities', the predominant 
opinion is that examinations are a necessary 
evil. Their "evilness" we readily admit; their 
necessity we wholeheartedly regret. Our om 
comfort regarding this unwelcome trial might 
be that "Even this shall pass away," but the 
word pass has rather frightening associations. 
Devoid of any consolation, therefore, we shall 
be for several days completely dejected, thor- 
oughly discouraged, and very, very ignorant. 
Consequently, we can only wish you the best o 
luck, and since hope springs eternal, 

May exams be merry and bright, 
And may all your answers be right. 

— Trinity Times, 



-V- 



READ TO LEARN ENGLISH 

Through reading, and reading alone, can 
you get that repetition of words' necessary to en- 
able the deaf child to master the English lan- 
guage. 

A, deaf child can read in a couple of hours 
more words than a hearing child can hear in the 
course of a whole day. Just think of that and 
what it means to us. It is reading, reading, 
reading, that will give our pupils the mastery 
of the English language. 

If you look upon the history of our schools, 
1 think you will recognize the fact that the 
successful pupils under any method of instruc- 
tion, have one and all been great readers. 

— Dr. Alexander Graham Bell 



-V- 



Take it from a Sophomore, 
there's more to Chemistry than 
those fabulous nerve-wracking 
equations and nose-twisting 
odors. Here's some truly pala- 
table stuff concerning carbon 
that you, whose knowledge of 
this subject is limited to car- 
bon copies, can pleasantly di- 
gest: 

As a patient in a hospital, 
did you ever notice that the 
nurse takes out your flowers in the evening? That 
doesn't mean that you're going to die — only that 
you are being spared a headache. Briefly, plants 
go goofy minus their beloved sunlight and func- 
tion in reverse. So, the plant would steal all your 
nice 'oxygen, leaving you to breathe carbon dioxide, 
which is a fraternity brother of Aspirin. Carbon 
dioxide is not a toxic, although an animal dies 
from lack of oxygen when compelled to breathe 
an atmosphere which contains too large a propor- 
tion of carbon dioxide. It is added to the oxygen 
used in lung motors for reviving a person recover- 
ing from electrical shock or drowning because the 
carbon dioxide stimulates the respiratory organs 
and causes more rapid breathing. 

Artincal diamonds have been prepared by ob- 
taining crystals of carbon under high pressure. 
This imitates the process by which the greatest 
chemist, Mother Nature, is thought to have 
operated on a large scale in the production of 
natural diamonds. 

You can make your own fire extinguisher with 
water, vinegar, and a baking soda which will give 
you carbon dioxide that smothers the fire. The 
chemical engine used by fire departments operates 
in a similar way. 

Carbon dioxide, used in baking, gives the 
desired lightness to products. As it is baked, the 
gas is entrapped in the dough and causes it to 
swell and produce a porous material which is 
more appetizing and more easily digested than 
unleavened products. (And Rippe thought they 
used carbon dioxide so there would be more 
bread!) So when you do the Conga in the 
kitchen, you hasten this process and the bread 
or cake isn't as light and porous as it should be. 
That's why "Mutiny in the Kitchen" is fatal to 
Mom's masterpiece in the oven. 

If Doc ever rations our cokes, good ole 
chemistry will see you through. Your coke is 
plain carbonated water anyway, but if you insist 
on "the real thing," bring over your own coloring. 
For a real, genuine color, try iodine! 

Professor Kline is either a farmer at heart or 
a leader of some new theory. Anyway, he insists 
that we are all dirt! For the sake of sensitive 
souls, we will illustrate with a pig, which is more 
likely to help Mr. Kline win his point, anyway. 
"Porky" lives chiefly on plants, and these plants 
are derived from the soil and air, so that makes 
him indirectly dirt. "Ashes to ashes; dirt to 
dirt?" 

Suffer from acid stomach? The doctor will 
give you a base as a medicine. So when you are 
downing your Milk of Magnesia, remember that 
you are neutralizing the acid in your stomach 
with a base. Likewise, a victim of arsenic poison- 
ing is given a base to neutralize the acid and make 
it solid before it enters the blood stream so it 
can be safely removed from the stomach. By 
the way, a carbon monoxide death is painless and 
less trouble. If you have a car, just leave it 
running in a closed garage and curl up with a 
good novel. You don't even have to figure up 
your income tax if you try this. 

In mines, a canary or a mouse is taken down 
into a trapped area if it is suspected that the 
miners have been overcome by fumes. If the ani- 
mal swoons, the rescuers know that there is car- 
bon monoxide present and return equipped with 
oxygen masks to recover their unconscious vic- 
tims. 

Carbon is also used in some cosmetics. Nox- 
zema, a widely-used skin cream, contains some car- 
bolic acid. Mascara is from carbon and perfume 
from coal. Talcum powder from talc. 

Now we know what the expression, "You can't 
judge a book by its cover," really means. 



r 



The Hurdy Gurdy 

Nadine Nichols, '46 & John Randolph, '45 



Nio man can tell whether he is rich or poor 
by turning to his ledger. It is his heart that 
makes a man rich. He is rich according to 
what he is, not what he has. 

— Henry Ward Beecher 




Grin and bear it! Oh Yeah! 
Here is Sladek proudly and 
dominantly showing the Par- 
sons just how it is done. . Mis 
boiling of eggs. . .when up 
shows Mrs. Tempi", who wi ;t 
poignant cry, springs upon c ur 
would-be-cook. "No, no, Mavy, 
you must never do that!' 
Roses are red. . . 

Could it be that Gary Is 
worrying about his girlish fig- 




ure? Then why the daily run-around? 

"Now, listen here, Slats," says Toddy, "turn 
that radio off... too much static," and she went 
back to her room. Meekly, Slats closed her book 
and ceased her speech-practicing. 

A number of Romeos under the auspices of 
Berg and Co. gallantly serenaded under Hogan's 
window on her birthday. And she was anything 
but a tragic-looking Juliet. 

Did anyone, by any chance, happen to notice 
how natural the "catskins" looked on the Senior 
girls in their performance at the Senior Circus? 
Was it acting? We're still wondering, too, how 
J. Burg got down that cannon neck. All in all, 
though, everyone enjoyed the circus ... including 
the Seniors. 

Leap Year has been in effect 
for quite some time, but, as 
of yet, unattached Fowler Hal- 
lites seem to be making no use 
of their opportunity for the 
snaring of unwary males. The 
whole thing sounds incredible, 
but perhaps the ladies are be- 
coming more refined than ever 
before and do not wish to 
lower their dignity just for a 
mere man. The next few 
months will tell... Berg advertised, in the Men's 
Dining Room, for someone to accompany him to 
the Pix. This handsome specimen of manhood 
must be needing a bodyguard to protect him from 
the femmes . . . Plotitsky, the Chemistry fiend, 
does a really good job as candy salesman for the 
Senior Class, but here's hoping he doesn't accident- 
ly mix some sulfuric acid in with the stock . . . 
Robinson and his two hundred pounds of five feet 
six seems to be doing well despite all this wartime 
talk of food shortage . . . Sperry is rapidly gain- 
ing a reputation for "Oomph" among his class- 
mates, which is really something. . .Wiltse of 
late has been a frequent visitor in Hunziker's 
room. "Hunky" is an old hand on love-making, 
so draw your own conclusions. . .Ayers as Head 
Junior is rapidly becoming the most popular 
figure in College Hall. The reason? The Head 
Junior also acts as the mailman for College 
Hallers. . . ."Witless" Witzcak and his gang do an 
excellent job of staying up late. TViiat a success 
he would be if he should capitalize on this parti- 
cular ability by organizing a night club on Ken- 
dall Green! .. . Babs Sanderson mase a surprise 
visit last week. Her appearance was a sight for 
sore eyes, and for Panara, too. 

[laillllllllllillllllllllM 

j Reader's Dri-Jest j 

Caroline Tillinghast, '44 



Bus conductor, calling from 
the upper deck: Is there a 
mackintosh down there big 
enough to keep two young 
ladies warm? 

Voice from below: No, but 
there is a McDaniel that's 
willing to try- 

* □ * 

Mally: Tilly, I didn't like 
the jokes in the paper last 
week. 
That's funny. I threw some of them in 
furnace and the fire roared! 

* n * 




Tilly: 

the 



I think that I shall never see, 
A "D" as lovely as a "B". 

A "B" whose rounded form is pressed 
Upon the records 'Of the blessed. 

"D's" are made by fools like me, 
But only prigs can make a "B". 



Dear Moron, 



* □ * 



I sat down, pencil in hand to typewrite you a 
letter. Pardon the ink, I don't live where I used 
to live because I moved to where I live now. 
When you come to see me you can ask anyone 
where I live because nobody knows. I am sorry 
we are so far together. I wish we were closer 
apart. 

My Aunt Nellie died and is doing nicely. I hope 
you are the same. My cousin has the mumps and 
is having a swell time. She is at death's door 
and the doctor is trying to pull her through. We 
having more weather this year than last year. 
I sent you a coat by express. I cut the buttons 
off to make it lighter. If you want them they are 
in the pockets. 

I started to Washington to see you. I saw a 
sign and it said "This will take you to Washing- 
ton." I got on and sat for three hours but the 
darn thing wouldn't move. 

My neighbor's baby swallowed some pins but 
they fed her a pincushion. Now everything's all 
right. In case you didn't get this letter let me 
know and I will send it to you. 

In this envelope is a picture of me, but for fear 
of losing it I took it out. Hope you like it. I 
forgot to enclose the money I owe you, but I 
sealed the envelope before I remembered. 

Your pal, 

Another Moron. 

P. S. Did you hear about the Moron who was ar- 
rested because he didn't have moron? 



Mr. Kline: This jar contains deadly gas. What 

steps would you take if it escaped? 
Berg: Long ones. 

* □ * 

He sipped the cider from her lips, 
As beneath the moon they sat, 
And wondered if any guy before 
Had drunk from a mug like that. 

x □ * 

Norwood : I see in the paper that a fellow ate six 

dozen pancakes. 
Murphy: Oh, how waffle! 

"Will you marry me if I have my health reju- 
venated?" asked the millionaire octogenarian. 

"I'll marry you alright", said sweet young Ar- 
lene, "i;i:' you !eave your health the way it is." 

"You look r.weet enough to eat," 

He whispered soft and low. 
"I am," she said quite hungrily. 

"Where do you want to go?" 

* Q* 

Leppy: Here is the plot of my new story. It 
is midnight. Two burglars creep toward the house, 
and as they enter the clock strikes one. . . 

Jo: Which one? 

An instructor in the London Medical College 
was appointed honorary physician to the King. 
He put a notice in his classroom reading: "Profes- 
sor Jennings informs his classes that he has been 
appointed honorary physician to His Majesty, 
King George VI." 

When he returned the following day, he found 
a new notice reading, "God Save the King." 

Campus Chatter ] 

I Betty-Jo Raines, '46 & Ralph White, '46 j 



l!ll!I!!lll!!ll!:!ll!!!ll!i!li!i!ll|:i!llll]||||||l!illlllll!ll!!li 



juiiiiuirtf. m 



It looks as if we will be 

1 enjoying our afternoons out at 

j Hotchkiss Field soon again for 

"j the track boys are starting to 

practice early for what we 

hope will be a successful 

season. 

Allan J. Adams, '43, and 
Betty June Abel of New York 
were married Sunday evening, 
February 20, in the Garden 
Room of the Ambassador Hotel 
in New York. Bertt Lependorf, '44, and Betty Jo 
Raines, '4 6, were invited to attend tTie ceremony 
and the reception that followed. Mr. Lependorf 
was best man. Congratulations and best wishes 
for the newlyweds are in order. 

The Leap Year Dance was an "affair of hearts", 
and so James Davis, ex-'44, came to escort June 
King, '44, to the dance, and Jack Falcon, '43, to 
be with Virgie Bourgeois, '44. Everyone had a 
wonderful time, so we are told. 




ff 



The Poet's Pack 

Contributions Made by the Student Body 



WHAT'S IN A NAME? 

(Composed on an overheated western-bound train: 
Dedicated to the gang I left behind. ) 

Upon Bald Ridge a Fischer 

' Stark looney guy was he^ 

Was Hatching Stacks of Hensley 

To catch Hodock in the sea. 

From the Temple came a Parson 

To lure him to Depew; 

Says he, "The Goodwin mercy. 

I'll make a Newman of you." 

Next came a worried Miller 

To hire him Intermill, 

Then a Marshall and a Meyer 

To take him from the Hill. 

Raines filled up the horse tank, 

His wife didn't live to tell 

How she gave Herrmann a cleaning 

And Brightwell became Blackwell. 

Now White he was, but angry, 

His clothes were Rippe, all 

His Barnes reduced to embers 

Then the King sent from nis Hall: 

A Butler with hot Wilkins 

A Taylor to give him tails 

A Barber to trim his whiskers 

And a Smith to dig his nails; 

A Carr driven by Watson 

Inside sat a Ruge-red lass 

To Seymour entered our Chapin 

Watson sped down the pass. 

She feed him Hamlin and Sperry 

And Mcintosh by the ton, 

She Holcomb her red tresses 

Him Feeley the world spun. 

Down Ridpath they took our hero 

On a prison cot he cries 

The Doctor pronounced him loco 

And Doctor don't tell lies. 

Folks, such creatures are Samples 
Whom women glorify 
Wherever mere man tramples 
Women their deeds magnify. 

— Jean Smith, '46. 



Friday, March 3, 1944 



The Buff and Blue 



PAGE THKEE 



'illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllHlilllllllllllllllllllllillllhliliiiiililllil.ua. 

{SPORT SLANTS 

5 by Lyle Wiltse 



At the feverish rate the Gallaudet College variety basketball 
squad has been progressing throughout the current season, there is 
hardly any alternative but to turn out a genuine bit of private cus- 
sology and blasphemy along that line. It seems rather a distaste- 
ful course to take, but the team might just as well turn to varsity 
bench warming for the remainder of the season and save ye Sports 
Ed a few of those long weary hours of mental torture spent behind 
the typewriter attempting to devise ways and means linguistically 
whereby the morale of the little man behind the ball may be kept 
somewhere within the realms of hope, faith and charity. Just such 
a move would likewise save both Coach Sullivan and Graduate Man- 
ager McClure from the agonizing prospect of bald heads as well as 
let up on the pressure on basketball Manager Panara's cranium 
which has lately been sapping him somewhat of his literary efforts. 
The Blues have accumulated only five victories out of some fifteen 
games which can be labeled a better than none at all. By a recent 
vote of the Mason-Dixon Conference members, it was decided that 
eight teams will be allowed to compete in the tourney to be held in 
Baltimore March 2, 3, 4. Team standing at present, in conformity to 
the above ruling is as follows: 1. Catholic University; 2. Mount St. 
Mary's College; 3. Loyola College; 4. Delaware University; 5. Amer- 
ican University; 6. Gallaudet College; 7. Johns Hopkins University; 
8. Washington College. Gallaudet was fourth on the list until two 
recent setbacks, which, for face-saving reasons will not be men- 
tioned, shoved her down to sixth. Consequently, the Blues may find 
themselves up against one of the stronger teams at the opening gun 
of the Conference provided they are not eliminated from the ranks 
of the eligible eight by that time. It is apparent that the more potent 
outfits such as Catholic U. and Mount St. Mary's have been avoiding 
each other, neither having met the other on any court to date. Some- 
thing's in the wind. Catholic U. has held the leading role in the 
spotlight and it is probable that said team may be invited to Mad- 
ison Square Garden in New York City in March for the National 
A.A.U. tournament. There are a number of people on the campus 
who are willing to bet their shirts that, against such odds, the Blues 
aren't going to get far in the forthcoming big meet. We don't all 
want to be pessimistic, but let's commence to pray for a little of 
the good fortune which was bestowed upon us last season. 

Meanwhile, what has happened to the Junior Varsity team, the 
Jayvees as we affectionately call them? Little or nothing has here- 
tofore been mentioned of these versatile little men who play the 
lower hand. In between games with the D. C. Silents and the Ken- 
dall School squad as preliminary matches prior to the regular games 
at the Roosevelt High School gym, these boys have been participat- 
ing in such a long list of games as members of the Heurich League, 
a recreational league for the District of Columbia sponsored by Bill 
Heurich, a prominent Washington figure, that Ye Sports Ed. has 
long since abandoned the idea of keeping the world in general in- 
formed of the results of each game. One thing is definitely cer- 
tain, however, and that is that in nearly every case the opposing 
local teams have been too much for the Jayvees. They are still 
in there plugging and will be yet for some time to come. 



Blues Blaze Way 
lo Victory 



On February 11 the Blue Bi- 
sons trampled over their Ameri- 
can University opponents at 
Roosevelt High court to win, 36- 
31. The Bisons, irked by several 
consecutive defeats, put some pep 
into their playing and succeeded 
in offsetting the jinx that had ap- 
parently been hounding them for 
the preceding few weeks. 

In the first half, with the help 
of the Gallaudet rooters led by 
three riotous pep-leaders, "Nicky" 
Nichols, '46, Hershel Mouton, 
P. C, and "Aggie" Minor, '47, the 
Bisons scooted up to the lead and 
remained fixed in that position 
throughout the entire game. At 
the half the score was 16-13, 
which worried our boys plenty. 
In the third quarter they forged 
ahead by ten points, only to relax 
their blitz movement and lose 
five of the margin points by the 
end of the game. 

Scoring honors went to Bald- 
ridge and Holcomb of Gallaudet, 
who each copped fourteen points, 
and to Citenbaum of American 
who looped eleven points. Pad- 
den, Gallaudet guard, contributed 
much to the victory with his usual 
fast and daring floorwork. The 
score is as follows: 
GALLAUDET 

Baldridge 14 

Holcomb 14 

SchleilT 

Pad den 2 

Massey 2 

Fishier 4 



Y.W.C.A. Presents Program 

Members of the Gallaudet 
Young Women's Christian Assoc- 
iation presented a short program 
in the Girls' Reading Room on 
Friday afternoon, February 11. 
The program, which was of a 
Biblical character, was opened by 
a talk entitled "Life of Moses" 
by Estella Wood, '47. A group 
of girls, consisting of M. Cusca- 
den, '47; M. Case, '46; C. Wil- 
kins, '45; J. Lucas, P. C; B. 



Jack's Meat Market 

923 7th St., N. E. 

Fancy Groceries, Fruit And 

Vegetables 

Beer and Wine 

J. Greenstein, Prop. 



Stark, '45; E. Ridpath, 47; B. 
Taylor, P.C.; and A. Minor, '47, 
presented a group of playlets de- 
picting the Ten Commandments. 
Following the playlets, I. Hod- 
ock, P. C, presented an interest- 
ing recital, "The Burial of 
Moses." As a closing feature*, 
G. Intermill, P. C., gave a beauti- 
ful doxology. 

GALLAUDET CO-EDS 

Continued from Page 1 

Schankweiler, of Minnesota, were 
graduated in June, 1894, and 
since then e\ery year has seen 
young women receive diplomas. 
Among the earlier graduates one 
Miss May Martin, of New York, 
of the class of 18 95, became a 
much-loved member of the Gal- 
laudet College Faculty. 





Total 


36 


AMERICAN 


UNIVERSITY 




Citenbaum 




11 


Poston 




6 


Riddell 







Yow 




2 


R. Poston 




4 


Miller 




2 


Latimer 




6 




Total 

V 


31 



LEAP YEAR DANCE 

Continued from Page 1 



CASSON STUDIO 



Photographers of the 1943 Buff and Blue 



1305 Conn. Avenue, N. W 



DEcatnr 1833 



C3Mi!illilllin!lll!IIIIIIIC]llllllllllll[]IMIIIIiiilJi:3lllllllillllC3lllllllllli!e3llllllllll!!r2!i!: 



I GALLAUDET 



PHARMAGYI 



Phone Atlantic 8888 | 

1000 Flordia Ave., N. E. ■ Washington, D. C. 1 

:i!lillilE:llllllllli!l[3llllllllllll[]||||||||||||[3lllllllllll|[]||||||||||||C]||||||||||||[]||li!lllimn 



of varigated and gay hues, ren- 
dered an excellent and realistic 
impersonation of a South Ameri- 
can dancer, and Maxine Chapin, 
P. C, followed with "Coinin' 
Thru the Rye", quaintly curtsy- 
ing every now and then. A little 
skit was next on the program, 
featuring Agnes Minor, '47; 
Patricia Mcintosh, '47; and Mary 
Cuscaden, '47. It was an amusing 
satire, and carried quite a little 
weight, too. Julia Burg and 
Malvine Fischer, both '44, as 
"professional dancers" presented 
the grand finale. Miss Burg was 
attired in masculine garb and 
they stepped through a number 
of smooth, graceful dances, inter- 
rupting their rhythm occasionally 
to clown a little. Refreshments 
consisting of ice-cream and cook- 
ies were also served during the 
intermission. 

The dance was a remarkable 
success for both the co-eds and 
the men students, and the efforts 
of the Y. W. C. A. were far from 
being in vain. The committee in 
charge consisted of two "Y" offi- 
cers, Frances Lupo and Arlene 
Stecker, '44; and five others, Julia 
Burg, Malvine Fischer, '44; Celia 
Burg", Agnes Carr, '45; and Mar- 
jorie Case, '46. Sincere thanks 
are extended to Professor and 
Mrs. McClure for chaperoning. 



Blue Bisons Bow 
In Defeat; 52-35 



Gallaudet's Blue Bisons suffer- 
ed another defeat when the Loyola 
College team rolled steam-roller 
fashion over them to win with 
a final score of 52 to 35. The 
game was played in the Roosevelt 
High School court Saturday, Feb- 
ruary 19. 

The Bisons began a stampede 
of revenge during the first quar- 
ter setting an 11 to 9 pace with 
Don Padden, the most notorious 
Bison, out in front, horns blazing 
the trail. During the second quar- 
ter the Loyola team was more 
familiar with its ground and 
practically began to hamstring 
the Bisons, surging ahead to lead. 
This quarter ended with the Bi- 
sons falling short by a six point 
margin, 23-17. 

The final hall of the game 
found the Bisons in a discourag- 
ing state of affairs but faithful 
Don Padden still thundering on, 
trying to give the opposing quint 
a stiff contest with regular "never 
say die" spirit, but with little 
success, for the rivals seemed 
blessed with seven league boots 
that evening. The final score was 
52-35. 

GALLAUDET 

Summary: FG FT Pts 

Baldridge 13 5 

Mortensen 

Witczak 10 2 

Holcomb 3 17 

Schleiff 2 4 

Padden 6 1 13 

Massey 

Fishier 2 2 

Amnions 10 2 

Stanley 

Totals 14 7 35 
LOYOLA COLLEGE 

FG FT Pts 

Lacy 4 5 13 

Schanberger 3 6 

Gammarata 2 15 

Gisriel 4 19 

Bran no n 10 2 

Davis 11 

O'Conor 7 14 

Cohen 

McGarry 

Mohler 10 2 



Totals 



22 



~>2 



ARSENIC AND OLD LACE 

Continued from Page 1 



"Mild-mannered himself, Karl- 
off was struck by the same quali- 
ty in Eric Malzkuhn when the 
latter was first introduced to him 
after a performance of 'Arsenic' 
in New York. 

"The proposition broached by 
Malzkuhn, that his fellow deaf 
students be given the rights to 
put on the play in their own 
school, intrigued Karloff still 
more, and therein started the 
chain of events which brought 
sophisticated Manhattan playgo- 
ers one of their most fantastic 
entertainment attractions. 'If you 
are successful,' Karloff promised, 
'you may bring your troupe to 
New York.' Play rights which 
had been denied elsewhere were 
granted by the producers. Russel 
Crouse and Howard Lindsay, 
royalty free to Gallaudet College 
students. And so Eric Malz- 
kuhn's dream came true when an 
all-deaf cast for the first time put 
on a play on Broadway. 

"Eric himself was a 'fearsome 
Jonathan,' who 'signed his lines 
with clear-cut emphasis' accord- 



ing to rave notices from the cri- 
tics. The entire cast gave an ex- 
cellent performance, and their 
gestures were made intelligible 
to the audience by a reader who 
repeated tneir speeches audibly 
from the wings. 

'And thus the performance at 
the Palace had more than ordin- 
ary interest for Flint's Eric Malz- 
kuhn and his dramatic students 
at the Michigan School for the 
Deaf, who will undoubtedly be 
fired to fresh efforts by the ex- 
ample of what their mentor was 
able to acomplish despite his own 
handicap of total deafness." 
-V 

In the West Virginia Tablet 
Superintendent Krause says: 
"For the stone blind we do not 
provide glasses, neither hearing 
aids for the stone deaf. Though 
we use these hearing aids in our 
educational work, let not every- 
one think they can help him. 
Don't buy a hearing aid until by 
actual experience you are con- 
vinced they will help you hear 
words, not merely sounds." 
V 

Sir Richard Paget believes that 
we should consider the possibility 
of developing a systematic sign 
language as a world langauge. 
Such a language would be simple, 
more concise and less ambiguous 
than any spoken language, thinks 
Sir Richard. It would be easy to 
teach by means of movies and 
would offer no difficulties of pro- 
nounciation. A script would have 
to be invented. 

V 

ALUMNI NEWS 
Continued from page 4 



SHOP NEAR BY 



Gaffins 



Men's and Boys' Wear 



Dress and Sports Wear 



Work Clothing 



925 H Street, N. E. 



Phone TRindad 8833 



The deaf of Kentucky have 
nothing but praise for George 
Gordon Kannapell, '22. They set 
him up on a pedestal as the lead- 
ing worker for the welfare of the 
deaf. He is regarded as the 
sparkplug that tackled the Louis- 
ville Reynold's Metals Plant and 
caused the big concern to open its 
doors wide to the employment of 
the deaf. A letter to the Alumni 
Editor says — "Gordon's unsel- 
fishness in giving so much of his 
effort and time to help others is 
an example of what a Gallaudet 
man can do." It is good to know 
that the deaf of Kentucky feel 
that way. "Gratitude is the mem- 
ory of the heart." 

V 

Happy is the home and hearth 
of Francis C. Higgins, '36, and 
wife, (Catherine Bronson, '32). 
Cause? The arrival of a lovely 
little girl — Bonnie Mae. The fond 
parents, looking down at the 
child in her luxurious pink cov- 
ered bassinet, mentally think — 

"A lovely being, scarcely 
form'd or molded, 

A rose with all its sweetest 
petals yet folded." 

Catherine i s Domestic Science 
teacher and Francis has a regular 
class in the Kentucky School. 
During the summer Francis 
operated a linotype on a Danville 
newspaper. He learned the works 
at the New Jersey School. 
V 

Dwight W. Reeder, N-'29, for 
eighteen years a classroom teach- 
er in the Iowa and New Jersey 
Schools, has beeen elevated to the 
principalship of the Louisiana 
School. Dwight is a graduate of 
the Colorado State Teachers Col- 
lege and of the Normal Depart- 
ment of Gallaudet. His exper- 
ience should bring to the Louis- 
iana School the knowledge his 
specialized training promises. 



THOMPSON'S 
BARBER SHOP 

Or.rj,ns Place near Fla. Ave. 
iiair Cut As You Like It 

50 cents 
Hours: 11 to 8 
9 to 9 Saturdays 



III fill 1 1 II III 1 1 1 1 1 II II I II II I E 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ? " U 

LITTLE I 

9th St., South of G = 

Hearing aids for most seats! E 

First Run & Revivals jjj 
See Daily Papers for Programs ~ 



Organization Directory 

Associated Student 

Financial Department 

Pres Leonard Meyer, '44 

Vice-Pres Willis Ayers, '45 

Secy. . . . Donald Wilkinson, '45 

Treas Henry Krostoski, '45 

Asst. Treas. . . Frank Sladek, '46 

Dramatic Club 

Pres Paul Baldridge, '44 

Vice-Pres. . . Leander Moore, '44 

Secy Mervin Garretson, '47 

Treas Ralph White, '46 

Gallaudet College 

Athletic Association 

Pres Charles Pollock, '44 

1st V.-P. . . . Donald Padden, '45 

2nd V.-P. . Henry Krostoski, '45 

3rd V.-P. . Herman Johnson, '46 

Secy Earl Elkins, '46 

Treas. . . . Marvin Marshall, '47 

Asst. Treas. . . . Lyle Wiltse, '46 



Gallaudet College Women's 

Athletic Association 

Pres Julia Burg, '44 

Vice-Pres Celia Burg, '45 

Secy. Betty Jo Raines, '46 

Treas Earline Becker, '47 

Kappa Gamma Fraternity 
Grand Rajah. Bro. Baldridge, '44 

Kamoos Bro. Padden, '45 

Tahdheed Bro. Meyer, '44 

Mukhtar .... Bro. Krostoski, 45 

Literary Society 

Pres Ralph White, '46 

V.-Pres. . Warren Blackwell, '46 

Secy Mervin Garretson, '47 

Treas Marvin Marshall, '47 



Movie Club 

Pres Meyer Plotitsky, '44 

Vice-Pres. . Harold Steinman, '4 6 

Secy Byron Hunziker, '46 

Treas. .... Marvin Marshall, '47 

O. W. L. S. 

Pres. . . Caroline Tillinghast, '44 

Vice-Pres Agnes Carr, '45 

Secy Jean Smith, '46 

Treas Marjorie Case, '46 

Librarian . . . Frances Lupo, '44 



Photography Club 

Pres Bertt Lependorf, '44 

Secy-Treas. . Leonard Meyer, '44 
General Mgr. . W. Blackwell, 46 



Men's Reading Room Committee 

Chairman . Meyer Plotitsky, '44 

Secy.-Treas. . Jack Hensley, '45 

Thomas Berg, '44 

Willis Ayers, '45 

James Drake, '46 

Cecil Alms, '46 

Young Men's Social Club 

Pres Ralph White, '46 

Vice-Pres. . Marvin Marshall, '47 

Secy Mervin Garretson, '47 

Treas Thomas Fishier, '47 

Young Women's Christian Assn. 

Pres Frances Lupo, '44 

V.-P. . . . Clarhelen Wilkins, '45 

Secy Nadine Nichols, '46 

Treas Aleat'ha Barnes, '46 

Lit. Chnm. . . Arlene Stecker, '44 

Asst. Chmn. . . Betty Stark, '45 



MISTAKES 

When a plumber makes a mis- 
take, he charges double for it. 

When a lawyer makes a mis- 
take, it means more business. 

When a doctor makes a mis- 
take, he buries it. 

When a judge makes a mis- 
take, it becomes a law. 

When a preacher makes a mis- 
take, nobody knows the difference. 

But when an editor makes a 
mistake, good night! 

— Current Science 



Quality 
Since 

1865 



ART MUTH 

MATERIALS «. 6386 



Mrs. Geo. L. Sutton 

Mrs. L. Sutton Bailey 

ATlantic 1153 

PEOPLES 

FLOWER SHOP 

"Say It With Flowers" 

900 H Street, N. E. 



PAGE FOUh 



The Buff and Blue 



Friday, March 3, 1944 



NEWS OF THE ALUMNI 



!$} W infield S. Runde, '01 



The Birmingham (Alabama) 
News Age Herald employs several 
deaf linotypists, among them be- 
ing: Herman Harper, '08, Alton 
Bell, ex-'09, Sam Rittenberg, ex- 
'2 3, and Rush Letson, a former 
student. 

Football teams coached by 
former Gallaudet men locked 
horns on the Alabama School 
gridiron. The teams were Geor- 
gia School, coached by Olaf Tol- 
lefson, '37, and Alabama School, 
coached by Harry L. Baynes, '2 3. 
The Alabama team won 34 to 0. 
Previously the Georgian team 
held a clear record of victories. 
V — — 

We regret that we got the 
Grays mixed up in one of our 
items that appeared in the Buff 
and Blue. However, not knowing 
the Grays, one from the other, 
we accepted the correspondent's 
item and only dressed it up. Let 
us get it straight now — William 
Virgil Gray is the acknowledged 
excellent husband of the former 
Thelma Dyer, '32. Arlie Lucien 
Gray, '32, is the likewise excel- 
lent husband of the former Miss 
Leehy. The two Grays are not 
related — not at all, no, not by a 
long, long, shot! 

V 

We are afraid we may have 
overlooked the arrival of a 7 % 
pound son, May 8, at the home of 
the Greenmuns (Robert, '36 and 
Rosalind Redfearn, '41). For a 
time there were grave fears for 
Rosalind, known in Columbus 
Circles as one of the sweetest — 
but now far removed from the 
close proximity to the deep, dark 
shades, everything is akin to 
earthly heaven in the Greenmun 
home. That's our pleasant in- 
formation. 

V 

Zeta Chapter of the Kappa 
Gamma honored the 107th natal 
day of Edward Miner Gallaudet 
at a banquet in Berkeley, Calif., 
February 5. The scene of the hap- 
py gathering of the clan was the 
swank Women's City Club. Alpha 
W. Patterson, '14, was chairman 
or, more properly, master of the 
feast, and he did his stuff with 
the finesse of a Tallyrand. De- 
spite the absence of the drop that 
cheers, aqua pura from the snow- 
clad Sierras proved sufficient 
stimulus to turn on a flow of 
oratory the like of which had not 
been heard since Pearl Harbor! 
Unrationed Tom turkey was the 
piece de resistance on the menu. 
Dr. and Mrs. Elwood A. Steven- 
son were the guests of honor 
(N — '11-'12). Those present 
were: Lester G. Rosson, '02, and 
wife, Robert Clingenpeel, '40, 
and wife, John Galvan, '43, 
Norma Strickland, '42, A. W. 
Patterson, '14, and wife, L. B. 
Sorenson, '36, and wife, Emil S. 
Ladner, '35, Mary Blackinton 
Ladner, '36, Howard T. Hof- 
steater, '30, Ellen Parker Hof- 
steater, '28, Olaf Kvien, '33, and 
wife (an ex-'32), Louis Byouk, 
'2 9, and wife, Vernon S. Birck, 
'12, Ruth Knox Birck, '14, 
Robert Layne, '35, Helen Wilson 
Layne, ex-'35, Winfield S. Runde, 
'01, and Frances Norton Runde, 
'01. Michael Lapides, '13, of 
New Haven, Conn., sent a mes- 
sage of greetings. 

Those who could not be pre- 
sent were: B. B. Burnes, '26, L. 
M. Jacobs, '38, Andrew McCono, 
'33, Earl C. Norton, '35, W. P. 
Valiant, '20, George H. White- 
worth, '2 0, Robert L. Miller, an 
ex., and Robert Travis, '34. 
V 

The Frederick A. Moores ('15) 
have a young daughter, Betsy or 
Betty, who is the apple of their 
eye. She has an abiding faith in 
the large heartedness of Santa 
Claus, and at Christmas she had 
every reason to confirm her 
sweet childish belief. There is 
another Betty — Betty McFarlane, 
offspring of John H. and Florence 



Compliments 
of t\e 

Curb Cafe 

714 H. St., N. E. 



♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ 

Harper McFarlane ('07-'18). It 
is suggested that the two Bettys 
— -the one living in Columbus, 
Ohio, the other in Talladega, 
Ala., get in touch with each 
other via the mail route. Both 
Fred and John are pedagogues 
and editors of distinction. 
V 

Powell Wilson, '20, sticks to 
iiis trade — tonsorial artist — at 
Lowry Field, Denver. He used to 
cut hair and shave beards a t 
Camp Carson, Colorado Springs. 
He learned his trade at the Col- 
orado School. When he went to 
Jallaudet the Chesterfields among 
the student body soon found him 
out and Saturday was a time 
when the halls of the College re- 
sounded all day long with the 
clip-clip-snip-snip of Powell's keen 
edged cutlery. 

V 

Robert C. Hemstreet, '03, was 
rewarded by his fellow workers 
— t hat i s — his employers i n 
Cleveland for his 25 years' faith- 
ful service. The token of esteem 
and appreciation was a great and 
pleasant surprise — a $300 gold 
watch and many handshakes and 
pats on the back. While at Col- 
lege Bob was a studious student, 
quiet, determined, and yet he 
possessed the stamina that called 
for stout hearts to uphold the 
honor of the Buff and Blue on 
the often bloody football field — 
Garlic Field. Aye! Bob is one of 
those grads, one of those little 
known stokers below, who in the 
years to come emerge from the 
hatch, grimy but unsullied — an 
honor to their Alma Mater. 
-— V 

A letter from the Rev. Ar- 
nold Hill Payne, N-'99, Stans- 
field Rectory, Sudbury, Suffolk, 
England, conveys the sad in- 
formation that his wife passed 
away last April. Arnold himself 
has not been well for years 
though he still preaches. He said 
he gave up the work with the 
deaf long ago because he had no 
auto and his legs could not stand 
travelling around visiting the 
homes of the deaf. It hurt him 
to give up this work for which 
he had long prepared. Arnold 
took his B. A. at Jesus College, 
Oxford. It was a great day for 
the Gallaudet students when it 
was announced that Oxford was 
represented in the Normal De- 
partment of the College. The 
Britisher was quite p o p u 1 a r 
because he was a good mixer. 
V 

The Rev. Roberts C. Fletcher, 
'2 6, not only directs the mis- 
sionary work of his dioceses, but 
he also goes out of his way to 
assist the deaf in need of em- 
ployment. He is appreciated by 
his flock because they know by 
his words and actions that he is 
for the deaf "in and out of sea- 
son." Bob believes in the beauty 
of the sign language and he gets 
hearing churchmen to give their 
approval of it after they had wit- 
nessed services conducted in the 
only way understandable to the 
deaf. Why, Bob even converted 
the Bishop of Alabama, the 
Right Rev. C. C. J. Carpenter. 
And not only that, mind you, but 
also so interested the good bishop 
that he himself insisted that he 
be taught signs. In an address 
November 7 at St. Peters Church, 
Talladega, the deaf were sur- 
prised when the bishop addressed 
them in their own mode of com- 
munication. 

V 

Olaf Loren Tollefson, '37, and 
wife (Frances May, '40) have 
gone back to their first love, the 
Georgia School. They had been 
tempted to go to Florida where 
Olaf taught in the academic de- 
partment of the Florida State 
School. Like the Biblical prodi- 
gal son, Olaf and Frances were 



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Photo- Work 
651 H St., N. E. 



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N. A. D. OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENT 



We are pleased to announce that the Hon. Paul V. Mc- 
Nutt, Administrator of the Federal Security Agency, has ap- 
pointed Dr. Tom L. Anderson, President of the N. A. D., as a 
member of the National Rehabilitation Advisory Council to re- 
present the deaf of the United States. 

"There are many important problems which will affect 
plans for the expanded program on which we need advice 
from all groups concerned with welfare of our handicapped 
citizens," says Mr. McNutt in his letter to Dr. Anderson. "To 
have a group available for continuing advice and support, I 
have established the National Rehabilitation Advisory Council. 
I am writing to ask if you will accept membership on this 
Council. * * * We do not anticipate that this Council 
will meet frequently, and we will be as considerate as possible 
in the matter of calling its members to Washington for meet- 
ings. However, we do .need urgently to rely on your counsel 
in planning the program and on your support in the com- 
munity." 

Representatives from over twenty groups of physically 
handicapped citizens have been named to this Council. It is 
anticipated that their recommendations and advice will ma- 
terially affect the success of the program for physical restora- 
tion, vocational guidance, training, and placement in employ- 
ment, made possible by the 1943 Amendments to the Voca- 
tional Rehabilitation Act of 1920 expanding the Federal pro- 
gram of grants-in-aid to the States for services to the phy- 
sically handicapped. 

The N. A. D. backed the LaFollette-Barden Bill which 
became law last July (Public Law No. 113). We reasoned 
that it was better to work for the expansion of an existing 
service to which the deaf were eligible as proved in a number 
of States wherein Rehabilitation agents devoted their efforts 
exclusively to the deaf and the hard of hearing, than to strive 
to force an entire new set-up through a War Congress. We 
are now at the threshold of success. Patience is necessary yet 
a little while, until the various State programs, which have 
been at variance, can be perfected and set in motion. Ample 
Federal funds have been set aside for this service, and it 
remains only for the States to 'organize to take full advantage 
of their opportunity. 

That there is an awarenes by the State School authori- 
ties of the importance of this expanded service may be seen 
by the action of President Settles of the Convention of Ameri- 
can Instructors of the Deaf, who has appointed a committee to 
work with our N. A. D. Committee in surveying the possibili- 
ties of an effective working agreement with the Federal 
Office of Rehabilitation and the various State Divisions. This 
Committee, headed by Mr. Howard M. Quigley, Kansas, in- 
cludes Mr. John A. Gough, Oklahoma; Mr. Harry B. Brown, 
Pennsylvania; Dr. Elwood A. Stevenson, California; and Mr. 
Charles A. Bradford, New York. The N. A. D. Committee is 
Mr. Marcus L. Kenner, Chairman, New York; Mrs. Petra F. 
Howard, Minnesota; and Rev. A. G. Leisman, Wisconsin. 

Obviously, the presence of Dr. Anderson on the National 
Council will greatly facilitate matters, for we shall not only 
have an able representative but one well versed in the theory 
and practice of rehabilitation service as the program applies 
to the deaf. 

The Joint Committee will welcome suggestions and re- 
commendations for submission to the National Council. In 
the meantime, we bespeak the loyal support of all the deaf, 
and of their organizations. The National Fraternal Society of 
the Deaf, with its 10,000 members, has lost no time in en- 
dorsing Dr. Anderson as its representative on the National 
Council. State Associaions and other independent organiza- 
tions of the deaf should do likewise. 

Nothing is being asked of the deaf except understanding 
and cooperation. There are no "Chapters" and no "dues." 
Now that the War has made industry aware, on a large scale, 
of the abilities and skills of deaf workers, we should all act 
in concert to maintain the gains, and go forward. "United 
we stand, divided we fall." 

We presume, of course, that you have kept up your mem- 
bership in the National Association of the Deaf, which has 
been working for you without interruption since 18 80. 



MARCUS L. KENNER, 
Chairman 



February 16, 1944 



$ ■ 

received back with open arms. 
Both were rewarded with teach- 
ing positions. 

V 

C. E. Jones, ex-'12, principal of 
the Alabama School for Colored 
Deaf, is a Shriner — "Islam greets 
you — glad to meet you." To be- 
come a Mason, not to say a 
Shriner, is no easy matter. How 



C. E. managed to get by when 
the rigid requirement of posses- 




Compliments 
Glass of '47 



IIIIIIIIIE3IIIIIIIIIIIIE3IIIIIIIIHIIE3IIIIIIIIIIIIE3IIIIIIINIIIE3IIII IICJ IIIIIIIESIill!!!!: _ 



• • 



'cwueLi 




sion of all five senses never is 
let down, puzzles us. The Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows 
also requires hearing, but the 
Alumni Editor was initiated up to 
the 3rd degree over thirty years 
ago. It was however made easy 
through the employment of the 
manual alphabet, which the 
lodge accepted as good as oral 
because no writing was neces- 
sary. 

V 

James B. Beauchamp, '2 5, be- 
cause of the closing of the Ken- 
tucky School last fall, was forced 
to either fold his arms or find 
work. He finally decided to go 
to Louisville where his daughter 
could attend school and he could 
do repairing on some property he 
owns there. Now he is back in 
Danville teaching and editing the 
Standard. 

V 

The stork chose an appropriate 
date to visit the home of Clive 
D. Breedlove. '39, and wife — an 
ex-'42. The date? Listen! The lit- 
tle girl — Donaldine Frances — 
out of the somewhere into the 
here — gladdened the hearts o f 
her parents August 27. The wee 
mile arrived on her parents' sec- 
o n d wedding anniversary, the 
same hour they began the tradi- 
tional march to the altar. And in 
addition to these favorable dates, 
the baby came on her maternal 
grandfather's natal day. Now 
five months plus on this sphere, 
Donaldine boasts possession of 
three teeth and already is begin- 
ning to find out why she has two 
legs. Clive is a linotyper on an 
Indianapolis afternoon daily and 
has been there for three and half 
years. He's a steady. 

V 

Kenneth Huff, N-'40, was ex- 
cused from the draft because he 
is a teacher in the Kentucky 
School. This was a great relief 
to the school because his work 
is valued highly. Kenneth is the 
son of deaf parents, hence he 
understands the needs of the deaf 
students. When the Kentucky 
school was closed for repair work 
last fall he put in his time man- 
aging a florist's establishment. 
_ _v 

Charies B. Grow, N-'2 4, is the 
efficient vocational principal o f 
the Kentucky School. Last fall 
the stork called at his home and 
left a little fairy who will go 
through life as Linda Lee Grow; 
"A tiny feather 
From the wing of love. 
Dropped into the sacred lap 
Of motherhood." 
Aside from his professional 
duties, Charles is serving as Pres- 
ident of the Danville Kiwanis 
Club and he is also active in civic 
affairs. 



Alfred B. Marshall, '31, had 
done such efficient work as boys' 
supervisor and instructor of 
sloyd at the Kentucky School 
that the superintendent advanced 
him to the department of car- 
pentry and cabinet making. 
V 

Beta Chapter of the Kappa 
Gamma covering the area around 
Omaha and Council Bluffs re- 
cently held an election and all 
the officers were reelected. They 
are: Nathan Lahn, '2 5, President; 
T. Scott Cuscaden, ex-'17, Vice- 
President; J. J. Marty, '22, Secy- 
Treas. The Chapter has decider! 
to meet only once every two 
months for the duration. It was 
founded over 2 5 years ago and 
met regularly once a month. The 
members are: Eugene McConnell, 
'2 4, Auton J. Netusil, ex-'24, Os- 
car M. Treuke, ex-'24, Charles J. 
Falk, '25, Norman G. Scarvie, '27 
and the above officers. 

V 

James H. Galloway, N-'32, is 
the new superintendent of the 
Rochester, N. Y. School. He was 
formerly principal of the Louis 
iana School. The Normal Depart- 
ment of Gallaudet College has 
provided quite a few heads of 
state schools for the deaf. These 
men are versed in all methods 
of approach and they are sup- 
posed to be wedded to no single 
method. It is pleasing to note 
that these former Normal fellows, 
with possibly one or two excep- 
tions, believe in having on their 
faculty one or several well 
trained college educated deaf 
teachers. That attitude certainly 
is what is doing the proper thing 
by the deaf pupils who cannot 
possibly progress in a speech at- 
mosphere. Even in oral classes in 
the upper grades, it is well to 
have at least one deaf teacher 
where rotation of classes is the 
order. The deaf teacher con- 
ducts his teaching technique by 
wall slate writing and the manual 
alphabet. This is a great advan- 
tage to even orally taught pupils 
for reasons that are easily under- 
stood by liberal minded hearing 
teachers of the deaf. There is a 
place in every school for the deaf, 
for deaf teachers of proven abili- 
ty. The deaf pupils appreciate the 
contact because they see in the 
deaf teacher the inspiration that 
is so necessary to help them to 
find themselves. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



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R. .1. STEWART 
PARTY, APRIL 8 



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G.C.A.A. BANQUET 
APRIL 14 



Volume LI I, Number 10 



GALLAUDET COLLEGE, KENDALL GREEN, WASHINGTON, D. C 



Wednesday, March 22, 11)44 



Mrs. Siatter Speaks 
On Red Cross Drive 



Whereabouts of Red Cross 
Clubmobile Revealed 



A distinguished speaker in the 
person of Mrs. R. L. Siatter of 
North Dakota, a member of the 
American Red Cross, gave a talk 
on the activities of the Red Cross 
during the regular services Wed- 
nesday noon, March 8. Mrs. Siat- 
ter expressed her pleasure at be- 
ing in Washington to help with 
the War Fund Campaign, and 
also at being able to address an 
assemblage at Gallaudet College. 

Mrs. Siatter stated that for 
quite some time it had been the 
practice of the American Red 
Cross to conduct a drive for 
funds some time in March, and 
this year is no exception. Former- 
ly these funds were used only for 
the relief of poverty-stricken 
families, and also in case of 
disasters, but in these times of 
war a much larger sum is need- 
ed, because the Red Cross has 
taken up the added responsibil- 
ity of doing everything in their 
power to better the conditions 
of the members of our armed 
forces and their families. For 
this reason they have set their 
goal at $200,000,000 in the pre- 
sent campaign. Ninety percent of 
this sum is for the added war- 
time services and the remaining 
ten percent is for the usual ac- 
tivities. 

Mrs. Siatter went on to explain 
that such a seemingly enormous 
sum is in reality very small in 
proportion to the good which is 
done with the money. She cited 
examples from her contacts with 
men of the armed forces who 
showed how they regarded the 
American Red Cross. In addi- 
tion to helping improve the re- 
creational and morale-building 
facilities of our fighting men, the 
Red Cross saves many lives 
through the blood plasma 
obtained from donations. They 
also send food parcels to war 
Continued on page A, col. 5 
V 

Dr. Hall Lectures on 
"The Happy Heart" 

The topic "The Happy Heart" 
was chosen by Dr. Percival Hall 
for his impressive and soul-search- 
ing lecture in Chapel Hall, Sun- 
day evening, March 5. 

Dr. Hall began the lecture by 
describing the child who gets 
what he wants by crying for it. 
In this way some people think 
they can find happiness, but they 
very seldom do. The four main 
points for making a happy heart 
as expresed by Dr. Hall are; 
Faith, Wisdom, Affection, and 
Work. The foremost of these 
four is faith: faith in oneself and 
in one's friends. According to 
Dr. Hall, life is almost worthless 
without faith, because it requires 
faith to carry oneself bravely on- 
ward, and faith in friends in 
order to lead a happy social life. 
Next to faith comes affection, a 
quality which a person needs in 
order to urge himself toward 
higher standards. Without wis- 
dom, these two major personal 
qualities cannot be attained, 
therefore, Dr. Hall expressed the 
value of wisdom. In stating this, 
he explained that wisdom did not 
mean a widespread knowledge 
of everything on earth, but only 
meant applied knowledge in gen- 
eral which enables people to 
carry on their daily lives wisely 
and with self-reliance. No joys 
can be obtained to build a happy 
heart without work, therefore 
work must come before any mat- 
erial can be obtained to construct 
such hearts. 

Dr. Hall related a few short 
stories in parable form to express 
his points of view, and then 
closed his lecture with a short 
verse by John Vance Cheney: 

Who drives the horses to the 

sun 
Shall lord it but a day: 
Continued on page 3, col. 4 



Co-eds Answer 
Call of the Red Cross 



Polks who three years ago 
gave money to the "Victory 
Fund" of the National Associa- 
tion of the Deaf will take personal 
pleasure in reading this news. It 
is now known that at least one 
of the N. A. D. clubmobiles, 
bought with the Victory Fund 
money, is now in service over- 
seas. This fact is brought out in 
a letter published in the Frat for 
February- The writer is Wally 
Oldfather, a commissioned officer 
in the U. S. Air Corps in Italy. 
His mother is mentioned as Mrs. 
Oldfather, who very likely is 
Mrs. Elva Oldfather, an Iowan 
from Cedar Rapids residing in 
Wellington, Kansas, near Wichi- 
ta. The part of the letter quoted 
in the Frat follows: 

"Mother, your National Asso- 
ciation of the Deaf has contri- 
buted to the Red Cros and it 
bought Clubmobiles with tbe 
money. They are station wagons 
which two girls drive around 
with coffee and doughnuts for 
soldiers. The other day, one came 
here and on the door was printed 
"from the Deaf of the United 
States through N. A. D." I got 
a thrill out of seeing that and 
after rubbing off the mud, took 
a picture of the car. If it will 
pass the censor I'll send you a 
print. I thought you and your 
friends might like to know your 
car is here in Italy where it will 
do a lot of good spreading cheer 
and hot coffee to many tired 
soldiers and greeting thousands 
of pilots back from missions. 1 
know I speak for a couple of 
thousand soldiers — when I say to 
you and your Grand National As- 
sociation of the Deaf: 'Thanks so 
much.' — Iowa Hawkeye. 
V — 

K G Hails Vishnu 
Again This Year 

Hail the coming DAY OF DAYS! 
On Friday evening, February 25, 
eleven unrested candidates for ad- 
mission to the Kappa Gamma 
Fraternity were brought before 
the entrance of the studded doors 
of Shivland. The eleven neo- 
phytes are now undergoing the 
rigors of probation before the 
watchful eyes of the Terrible 
Four. 

Those now braving the wrath 
of the Terrible Four are: Thomas 
Berg, '44; Dewey Samples, '46; 
Jason Amnions, '47; Thomas 
Fishier, '47; Mervin Garretson, 
'47; Rudolph Hines, '47; Calton 
James, '47; Kenneth Lange, '47; 
Marvin Marshall, '47; Eugene 
Schick, '47; and Robert Stanley, 
'47. 

The unbeaten neophytes will 
be entertained at a banquet at 
Hotel Twenty-Four Hundred on 
the following night. 

Come, all ye Brethren! Let us 
gambol together! 

Banquet at Hotel 2400 

Again this year, the war sit- 
uation has caused quite a diffi- 
cult problem involving the pre- 
parations for the annual banquet 
in honor of the new members of 
the Kappa Gamma Fraternity. 
However, the Kappa Gamma has 
succeeded in making reservations 
at Hotel Twenty-Four Hundred 
on Saturday evening, March 25, 
at 7:30 p. m. 

The guest speaker for the even- 
ing will be Bro. Earl L. Rogerson, 
'41, who at present is printing 
instructor at the Virginia School 
for the Deaf at Staunton, Va. 
While in college Mr. Rogerson 
was very active in various college 
activities. He was President of 
the Dramatics Club for some time. 
He is a very impressive speaker, 
and therefore, there is promise of 
a good program at the banquet. 

In previous years the annual 
banquet has been held at the Gar- 
den House of the Dodge Hotel. 
Owing to lack of help, the Garden 
Continued on page S, col. 5 



For the nth time Fowler Hall 
co-eds have donated blood to the 
United States Army and Navy 
through the American Red Cross. 
Thirteen girls went in a group to 
the Blood Donor Center on Wed- 
nesday afternoon, March 1. 

Of the thirteen, four were re- 
jected. The nine who donated 
were as follows: Misses Orpha 
Thompson, Normal; Frances 
Lupo, Julia Burg, Caroline Til- 
iinghast, and Clarice Petrick, 
Seniors; Agnes Carr and Betty 
Stark, Juniors; Gertrude Slattery, 
Sophomore; and .Mary Frances 
Miller, Freshman. 

It is a fine thing for one to be 
able to render his country as 
valuable a service as this, and do 
it more than once. Here's hoping 
more students here will hearken 
to the call of the Red Cross! 
V — — 

Y.W.CA. Program Is 
World-Wide in Theme 



Dramatics Class Program Successful; "Pirates of 
Penzance" First of Its Kind Staged at Gallaudet 



®-- 



Comic Opera Is the Main 
Attraction of the Program 



Members of the Y.W.CA. pre- 
sented a Vesper Service in the 
Girls' Reading Room Friday eve- 
ning, March 3, at 7 o'clock. 

The program opened with a 
short prayer by Pauline Hamlin, 
P. C. Hester Parsons, '47, and 
Frances Parsons, P. C, told some 
of the interesting things about 
life in Tahiti, where they lived 
for several years. Malvine Fisch- 
er, '44, spoke on the highlights 
of her trip to Europe when she 
was eleven years old. The poem, 
"America For Me", by Henry Van 
Dyke, was beautifully signed by 
Marilyn Hughes, '4 6. The pro- 
gram closed with a prayer by Al- 
eatha Barnes, '46. 

The Y.W.CA. chairman, Ar- 
lene Stecker, '44, is to be com- 
plimented on the interesting pro- 
gram which she prepared. 
V 

Much Activity 
Among O.W.L.S. 

March as well as being the 
month when lions turn into lambs 
is the time of much secrecy and 
activity in different local organ- 
izations. 

The O. W. L. S. have decided 
to consider ten young women for 
admission to their sorority: Misses 
Earline Becker, Barbara Myer, 
Hester Parsons, Irene Quidas, Es- 
tella Wood, Freshmen; Gertrude 
Slattery, Nadine Nichols, Sopho- 
mores; Betty Stark, Junior; Julia 
Burg and June King, Seniors. 

The word "probation" is as in- 
teresting as it sounds, being de- 
rived from the Latin verb "pro- 
bare" meaning "to try" or 'to 
prove." Should the chosen ten 
prove to be capable of withstand- 
ing every test and measuring 
up to the standards of the 
O. W. L. S., they shall be initiated 
into the mystic organization. 

In the meantime, may good 
fortune and courage attend them! 

Banquet at Hotel Statler 

Hotel Statler will be the scene 
of the O. W. L. S. annual banquet 
on Saturday evening, March 25, 
at 7 p. m. 

Dean Elizabeth Peet, O. W. L. 
S. advisor, will welcome the new 
owlets to the "nest." The guest 
speaker will be Mrs. Alan Cram- 
mate, '35. Mrs. Ivan Curtis, '33, 
will render a poem. President 
Caroline Tillinghast, '44, will 
preside as toastmistress, and 
Carlie F. Todd, '44, as Senior 
speaker. Estella Wood, '47, will 
deliver the response prepared by 
Gertrude Slattery, '46. A mono- 
logue will be given, to be enacted 
by Frances Lupo, '44. 

The menu, despite wartime 
restrictions, will be as follows: 

Fruit Supreme, Celery Hearts, 
Olives, Cream of Tomato, Half 
Roast Chicken, New Peas, Dau- 
phine Potatoes, Mixed Green 
Salad, Baked Alaska, Demi-Tasse. 



The Dramatics Class, under 
the direction of Professor Fred- 
erick H. Hughes, presented a two- 
play program in Chapel Hall on 
Saturday evening, February 26, 
at 8 o'clock. An unusually large 
audience was present. 

First on the program was a 
one-act farce, 'The Genius," fea- 
turing Jack Hensley, '45, as Lin 
Ko Mei, whose main passion in 
life is painting, and Jean Smith, 
'46, as his wife, a money-mad 
woman. She can see no use in 
her husband's career until she 
learns that his paintings are 
worth $5,000 each if he dies, 
whereas while he lives they are 
worth but 50 cents each. In order 
to have the paintings bring in the 
desired money, his wife and his 
brother, Lin Ko Sung (Virgie 
Bourgeois, '44), make the "Gen- 
ius" feign death. Mr. Chia, an 
art dealer (James Drake, '46), 
offers to buy all of Lin Ko Mei's 
work. When success is at their 
door, Lin Ko Mei's pride causes 
him to give the plot away. In 
the end, however, Mr. Chia him- 
self proposes the very same plot, 
the play ending in an amusing 
climax. 

The second play, presented in 
the form of a comic opera, was 
"The Pirates of Penzance," the 
famous operetta by Gilbert and 
Sullivan. Its presentation was 
not without significance, for it 
was the first time a play of this 
kind was attempted on the Gal- 
laudet College stage. Its success 
carried its import further in that 
it broadened for the deaf the pos- 
sibilities as to the type of drama- 
tization. In spite of the lack of 
music, the rhythmic signing of 
the cast supplied the needed 
swing and sway. The costumes 
and scenes were colorful and in 
accordance to the requirements of 
pokes fun at the nobility and big- 
wigs of England during the reign 
of Queen Victoria. Ralph White, 
the script. 

Unique in its narrative struc- 
ture, "The Pirates of Penzance" 



'46, in the role of Frederic, a 
youth of noble birth, has been 
sworn into piracy when a child 
by his nurse (Virgie Bourgeois, 
'4 4) until his twenty-first birth- 
day. On the day of release from 
bondage Frederic declares that 
he will wreak vengeance on the 
pirates whom he has served for 
so many years. On the same day 
he falls in love with Mabel (Mar- 
ilyn Hughes, '46), the eldest of 
the three daughters (Jean Smith, 
'46; Carlie F. Todd, '44; and her- 
self) of the Major General, Stan- 
ley (Roy Sperry, '46). 

As Frederic prepares to carry 
out his vow, the Pirate King 
(Warren Blackwell, '46) appears 
with the nurse and declares that 
since Frederic is only 5 % years 
old because he was born on Febr- 
uary 29 in a leap year, he is still 
bound by contract to serve the 
Pirate King for a long time to 
come. 

When the pirates (Jack Hens- 
ley, '45; James Drake, '46; and 
Everett Shrout, '46) threaten to 
do away with the Major General, 
Stanley saves his own neck by 
declaring he is an orphan, know- 
ing that the pirates were them- 
selves orphans, and that they had 
a "soft spot" in their hearts for 
orphans. However, when the pi- 
rate band discovers that the Ma- 
jor General has not told the truth, 
they wait in ambush to kill him. 
At the critical moment three 
policemen (Frank Sladek. '46; 
Rudolph Hines, '47; and Law- 
rence Leitson, P. C ) appear on 
the scene and demand the surren- 
der of the company in the name 
of Queen Victoria. To everyone's 
surprise, the pirates surrender, 
and all ends happily. 

The success of the program 
was largely owing to the untiring 
efforts and interest of Professor 
Hughes and his class, and also 
to the cooperation of those who 
worked backstage. Credit should 
be given to the following pei*- 
sons who aided greatly in the 
production of the plays: Inter- 
preters — Prof, and M v s. Thomas 
K. Kline and Prof. William Mc 
Clure; Assistants — Julia Burg, 
Frances Lupo, Mary Sladek, '4 4; 



Stage Designer — James Drake, 
'46; Stage Assistants — Herman 
Johnson, and Frank Sladek, '46; 
Screen Designers for the "The 
Genius" — Betty Taylor, Abigail 
Yowell, Frances Ross, P. C, and 
Malvine Fischer, '44; Program 
Cover Designer — Julia Burg, '44; 
and Mimeographers — Freshman 
Class in Business Practice. 

The Hughes Treat Cast to 'Spread' 

Following their presentation of 
the two plays, the entire cast and 
assistants were the guests of 
Prof, and Mrs. Frederick Hughes 
at a party in their home. With 
the rewarded feeling of well-being 
which is the result of work well 
done, the group sauntered across 
the campus to the home of their 
instructor in dramatics. 

The parlor resembled a gay 
patchwork of bright colors as the 
students filed in, still wearing 
their costumes. Other guests were 
Prof, and Mrs. William McClure, 
Prof, and Mrs. Thomas K. Kline, 
and Dr. Powrie Doctor, who add- 
ed to the interest of the party. 
Refreshments, in the form of hot 
chocolate, fruit salad, and cakes, 
were served by the host and his 
charming wife. Much to the de- 
light of the company present, 
Mrs. Hughes had found time from 
her busy schedule to bake those 
h o m e y nut-breads and spicy 
cakes that college students dream 
about. Lin Ko Mei and his wife 
kept their character roles by eat- 
ing seated on the floor, while the 
others formed a circle, keeping 
up a steady conversation running 
from the "little moron" to frater- 
nity customs. 

One thing that the class point- 
ed out with interest was the in- 
terior scheme of the house, es- 
pecially the paintings done by 
Mrs. Hughes herself. To many, 
it was the first visit to the Hughes 
residence and, disregarding all 
rules of etiquette, they roamed 
at ease noting each interesting 
detail and commenting on it. 

The class in dramatics wishes 
to express its sincere gratitude to 
Prof, and Mrs. Hughes who made 
the evening a perfect one with 
their invitation. 



Krug Gives Formula 
For Success in Life 



Speaker at the Sunday evening 
Chapel Services February 2 7, was 
Prof. Walter J. Krug-, Dean of 
Men. Dean Krug chose as his 
topic, "For as a man thinketh in 
his heart, so is he," — Proverbs 
23:7. He began his talk by a 
quotation from Virgil, "Possunt 
quia posse videntur," and then 
explained how Virgil had ob- 
served the success of his fellow 
men and how these successes 
were the result of thinking, 
backed by doing. Mr. Krug then 
used famous historical figures to 
prove that a person may succeed 
in his endeavors if he will only 
have faith in ultimate success in 
the face of all obstacles. One 
instance was George Washington 
at Valley Forge. Although Wash- 
ington was challenged by forces 
far superior to his in number, 
equipment, training, and wealth, 
he showed great faith for what 
he felt was right in his heart, 
and this faith teamed with his 
great determination finally re- 
sulted in success for him and 
his men. The same can be said 
for Lincoln. His people were 
ill-fed, ill T housed, and were al- 
most always on the verge of de- 
feat, but Lincoln's faith in the 
fact that the Union should not 
be dissolved led to final victory 
for the Union forces. In every 
crisis we have found determined 
men with faith in themselves and 
in their fellow-men, and this de- 
termination and faith has never 



yet failed to lead to ultimate 
success. This is evident in the 
achievements of such men as 
Nimitz. Marshall, MacArthur, 
and Eisenhower, who have led 
our armed forces to repeated vic- 
tories through their faith in the 
cause they consider to be just. 

Dean Krug also explained how 
this faith can also lead to over- 
coming a handicap. If a person 
feels in his heart that he can 
overcome his handicap, and sets 
out to do this, the chances are 
that he will finally be successful 
in his attempts. Milton was 
blind, but through his faith and 
determination he managed to 
take up the responsibility of sup- 
porting a family of three. Bee- 
thoven was deaf to his own music, 
yet he managed to compose some 
of the world's greatest symphon- 
ies. Peoplethought the phonograph 
was impossible, but Edison felt 
in his heart that it was possible, 
and he set out to prove it. His 
faith in himself and his deter- 
mination finally brought him suc- 
cess. Professor Krug went on to 
explain that there are hundreds 
of such examples in the world, 
many of them from our own col- 
lege. He stated that, although 
these men rose to the heights 
with glory, we can all approach 
these same heights along a more 
humble way merely by having 
faith in ourselves and by deter- 
mination and hard work. Con- 
cluding his inspiring talk, Pro- 
fessor Krug emphasized again the 
importance of self-confidence ana 
determination. " 'Can't,' " he re- 
marked, "gets no one anyw here. 
j but 'can' leads to success." 



Alumnae Attend 
O.W.LS. Meeting 

A variety program was given 
by the O. W. L^ S. on the evening 
of March 4 before an un- 
usually large audience. The bad 
weather had not prevented fifteen 
alumnae O. W. L. S. members 
from attending the presentation 
by their younger sisters. 

First on the program was Ed- 
ward Rowland Sill's "A Baker's 
Duzzen Uv Wize Sawz," signed 
by Ruby Miller, '47. A gypsy 
legend, "The Fourth Nail," was 
related by Carlie Todd, '44. Tak- 
ing part in the pantomime contest 
that followed were Clarice Pet- 
rick, '44; Margaret Clack, '46; 
and Roberta Herrmann, '44. 
With her demonstration of a 
husky farmer driving a tractor 
over very rolling territory, Miss 
Clack was chosen winner of the 
contest by Dean Peet and several 
guest members who acted as 
judges. "The Basque Country," 
familiar to French students, was 
described by Julia Burg, '44. 
Westerners grinned broadly as 
Hester Parsons, '47, gave the 
heart-warming "Out Where the 
West Begins." Critic Malvine 
Fischer, '44, praised the pleasant 
variety in the program, which is 
a direct compliment to Chairman 
Wilkins. 

Following the program, Dean 
Peet commented on the fitting 
custom of theaters to present 
"The Star Spangled Banner" as a 
prologue on every program. She 
Continued on page 8, col. 2 



PAGE TWO 



The Buff and Blue 



Wednesday, .March 22. 1944 



The Buff and Blue 



Published once a month during October, De- 
cember, April and twice a month during Novem- 
ber, January, February, March and May. Entered 
at the Post Office at Washington as second-class 
mail matter. 

Subscription Price $2.00 per year 

(l'ayable in advance) 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Malvine Fischer, "44 

LITERARY EDITOR Bertt Lependorf. '4 4 

NEWS EDITOR Byron Hunziker, '46 

SPORTS EDITOR Lyle A. Wiltse, '46 

ASS'T SPORTS ED Clarhelen Wilkins, '45 

ALUMNI EDITOR Winfiald S. Runde, '01 

ASSOCIATES 

Robert Panara, '45 Earl Elkins, '46 

Christel Erdmann, '46 

REPORTERS and COLUMNISTS 

Caroline Tillinghast, '14 Carlie Todd, '44 
John Randolph, '45 Calvin George, '45 

Betty-Jo Raines, '44 Jean Smith, '46 

Ralph White, '46 Nadine Nichols, '46 

Earline Becker, '47 Thomas Fishier, '47 

Mervin Garretson, '4 7 

BUSINESS MANAGER Calv.n George, '4 5 

ASS'T BUSINESS MANAGER . Donald Padden, '4^ 
CIRCULATION MANAGER . Harold Steinman, '4 6 
ADVERTISING MANAGER . Charles Pollock, '44 

ASS'T ADV. MANAGERS . . Frank Sladek, '46 

Wayne Schlieff, P. C. 

PRINTERS 
Leonard J. Meyer, '44, FOREMAN 
William Bright-well, '46 Jason Amnions, '47 
Bertt Lependorf, '44 Wayne Furlong, '46 

Charles Pollock, '44 

PROOFREADER Eugene Schick, '47 



What'* iVlosuj. laltli tUe. £ic f n jdawcjucufe,? 

We believe that, for the same reason that 
Braille is taught to the blind, the sign language 
should be taught to the deaf. Especially should 
it be used when the deaf child can express himself 
in no other way. Peeople who believe in teach- 
ing speech and speech reading to all deaf child- 
ren in the hope of making them as nearly "nor- 
mal'' as possible make a grave mistake when 
hey insist on such a program for those deaf 
children who do not have the capacity for using 
these means of self-expression. 

The progress made in oral schools for the deaf 
has been remarkable, and it is with the deepe.s. 
gratitude that the deaf world looks upon those 
who have helped to make contact between this 
world and that of the hearing easier. Unfort- 
unately, however, not all deaf people benefit from 
the oral system. Often there have been person ; 
whose voices are so unpleasant to the normal ear 
that they are more or less ''outcasts'' in the 
hearing world. Yet these people insist on speak- 
ing because of their former training. There are 
also people who have sight so poor that it is too 
much of a strain for them to read the lips. Tin 
only solution, as we see it, to these problems is 
the use of the sign language ! 

The teacher should not allow lack of means 
of Keif -expression to interfere with the child's 
progress in school. The child's mind may be 
willing, but the flesh is unable. How much more 
in keeping with the aims of society and educa- 
tion it would be if she were not to carry out 
her ideals at the expense of the child, but if she 
were to seek out the easiest possible way through 
which she could open up a world of happiness 
and usefulness to the child! 

The sign language is no disgrace; in fact, it 
is an art in itself. It is almost first nature wi1 
the deaf, just as speech is with the normal per- 
son. The sign language is the deaf person's her- 
itage . . . let him keep it ! 

V 



III llllllllllllllliH 

As We See It | 

Jean Smith, '46 



. -.AMW 



ill.:: 




Did you ever, on your way 
to H Street to have your shoes 
repaired, or while trying to 
figure which ration stamps 
will permit you to buy tuna 
fish for your 'spread,' recall 
the features of those good old 
pre-war days? 

SACRIFICE IN WARTIME. 
Now that Spring Vacation is 
on its way, sacrifice, to us, 
means giving up our annual 
vacation at camp. For years, "Kamp Kahlert" 
and "Camp Roosevelt" have been on every tongue 
as Spring approaches and are afterwards tucked 
in the fold of memory with a sigh. What a won- 
derful relief the long-awaited vacation would be! 
This year, as last year, we will stay home and 
'rough it' on the campus. Says Tiny Schleiff, who 
was honorably discharged from the army, "I've 
had enough of camping for awhile." So when we 
yell for camp this year, let's remember how many 
soldiers would gladly trade places with us if it 
meant being home for awhile. 

SABOTAGE AT LARGE: Is there a fifth col- 
umnist in the crowd? Professor Hall, Jr., that man 
who glues things back together, acquires new white 
hairs while watching the college gradually col- 
lapse around him. Glue shortage? No, it's the 
chapel chairs now... those seats that you squirm 
in twice a week. The squirming only gives your 
pants a shine, but when you tip backwards on two 
legs, dangling your feet gleefully, you're an Axis- 
backer. That position wears the rubber taps to 
nothingness! (The chairs do have rubber taps 
on the ends of the legs to prevent the scraping 
sound.) The effect is the same as the continuous 
scuffling of your heels that wears them down thin 
in the back. Your jaunty posture doesn't worry 
Hall, Jr., but those taps can't be replaced, so have 
a heart! 

BUS ACCOMODATIONS NOW A THING OF 
THE PAST. Gone are the reserved bus trips to 
our basketball games, when we could linger in the 
lobby until the exact minute and find the bus right 
at our doorstep at the appointed time, ready to 
convey us to some gymnasium in comfort and 
style. Now we enter an already crowded street 
car or bus and arrive at our destination on a gasp 
and a prayer. When attending a social affair 
downtown in evening attire, it is necesary to take 
a taxi in order to arrive in good shape. Perhaps 
after the war, when chartered buses are again 
available, even the laziest co-ed will attend the 
basketball games just for the luxurious ride. 

Only in memory do we go on the annual sight- 
seeing tour of historical points in nearby states, 
eating lunch at some shady spot on our way and 
reserved dinners at a restaurant en route, with 
"Doc" as our sponsor, toast-master, and what 
have you. Likewise, we again visit Mount Ver- 
non, crossing the Potomac by ferry, and spend 
the day in a royal relapse into the picturesque 
past. 

These luxuries are indeed trivial, when compared 
with the sacrifices being made by mothers and 
their children the world over, but at times, one 
misses them as an accustomed, glamorous part 
of college life. 



r? 



The Hurdy Gurdy 

Nadine Nichols, '46 & John Randolph, '45 




My life is but a weaving 

Between my God and me. 
I can but choose the colors 

He weaveth steadily. 
Full oft He weaveth sorrow, 

And I, in foolish pride, 
Forget He sees the upper 

And I the under side. 

— Selected. 



Hunziker, in order to detect 
arsenic in the system of a 
dead man, would smell his 
breath. Imagination is the 
idea! 

Watson, craving a little ex- 
citement, took a tumble down 
the back steps of College Hall 
on, of all days, St. Valentine's 
Day. Her ankle suffered ... is 
Cupid's aim falling short? 

Added attractions on the 
campus, besides the lovely hints of spring, are the 
Tilly-Marshall twosome. Becker escorting Sperry 
up the walk (Leap Year, you know* j 

Eenie, meenie, Larry, Dewey. Having trouble, 
Hamlin? ... Chapin has determined to be a "lone 
wolf" until she's received her education. Nothing 
can be guaranteed after that. 

And then there was Depew who thought the 
candidates for the Kappa Gamma were on prohibi- 
tion... And thinking of College Hall recalls to 
memory a day not long ago when one of the boys 
sugested they elect a Pied Piper. Mortensen had 
been finding mice (with four legs) in the build- 
ing. 

Schmidt's humiliated! Upon getting on a street 
car, with Cussy walking in front of him and run- 
ning to grab a seat at the extreme back, he handed 
the driver one. . .just one. . .transfer. The irrit- 
ated conductor started yelling for another. With 
ears burning, Burton walked 'way back, grabbed 
the transfer the innocently smiling Cussy handed 
him, and then walked back to the driver. And 
someone said women were the most considerate 
beings on earth! 




With everything in College 
Hall dragged down to a virtual 
standstill, no semblance of 
life whatsoever can be seen. 
But lo! Much feverish acti- 
vity can be expected of the 
phlegmatic College Hallites as 
the second term nears the end 
of its course. In particular — 
cramming for final examina- 
tions will be the order of the 
day. College students do so 
little in so much time and then so much in so 
short an interlude before the grand finale — What 
folly! 

Plotitsky let this malpropis slip in the bac- 
teriology class. He was proposing to fertilize 
bacteria when he really meant to sterilize them. . . 
Moore, the man of a thousand faces, and monkey 
face imitator par excellence, recently tried his art 
on a monkey at the zoo. He got unexpected results, 
the monkey returning the compliment with 
interest. . .Fishier sporting his "Esquire" not 
only on his signature — but also in large glaring 
letters on his back as a part of his probation test 
. . . Meyer is elated over his latest camera which 
will help to build up his coming family album . . . 
Steinman went home over the week-end sometime 
ago — not to mama — but to his femme . . . Smith 
looked so cute as a Chink in that last play that 
yours truly wonders why she wasn't born one . . . 
Amnions, always quiet, now feels at home — he's 
on probation. . .Witczak has a sixth sense — there 
is no sign of the other five...Rippe quit work, 
because he was afraid he would miss his debts. . . 
Panara has been considering going back to normal 
after an abnormally long time of angelic behavior 
— probably due to spring fever. 

liyiPiiUIIIIIIIIIIIilllllilllliillllilllllllllW 

I i 

I Reader's Dri-Jest j 

Caroline Tillinghast, '44 

lUli^nlll.iJillillllilllLlllllJlLilllii.liLhlJIhjII; 1 ,;!,,!!!^,!!!, ,,;,,. Illliliillllilllillllllllllllllilllllllllplf 

Take It or Leave It 

Judge: Have you ever 
worked? 

Hobo: Oh, now and then. 
Judge: Did you make any 
money? 
Hobo: 
Judge: 
Hobo: 
Judge: 
Hobo: 
Judge: 
Hobo: 
Judge: 




Yes and no. 

What did you do? 
Oh, this and that. 
Where? 

Oh, here and there. 
Put him in the cooler. 
Hey, when do I get out? 
Sooner or later. 

AO A 




Riddy: Do you hyphenate headache? 

Hogan: Not unless it is a splitting headache. 

ADA 

Flash From Germany 

German Announcer: Last night 500 Allied 
bombers attacked Germany. German planes 
fought back, causing heavy losses in Allied air- 
craft. One of our cities is missing. 

AoA 
Ruthless 
Ruth rode on my motorcar 
On the seat just back of me, 
I took a bump at eighty-five, 
And rode on ruthlessly. 
Junior Scholastic 

AOA 
Jasper: Have you ever studied a blotter? 
Casper: Of course not, why? 
Jasper: Very absorbing subject. 

AOA 
B. and B. contributor: Has the joke editor got 
my joke yet? 

Mally: No, but she is trying hard. 

AOA 
Emo: What do you think would go well with 
my new purple and green socks? 
Betty: Hip boots. 

AOA 

Fran: Tonight at our Senior buffet supper we 
had a dish the cook used her head in 
making. Can you guess what it was? 

Ralph: It must have been noodle soup. 

AoA 
Estella: (during lesson on creation) But my 

father says we were apes. 
Prof. J. Hall: We can't talk about your family 
in class. 

AoA 
My Bonnie bent over the gas tank, 
The height of its contents to see: 
She lighted a match to assist her, 
Oh, bring back my Bonnie to me. 

AoA 

And then there was an old gentleman at a wed- 
ding who asked a splendidly attired Negro, "Par- 
don me, suh, is you de groom?" 

"No, suh," came the gloomy reply, "Ah was 
eliminated in the semi-finals." 

AoA 
Senior: What makes you so foolish? 
Preparat: I used to sleep under a crazy quilt. 

AoA 
Perhaps the most curious instance of absence 
of mind is that recorded of a professor who after 
taking his bath one morning dried himself with a 
newspaper and sat down to read his towel. 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiii'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiM 

I i 

| Campus Chatter ] 

I Betty-Jo Raines, '46 & Ralph White, '46 | 

^ : ; ;i, i ;.■ ;.i :.;- 'iii!:! ,:..... i-- :. : i ,;i .:._,,:.:,:.. i ; ■ , . : . . 1 

Spring, like a good many other things, is just 
around the corner. Soon the Campus will be a 
velvety green and the couples will be strolling 
two by two and adorning the Chapel steps once 
again. 

Old friends and faces are 
always welcome on the 
campus, especially tall, hand- 
some Navy men with tags such 
as "Blair Smith" on them. 
Prof. Frank B. Smith's son, 
known affectionately among 
the students as "Blair," paid 
us a visit on Tuesday, March 
7th. 

Getting to be a familiar 
red-head these days is Frank 
Sullivan, '41, who came to Washington the week- 
end of March 3 with his undefeated wrestling boys 
of West Virginia who held their own against St. 
Albans of D. C. 

J. B. McDaniel is back on the campus after hav- 
ing been ill for so long. We have all missed him, 
and are glad to have him among us once more. 

Alfred Parker, now a Corporal, came a-visiting 
us and took in our Saturday evening social with 
us. Hef had been home on furlough, and came 
to see us before being transferred to Georgia. 

Mr. W. P. Hughes, former business manager of 
the College, was a campus visitor Thursday, 
March 9. Mr. Hughes has been doing government 
work in Brazil for the past two years. He has 
came back to the states in order to join the armed 
forces. 

Mrs. Howard Fisher and Dr. Percival Hall gave 
a reception at their home Sunday, March 12, for 
Lieut. (JG) and Mrs. N. F. Walker who were re- 
cently married in Boston. Lieut. Walker was grad- 
uated from the Normal Department in 19 36, and 
was former Principal of the South Dakota School 
for the Deaf and former teacher in the New Jersey 
School for the Deaf. His father was former Super- 
intendent of the South Carolina School for the 
Deaf, of which his brother is at present Superin- 
tendent. Lieut. Walker is at present on duty in the 
Washington Navy Yard. 

Mrs. William J. McClure and family (minus 
hubby) are visiting in Missouri for a month. 
Mary Hughes' radiant face has been greatly 
missed in College Hall. 

Miss Annie V. Craig is 
visiting at her home in Stan- 
ford, Ky. She is now convale- 
scing from an illness. We hope 
to see her around soon. 

Eugene Schick, '47, is back 
on the campus after an opera- 
tion for appendicitis. He is do- 
ing very nicely. His recovery 
was very rapid; he had to re- 
main in the hospital only two 
days after the operation. 




The Poet's Pack 

Contributions Made by the Student Body 



DRESS REHEARSAL 

Softly swirling, aimlessly twirling, 
Gliding, sliding, floating like down, 

Piling, clinging, offward winging, 

Giving bare Nature a silver-white crown. 

Windward swaying, downward playing, 
Silently singing a wondrous song, 

Tossing, flying, drifting, then dying 
As one; together, thty all go along. 



-Carlie F. Todd, '44 



-V- 



TERM'S END 
(After Rudyard Kipling) 

When the fac's last exam is given 

And our minds are twisted and dried, 
When the oldest Senior has fainted 

And the youngest Prep has died, 
We shall rest, and faith, we shall need it. . 

Lie down for an aeon or two 
'Til the teachers of all good students 

Shall give us more work to do. 

And those who were smart shall be happy, 

They shall sit in a golden chair, 
They shall read all the drug store comics 

While the faculty tear their hair. 
Only real saints would study right on . . . 

But out of our graces they fall; 
They could work for an age at a sitting 

And never be tired at all. 

Tho' only the faculty grade us 

We fail or pass all the same, 
For some of us work for money, 

And few of us work for fame; 
But each for the joy of living 

And each in his own sweet way 
Shall now trot down to the drug store 

To live his own way for a day. 

— C. Tillinghast, '44 & C. Todd, '44 



Wednesday, March 22, 1944 



The Buff and Blue 



PAGE THREE 



^IlllllllllllllillllllllllllllilllllllilllllllllilllllllllllllilllllJlillliiilllJIJfillUil;, 

SPORT SLANTS 

r= by Lyle Wiltse 



The 1943-44 basketball season is definitely over for the Gallaudet 
varsity men with the unsuccessful battle against the American Uni- 
versity Eagles as the finishing stanza to a long series of defeats 
broken only by an occasional win. The season record on the whole, 
was certainly nothing to brag about. In fact, it was one of the worst 
the writer has seen in his few years of intimate contact with sport- 
ing activities on Kendall Green. Being the defending champion, Gal- 
laudet was pitted on the opening day of the conference against the 
Eagles on somewhat equal ground. Chances for a win that night 
were hoptful, but, as usual, the team failed to click. They lacked 
form and close cooperation. The little spark that should eventually 
be whipped into a blaze of high power playing sputtered and went 
out. Both teams displayed poor shooting ability on both far and 
near tosses with little success on rebounds. Thus the basketball 
crown has passed on to newer hands, this time to the Mount St. 
Mary's College Greyhounds to win the laurels by a one-point margin. 
Incidentally, this was the same team who snatched the Cross Coun- 
try crown from our lads in November. The Catholic University 
players, who were the up-and-coming favorites had been eliminated 
the previous night by the determined Loyola hoopsters who were 
out for blood. However, C. U.'s basketball duds will not go under 
moth balls for some time yet, the team having been chosen as a 
participiant in the National Collegiate Basketball tourney to be held 
in Madison Square Garden in New York, March 24, 2 5. The Card- 
inals have built up an enviable record of seventeen victories out of 
twenty-two games. Loyola and Mount St. Mary's played a nip and 
tuck game in the finals, roaring up to a 38-39 count a bare two 
minutes before the finishing gun until "Wish" Galvin, a Mount St. 
Mary guard, dropped a shot that brought the final score up to 39-40. 
Galvin was a former Loyola man who is now a Navy trainee under 
the V-12 program enrolled at Mount St. Mary's. Fate had it that 
he should make the winning toss that put his old team mates to de- 
feat. It's an odd world. That Gallaudet did not make any headway 
whatsoever in the tournament did not come as much of a surprise 
since the amount of shellacking the Blues have taken prophecied 
well enough that they would sell short. The season has been a dis- 
appointment. Praise is deserving, however, for the excellent sport- 
manship displayed and the grit to carry on despite all setbacks. 
Here's to better luck next season, gentlemen. 

The intramurals came off to a rip-roaring start Wednesday after- 
noon, March 8, when the Junior ball pushers squelched the Prepara- 
tory five by a whisker in a whirlwind game that approached tornadic 
proportions as, in the first half, the scoreboard figured 16-16. Big 
dynamic Daniel Van Cott, sweating it out for the Juniors, was the 
center of the show, tearing across the court and simultaneously bel- 
lowing like a hippopotamus with the seven years' itch with little 
or no regard for any unfortunate who might be in the path of his 
terrific onslaught. As a result, he marked up three personal fouls 
to his credit to which he indignantly retorted, "I was not violent." 
Football still waxing heavy on your mind, eh, Dan? Bold knight, 
thou were indeed an impressive spectacle! Thus, with only five men 
on their team and Van Cott nearly ripe for the bench via the afore- 
said personal foul limit, a more cool and calculating brand of ball 
came into the making and the Juniors scooted through on top 27-26. 
This was an excellent opener for the intramurals, but if the young 
galants do not acquire a bit more humane aspect, Gallaudet's glam- 
orous Juliets are going to have to put up with cracked craniums 
and split kissers indefinitely. 



The unspoken word is your 
slave; the spoken word is your 
master. 

V 

Everything that is really great 
and inspiring is created by indi- 
viduals who labor in freedom. 

— Albert Einstein. 



Jack's Meat Market 

922 7th St., N. E. 

Fancy Groceries, Fruit And 

Vegetables 

Beer and Wine 

J. Greenstein, Prop. 



ALUMNAE O.W.L.S. 

Continued from page 1 



expressed her desire that every 
girl be able to deliver our nation- 
al anthem easily, with feeling, 
and without any distraction of 
movement or speech, because it 
has a code of its own that manes 
the singing a solemn occasion. 

Afterwards, the alumnae 
O. W. L. S. were the guests of 
Dean Peet at a bridge party. 
V 

Windy folk generally live 
stormy lives. 



CASSON STUDIO 



Photographers of the 1943 Buff and Blue 



1305 Conn. Avenue, N. W. 



DEcatur 1833 



£2lll!llililiin!IIIIIIIIIIIC2llllllllllll[3I!llilli;ili[3l!ll!IIIIIIIC]IIIIIIIIIIIIC3llll!llil!!l[3!ili 



1 GALLAUDET 



PHARMACYI 



I Phone Atlantic 8888 

| 1000 Flordia Ave., N. E. - Washington, D. C. 

i , l:Hnilllil[3IIIIIIIIIIIIC3IIIIIIIIIIIIC]ll!lllllllllC]IIIIIIIIIIIIC3IIIIIIIIIIIIC3llllllllllilE2i:i!i!ilimp 



Stampeding Herd 
Thunders to Victory 



The thundering Blue Bisons 
fought through the stiff dei'ensive 
set-up offered by the Delaware 
University quint to win their last 
home game of the season with a 
score of 47 to 42. The game took 
place on the Roosevelt High 
School court Friday evening, Feb- 
ruary 2 5, before one of the largest 
congregations of spectators ever 
to turn out to see the team in 
action. 

This large attendance was prob- 
ably due to the fact that the pre- 
liminary game was a contest be- 
tween two independent amateur 
leagues — the D. C. Silents and a 
Baltimore Silent team. In this 
game the D. C. Silents floundered 
their opponents winning by a 
wide margin. 

As the Bisons went into a hud- 
dle with Coach Sullivan before the 
game began, they were given a 
last minute pep talk, then they 
all clasped hands before going on 
the floor. The Delaware basket- 
eers had defeated the Blues in a 
previous encounter but this fact 
served only to rally their individ- 
ual spirits to a comon cause, .to 
defeat their opponents, thus re- 
sulting" in full cooperation and 
unique teamwork. 

The first quarter raged on with 
the Bisons snorting convulsively 
at every effort of their opponent? 
to break through their defenses. 
When on the offensive, the Blues 
worked cautiously making sure 
that their efforts should tally 
them something. At the end of 
the first quarter the Blues were 
barely ahead of the Delaware 
team, the score standing 10-9. 

The second and third quarters 
were a virtual basket-for-basket 
contest while the wild clamor for 
scores found the Bisons running 
neck and neck with the tough- 
and-ready Delaware quint. The 
end of the third quarter resulted 
in a slight teeter in Delaware's 
favor by a one point margin, 34- 
33. 

The Blues were destined to 
suffer a great handicap during 
the final quarter when Captain 
Baldridge, scoring ace of the 
game, was benched right after 
the final quarter began. Then, 
later on, approximately three 
minutes before the game ended, 
Padden was benched also. Never- 
theless, the potential second 
stringers mustered their force of 
unexperienced lads and led the 
Bisons onward to victory with the 
aid of Massey who saved the dav 
for the Bisons by scoring decisive 
baskets during the final minutes. 
All fans stood taut with emotion 
as Massey struck down the floor 
to place a field goal into the 
basket just before the gun went 
off. The gun roared out. and 
with it came the din of the fran- 
tic, happy fans as they acknow- 
ledged the victory. 

Summary: 

Gallaudet 

Baldridge 

Stanley 

Holcomb 

Mortensen 

Schleiff 

Witczak 

Padden 

Massey 

Fishier 



Five Mermaids 
Become Life-Savers 

The course in life-saving under 
the direction of Mrs. Kenneth 
Temple has been completed, with 
the assistance of Julia Burg, '44, 
and Frances Lupo, '44, who have 
passed the Red Cross senior life- 
saving tests. 

The class met four times a week 
for two months, beginning Jan- 
uary 10, and continuing until 
March 9, when the final water 
tests were given. In addition to 
the girls were required to pass a 
long written test. 

The following girls have suc- 
cessfully completed the course 
and will receive Red Cross life- 
saving certificates and badges: 
Agnes Minor, Hester Parsons, 
and Norma Bushey, '47; and 
Frances Parsons and Betty Tay- 
lor, P. C. 

1 The Iron Horse' 
Proves Popular 

As the second term neared its 
end, the Movie Club presented 
their final movie of the term in 
Chapel Hall on Saturday evening, 
March 4. A large number of out- 
siders came to see the show. 

Due to the length of the fea- 
ture presentation, no accompany- 
ing short subjects were -shown. 
The feature, "The Iron Horse," 
starring George O'Brien, depicted 
the construction of the Union 
Pacific railroad. Fighting Irish- 
men, stampeding cattle, and 
blood-thirsty Indians all did their 
part to make the movie both ex- 
citing and humorous. The movie 
had quite a bit of historical 
significance since the locomotives 
used in the final scene were the 
original ones. Also, th3 picture 
showed a striking contrast, 
between the transportario-i of 
those times and that of the pre- 
sent age. 

This program marked the ter- 
mination of the Movie Club'.? acti- 
vities for the second term. An 
impressive program of interest- 
ing features and short subjects is 
being planned for the thirl ter.n. 
V 

"THE HAPPY HEART 

Continued from page 1 



MRS. SLATTER SPEAKS 

Continued from page 1 



prisoners all over the world. These 
parcels contain eneough food to 
keep the prisoners in good health 
and at the same time to build up 
their morale by giving hem some- 
thing from home to look forward 
to. If all these food parcels 
were added up, there would be 
enough of them to supply almost 
every person in New York Cit> 
with one parcel. Mrs. Slatter 
also stressed the fact that tue 
American Red Cross never ask:, 
"who, why, what, or how," but 
is always there to lend a help 
ing hand. It does not make any 
racial or religious discrimina- 
tions. "The American Red Cross," 
she stated, "is you and your ser- 
vices." Ending her lecture, she 
remarked that in all of her ex- 
periences with people from the 
war zones and from the home 
front, she never once heard any- 
thing except words or praise anf 
thanks to the Rea Cross. 

The speaker urged that every 
American do his part, both phy- 
sically and financially, to help the 
work it has set out to do. 
V 

K G HAILS VISHNU 

Continued from page 1 

House was closed last year. The 
Kappa Gamma Fraternity was 
forced to accept reservations at 
any other hotel, in order to keep 
the banquet date. Hotel Twenty- 
Four Hundred provides a spacious 
dining room with excellent menus. 
It is hoped that these arrange- 
ments will be satisfactory to all 
attending. 

V 

Honor Roll for 
The Second Term 



Organization Directory 

Associated Student 

Financial Department 

Pres Leonard Meyer, '44 

Vice-Pres Willis Ayers, '45 

Secy. . . . Donald Wilkinson, '45 

Treas Henry Krostoski, '45 

Asst. Treas. . . Frank Sladek, '46 

Dramatic Club 

PreS Paul Baldridge, '44 

Vice-Pres. . . Leandcr Moore, '44 

Secy Mervin Garretson, '47 

Treas Ralph White, '46 

Gallaudet College 

Athletic Association 

Pres Charles Pollock, '44 

1st V.-P. . . . Donald Padden, '45 

2nd V.-P. . Henry Krostoski, '4 5 

3rd V.-P. . Herman Johnson, '46 

Secy Earl Elkins, '46 

Treas. . . . Marvin Marshall, '47 

Asst. Treas. . . . Lyle Wiltse, '46 



Better the lowly deed were 

done, 
And kept the humble way. 

The rust will find the sword 

of fame, 
The dust will hide the crown; 
Ay, none shall nail so high his 

name 
Time will not tear it down. 

The happiest heart that ever 
beat 

Was in some quiet breast 

That found the common day- 
light sweet, 

And left to heaven the rest. 



FG 


FT 


p 


8 


2 


18 











5 


3 


11 











2 





4 











2 





4 


4 


1 


9 





1 


1 



Totals 



21 



47 



Delaware University FG FT P 

Duncan 4 19 

Pruciho 

Berman 2 4 

Bowlus 6 4 16 

Sawihski 2 2 

Brown 10 2 

Zink 6 6 

Finnegan 113 



With sighs of relief, the Gal- 
laudet students bade farewell to 
the second term and prepared to 
begin the next step toward their 
degrees. The Honor Roll, al- 
though shorter than usual, was 
still large enough to support the 
theory that the Gallaudet stu- 
dents are still in there plugging 
away for high honors. Those who 
earned a place on the Honor 
Roll for the second term are 
listed below: 

Seniors : 

Malvine Fischer, Frances Lupo, 
Leander More, Meyer Plotitsky, 
Caroline Tillinghast, and Carlie 
Todd. 

Juniors : 

Donald Padden, Clarhelen Wil- 
kins, and Donald Wilkinson. 

Sophomore: 

Dewey Samples. 

Freshmen: 

Norma Bushey and Keith 
Lange. 

Preps : 

Lawrence Leitson, Wilbur 
Ruge, and Audrey Watson. 
V 

ALUMNI NEWS 

Continued from Page 4 



Totals 



14 14 42 



SHOP NEAR BY 



Gaffins 



Men's and Boys' Wear 



Dress and Sports Wear 



Work Clothing 



925 H Street, N. E. 



Phone TRindad 8833 



The late lamented Victor R. 
Spence, '03, left a rich legacy to 
the Minnesota Association of the 
Deaf in the form of a fifty-seven 
page booklet containing the names 
and addresses of all the living 
graduates and former pupils of 
the Minnesota School dating back 
to 1863. The Companion says 



Gallaudet College Women's 

Athletic Association 

Pres Julia Burg, '44 

Vice-Pres Celia Burg, '45 

Secy. Betty Jo Raines, '46 

Treas Earline Becker, '47 

Kappa Gamma Fraternity 

Grand Rajah. Bro. Baldridge, '44 

Kamoos Bro. Padden, '45 

Tahdheed Bro. Meyer, '44 

Mukhtar .... Bro. Krostoski, 45 

Literary Society 

Pres Ralph White, '46 

V.-Pres. . Warren Blackwell, '46 

Secy Mervin Garretson, '47 

Treas Marvin Marshall, '47 

Movie Club 

Pres Meyer Plotitsky, '44 

Vice-Pres. . Harold Steinman, '4 6 

Secy Byron Hunziker, '46 

Treas. .... Marvin Marshall, '47 

O. W. L. S. 

Pres. . . Caroline Tillinghast, '44 

Vice-Pres Agnes Carr, '45 

Secy Jean Smith, '46 

Treas Marjorie Case, '46 

Librarian . . . Frances Lupo, '44 

Photography Club 

Pres Bertt Lependorf, '44 

Secy-Treas. . Leonard Meyer, '44 
General Mgr. . W. Blackwell, 46 

Men's Reading Room Committee 

Chairman . Meyer Plotitsky, '44 
Secy.-Treas. . Jack Hensley, '45 

Thomas Berg, '44 

Willis Ayers, '45 

James Drake, '46 

Cecil Alms, '46 

Young Men's Social Club 

Pres Ralph White, '46 

Vice-Pres. . Marvin Marshall, '47 

Secy Mervin Garretson, '47 

Treas Thomas Fishier, '47 

Young Women's Christian Assn. 

Pres Frances Lupo, '44 

V.-P. . . . Clarhelen Wilkins, '45 

Secy Nadine Nichols, '46 

Treas Aleat'ha Barnes, '46 

Lit. Chnra. . . Arlene Stecker, '44 
Asst. Chmn. . . Betty Stark, '45 



THOMPSON'S 
BARBER SHOP 

Or. fins Place near Fla. Ave. 
Hair Cut As You Like It 

50 cents 
Hours: 11 to 8 
9 to 9 Saturdays 



iimimiiimiiimiiiiimiiitiiiiiiimr u 

LITTLE I 

9th St., South otf G 5 

Hearing aids for most seats! E 

First Run & Revivals s ; 
See Daily Papers for Programs^ 



that the good natured, patient Vic 
spent many hours compiling the 
long list, 

V 

Ruth Knox Birck, '14, is Dean 
of Girls at the California School. 
Not long ago she was inducted as 
a full fledged member of the Ber- 
keley Women's Club. The club 
house is a swank modern building 
built of concrete and steel and 
several s'tories high. It contains 
living quarters, cuisine, card 
rooms, lecture halls, dining 
rooms, swimming pool, etc. 



Quality 
Since 
1865 



ART MUTH 

MATERIALS *m 



Mrs. Geo. L. Sutton 

Mrs. L. Sutton Bailey 

ATlantic 115 3 

PEOPLES 

FLOWER SHOP 

"Say It With Flowers" 

900 H Street, N. E. 



PAGE FOU'it 



The Buff and Blue 



Wednesday, March 22, 1944 



NEWS OF THE ALUMNI 



Uy \\ infield S. Jtuiitle, '01 



-» ♦ ■» ^ 



William H. Grow, '27, of St. 
x\ugustine, Fla., was in Danville, 
Ky., all summer at the home of 
his parents. His wife at the same 
time journeyed to Denver, Colo., 
where she visited her parents. 
The Grows own a lovely home 
in Florida. 

V 

Mildred Albert, '41, formerly 
of the Alabama School, now li- 
brarian at the Michigan School, 
is hailed as a very enterprising 
and conscientious curator. She 
knows and understands the read- 
ing ability of all ages and her 
selections and recommendations 
keep the pupils interested in read- 
ing. Mildred evidently realizes 
that in order to acquire a good 
command of language, the prime 
essential of all deaf pupils is to 
get them to read and read and 
yet read. That is the right cue. 
Where there is real interest in 
reading, good language usage is 
Dound to follow. 

V 

Marie Seebach, '42, left the 
Staunton, Virginia, School and 
is now on the faculty of the Flint 
School where she teaches ad- 
vanced mathematics in the high 
classes and also has charge of 
physical education for the girls. 
V 

William Allen Tilley, a former 
student of the eighties, passed 
away in Tiburon, Calif., on Feb- 
ruary 21. He was the husband 
of the former Annabelle Powers 
(Kerney), widow of Charles Ker- 
ney, '85. After leaving College 
Tilley became a railway mail 
clerk on the "Owl" running be- 
tween San Francisco and Los 
Angeles. He secured a patent on 
a device that enabled a fast-mov- 
ing train to collect a mail bag, 
suspended on a post near the 
tracks, and deposit it in the mail 
car. It is said that this patent 
brought him some income. After 
his marriage his wealthy wife 
purchased a ten-acre villa on San 
Francisco Bay. The place was 
improved at great expense. 
Among the improvements was a 
high stone and cement wall along 
the bay shore. Above this was a 
rampart from which waved the 
Stars and Stripes. The house was 
built close up to the hill. The 
living room afforded a wide 
sweep of the bay and passing 
craft. Here the Tilleys enter- 
tained lavishly both deaf and 
hearing friends. Often they 
staged large picnics on the 
grounds. At one time they kept a 
Japanese cook and an Italian gar- 
dener. The grounds contained 
many rare plants. The imposing 
iron gates, which guarded the 
entrance, came from the palatial 
home of a San Franciscan whose 
place was destroyed in the great 
fire and earthquake of 1906. 
V 

Louis B. Sorenson, '36, is now 
living in Oakland, Cal. Not long 
ago he took unto himself for bet- 
ter or worse a charming hearing 
partner. The happy couple live 
at 5445 Camden St. 

V 

Charles Seaton, '93, is dean of 
the growing Gallaudet colony in 
Romney, West Virginia. Besides 
Charles the following claim the 
town their residence place: James 
R. Kirkley, N-'37, Principal of 
the State School; Margaret Hau- 
berg, '03; Susie Koehn, '43; 
Richard (Dick) Kennedy, '42; 
Frank Sullivan, '41. Charles D., 
no one in the teaching profession 
can forget that name, will in the 
fall round out half a century as 
a classroom pedagogue. His name 
certainly deserves a place on the 
Scroll of Honor of those who 
have given their lives to the 
cause of the children of silence! 
v 

Mrs. E. L. Schetman's husband 
is editor of the West River Pro- 
gress, Dupree, S. D. (If you 
do not know it, Mrs. Schetman 
is the former Cora M. Reed, 



Compliments 
of tto 

Curb Cafe 

714 H. St., N. B. 



ex-'98). Editor Schetman has 
been writing and fighting for 
twenty years to induce the legis- 
lature of his state to take a step 
toward and remove the State 
School for the Deaf and the State 
School for the Blind from the 
jurisdiction of the Board of Char- 
ities and Correction, and placed 
under the control of the Board of 
regents. 

Very few such schools are 
ciassed as they are in South Da- 
ivoui. iney aie in trutn not cnar- 
uaDie institutions. T li e y are 
scnools for tnese handicapped 
children, and as such properly 
should be placed under the con- 
trol and influence of the State 
uoard of Education. Away with 
uie stigma! 

V 

If you have lost track of 
Henry fc>. Austin, '18, he is still 
in St. Petersburg, Fla., "doing 
his bit," as Rev.. Dr. H. C. Mer- 
rill, 9 6, writes. 

V 

The daughter of Mrs. J. H. 
Mcllvaine of Kansas (Margaret 
McNaughton, an ex) is a publi- 
cist employed by twentieth Cen- 
tury-Fox. It is her duty to keep 
the names of the studio's stars 
before the public. The daughter, 
we are informed, uses the pen 
name of "Miss Kolma Flake." 
She is well acquainted with Dick 
Haymes, "King of the Juke 
Boxes" — "who crooned out §200,- 
000 in less than a year." She also 
knows very well the crooner, 
Frank Sinatra, and other head- 
liners of the ether. 

_V" 

George R. Culbertson, '38, and 
wife (Marjorie Forehand, '40) 
are contented and, you should 
know, very, very well pleased 
with the cupid who brought them 
together. On their own Spanish 
bungalow in the suburbs of Nor- 
folk they cook and putter around 
and take it easy, for both hold 
down high paying jobs — he as an 
aircraft instrument mechanic — ■ 
involving the over-hauling, test- 
ing, calibrating and installing of 
all types of aircraft instruments. 
Marjorie, in slacks of course, is 
a mechanic learner who has dis- 
covered her latent talent — mech- 
anical ability. Cubby is no dog 
in the manger, for he has ap- 
proached and induced the au- 
thorities to take on other college 
educated deaf people. That's the 
right spirit. Cooperation and 
unity is a service in the true 
sense of the word. 

. V ■ 

February 19 was a day to be 
remembered by the deaf folks of 
Oakland, Calif., when Louis Dyer, 
ex-' 31 — floorman of the celebrat- 
ed combination — Dyer - Cosgrove 
— brought his Los Angeles team 
north and demonstrated h i s 
knack for placing a winning team 
on the hardwood floor. His bas- 
ketball team won over the Oak- 
land Silents by just one point 
32 - 31 — by a last minute goal. 
The other half of the one-time 
Dyer- Cosgrove team — Cos- 
grove, '31, is said to be in Ariz- 
ona. 

. v 

Dorothy De Laura, '30, (nee 
Denlinger) is in the City of the 
Angels for good now. For ever 
so many years it was known that 
Dot and her mother crossed and 
recrossed the continent each sum- 
mer in order to take in the mild 
climate that has made Los Ang- 
eles the large city that it is. This 
last time however Dot concluded 
that a one-way ticket would be 
a satisfactory investment and so 
she left her old home and head- 
ed west where she has found new 
life, new hope and new this and 
that. 

V 

The stork once again visited 
the home of Richard M. Phillips 
and wife ('40 and ex-'40), lear- 



ing a sweet little girl. The first 
child is a boy. Dick formerly 
taught in the Indiana School but 
higner pay luied him to an in- 
dustrial plant. Disliking the 
monthly calls of a landlord Dick 
and his good wife wisely con- 
cluded that ownership of a home 
was not only best for them but 
was also the proper place to rear 
children. And so they withdrew 
their savings and purchased a 
home in Indianapolis — and, we 
learn, are supremely happy. 



And still the good stork wings 
his way from roof to roof, bring- 
ing joy to worthy alumni homes. 
Latest arrival? At the home of 
Robert Lankenau, '42, in Akron, 
Ohio. Bob has not announced to 
us the name of the litle fairy but 
we are sure she is a heaven- 
sent gift to worthy parents. Bob 
is, you are aware, a chemist at 
i- irestone. 

.y 

Clive D. Breedlove, '39, is in 
Indianapolis manipulating the 
keys of a linotype for a long 
afternoon daily. He is a steady," 
having been with the plant over 
three years. Clive must be an 
expert at his trade judging by 
his neatly typed letter to the 
Alumni Editor. It is indeed flaw- 
less. 

V 

Jonh O'Brien, '32 and wife 
(Juanita Vaughn, "34) have two 
fine children. Since 19 36 John 
has been printing instructor at 
the Indiana State School. At the 
end of last year his assistant left 
the school and so John has been 
forced to do double work. At the 
same time he is Scoutmaster. It 
is said that the willing horse bears 
the heaviest load, but in this 
exigency John feels that he is 
rendering a patriotic service. 
That is the true missionary spirit 
that should motivate all who take 
up the training of children as a 
life work. 

V — 

Robert C. Miller, '03, is taking 
it easy in Charlotte, N. C. To 
while away time he loves to recall 
the time when he spent 23 years 
teaching in the Morganton School. 
After leaving the classroom he 
became a gold digger and cowboy 
in Nevada. Returning to his home 
state, he became foreman of a 
group of deaf employees in a 
chair factory. At the same time 
he was honored by being appoint- 
ed a director of his alma mater. 
When his term expired he next 
found himself in Washington. 
There he built and sold houses. 
Bob has two sons. One is in the 
army and the other is working 
in a San Francisco airplane fac- 
tory. There's a busy life well 
spent! 

— V 

"Why confine your page in the 
Buff and Blue to living alumni?" 
— So writes Albert Berg, '86, and 
then appends the following in- 
teresting reminiscence: "Tom 
Lynch, '86, my classmate from 
Illinois, a tower of strength on 
our football squad, a 200 pounder, 
strong as an ox, yet fast on his 
feet as a gazelle * * * In the 
fall of '88 I got some of the col- 
lege boys together at Indianapolis 
— Lynch, Walter Marsh, an ex-, 
Sansom, '80, and others, to play 
a Thanksgiving Day game with a 
crack Indiana College team, win- 
ning by an overwhelming score. 
Lynch died of typhoid fever about 
a year later, Sansom lived to be 
only 50 and the rest, myself ex- 
cepted, have made their last 
tackle." 



Prof. J. A. Tillinghast 
Dies ot Lung trouble 

We regret to learn that Prof. 
Joseph A. Tillinghast, N-'92, 
passed away on February 25 after 
confinement in a Spartanburg, 
S. C. hospital fighting a lung 
trouble which came upon him 
through overwork. Our friend 
was professor of Sociology at 
Converse College (a college for 
women). Formerly he was super- 
intendent of the Montana School, 
and also of the Belfast, Ireland, 
School for the Deaf and the Blind. 
He was also a member of the 
Board of Directors of the South 
Carolina School for the Deaf. 

When the Alumni Editor was 
in Belfast in the . early fall of 
19 38 he visited the Belfast School 
and was surprised when the su- 
perintendent mentioned that Prof. 
Tillinghast had been head of the 
Irish school long ago. The school 
seemed to be well conducted, but 
the buildings are not what we 
would call strictly modern. The 
pupils there are younger than 
the average in our American 
schools because, it was under- 
stood, they do not remain longer 
than middle teen age. 

V 

Howard Tracy Hofsteater, '30, 
sends us the following item which 
we print as is: 

"To the best of my knowledge, 
Charles E. Jones, ex-, and Mrs. 
Jones (Opal Prevatt, ex-14) of 
Talladega, Ala., are the only Gal- 
laudet "ex"es enjoying the di- 
stinction of being admitted to 
Masonry. Mrs. Jones is a mem- 
ber of the Talladega lodge of the 
Order of the Eastern Star, while 
Mr. Jones is now a Shriner. In 
1925, a Mason was appointed to 
test Mr. Jones' hearing, and it 
so proved he could hear well 
enough with the aid of some 
lip-reading, to keep up with the 
ritual. He went through the 
works the same as anyone else. 
Recurring attacks of the flu great- 
ly impaired his hearing but last 
fall when at long last he got 
a hearing aid he liked, he decided 
to study for Shrinedom and was 
'given the works". In his own 
words, "he would not take a 
thousand dollars for the exper- 
ience, and would not take anotner 
thousand to go through it again." 
Mrs. Jones joined the O. E. S. 
some time after Mr. Jones be- 
came a Free and Accepted Mason. 
She is an accomplished lipreader." 

We have a hazy recollection 
of having heard that the late 
Louis Divine, '94, was a Mason. 
As far as the Alumni Editor 
knows there are two totally deaf 
members of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows — the 
Alumni Editor and a non-gradu- 
ate. It may interest others to 
know that the Odd Fellows, like 
the Masons, never admitted deaf 
men because in the lodge no 
writing is permitted. But the re- 
sourceful Dr. William A. Cald- 
well, Hon. -'24, overcame the ob- 
jection by proving to the satis- 
faction of the Odd Fellows that 
the entire ritual could be gone 
through by the deaf applicant 
without the use of pad and 
pencil — by the use of the manual 
alphabet. And so to the aston- 



Compliments 
Glass of '47 



ishment of some two hundred 
members the deaf applicants 
went through the various rituals 
without a hitch, Dr. Caldwell 
always being at their side inter- 
preting the questions and re- 
marks of the Noble Grand, and 
the two applicants (or candidates 
for degrees) responding orally. 
The doors now seem to be open 
— why not? But to be able tc 
speak orally is still neecesary — 
always will be. 

V 

William Henry Chambers, ex- 
'03, writes that we erred when 
we said in a former issue of the 
Huff and IJlue that he was a 
"contributor" to the Tennessee 
Observer. He says he is in fact 
Editor of the Alumni Page of his 
school's paper. To us it some- 
times seems to be harder to be a 
contributor of original copy than 
to be editor. 

V 

Howard Hofsteater, '30, was 
invited to give a talk on "World 
Events" to the pupils of the 
Berkeley, Calif., School March 5. 
Being a past master of the sign 
language, Hoffy kept the audi- 
ence spell bound for an hour. It 
is the policy of Superintendent 
Elwood A. Stevenson, N-'ll, to 
have his teachers' committee 
invite successful adult deaf men 
and women to give the pupils of 
the school talks, readings and 
lectures at their Sunday evening 
assemblies — also on the observ- 
ance of holiday programs. The 
Alumni Editor was the guest 
speaker February 11 — Lincoln's 
birthday. 

V 

Mrs. Alfred E. Marshall (Mar- 
garet Du Bose, '30 j spent some- 
time at her old home in Sardinia, 
South Carolina, recovering from 
an illness. Now she is back in 
Danville, Ky., fully restored — 
which accounts for the happy 
smile that Alfred, '31, seems al- 
ways to wear wherever he may be. 
V 

In sending items for the 
Alumni Page, writers aree kindly 
requested to put down the 
Alumni Editor's zone number — 
which is — Oakland 11, Calif. The 
postmaster has continually re- 
quested this in order to facilitate 
mail distribution. 

\- 

The Fulton, Miss., Chapter of 
the Gallaudet College Alumni As- 
sociation held its annual meeting 
on Dr. E. M. Gallaudet's birth- 
day, February 5. Several reels 
having to do with Kendall Green 
activities were shown and refresh- 
ments and conversation topped 
the happy meeting. The following 
officers were elected for tne year: 
President, Henry J. Reidelberger, 
'38; Vice-President, Anna Marino 
Koziar, '34; Secy-Treas., Stephen 
W. Koziar, '34. 



Dr. Best's Book Is a 
''Must" in tvery Library 

Harry F. Best, N-'02, is a 
professor in the department of 
s o c io 1 o g y, University of Ken- 
tucky. He has devoted much 
time to the study of the deaf and 
now has an exhaustive book on 
the market entitled: "Deafness 
and the Deaf in the United 
States." The book is complete 
in every detail and is published 
by the Macmillan Company, 60 
Fifth Avenue, New York City, 
N.Y. Harry is a staunch friend of 
of the deaf — a power at court — 
and his book should be in the 
hands of all members of the pro- 
fession and the educated deaf 
themselves. The book should also 
be in the library of every 
institution of learning in the 
land, and also in every public 
library. So get your copy and 
push along this wonderful mes- 
sage of a learned sociologist 
whose devotion to the cause of 
the deaf deserves commendation 
unalloyed — and financial reward. 
_V 

Perhaps we forgot to record 
the fact that in the football game 
between the unbeaten team from 
the Georgia School and the Ala 
bama School last November 27, 
the Alabama eleven won 34-0. 
The Georgia boys were coached 
by Olaf Tollefson, '37, and the 
Alabama team by Harry L. 
Baynes, '2 3. Harry is a hustler. 
He not only gives much of his 
time and thoughts to sports, but 
he also is interested in the Dixie 
Home for the Aged Deaf. At the 
football game in Talladega, No- 
vember 27, he passed the hat 
around, as it were, and collected 
$118.25 by selling tickets for a 
contest "to determine the 'Miss 
A. S. D.', and the 'Miss Birming- 
ham' for the Homecoming game" 
(at the Alabama School). 
V- 

Raymond T. Atwood was mar- 
ried to a Miss Catherine Joell in 
St. Louis, Missouri, February 3. 
Ray received his bachelor's degree 
from Gallaudet in '39. He then 
went to the Louisiana State Uni- 
versity to study bacteriology. In 
due time he was rewarded with 
the degree of Master of Science. 
Now he is a bacteriologist for the 
famous Anheuser-Busch brewery 
in St. Louis. 



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SAT. APRIL 15 



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Volume LIT, Number 11 



GALLAUDET COLLEGE, KENDALL GREEN. WASHINGTON. L). C. 



Monday, April 10, 1944 



Kappa Gamma Has 
Annual Banquet 

Celebrating its forty-fourth year 
of Vishnu's reign, the Kappa 
Gamma Fraternity held its annual 
banquet at Hotel Twenty-Four 
Hundre d, Saturday evening, 
March 25. Thirteen new brothers, 
including two honorary members, 
were honored in the presence of 
forty-one veterans of the Broth- 
erhood. The Rev. Otto Berg- 
opened the banquet with a prayer. 

When all had eaten their fill 
of roast chicken and had topped 
it off with delicious Southern 
pecan pie, toasts were drunk with 
the traditional Nectar de Vishnu 
to the new Brothers together with 
wishes to maintain their strength 
and uphold he future of the Fra- 
ternity. Bro. Earl Rogerson, '41, 
of Staunton, Va., was guest speak- 
er for the evening and Bro. Bald- 
ridge, Grand Rajah of the Fra- 
ternity, Toastmaster. 

After the toasts had been 
quaffed, the Toastmaster intro- 
duced Dr. Percival Hall, founder 
of the Kappa Gamma Fraternity, 
who has never missed a Fraternity 
banquet since its beginning in 
1901. He gave a very interesting 
and impressive talk on the 
achievements of the Fraternity, 
following which Bro. Leonard 
Meyer, Tahdheed, spoke a few 
words for the absent Brothers. 
Bro. Rogerson then spoke on 
"Happiness". He stated that in 
his opinion, true happiness could 
be attained only by pursuing a 
wholly unselfish way of life, in 
which only the real necessities 
of comfortable living are striven 
for. Speaking to the members of 
Kappa Gamma, Bro. Rogerson 
remarked that he could think of 
no better way for a college grad- 
uate to traverse the road of 
Happiness than by taking up the 
teaching profession. A sense of 
comfort and achievement is ob- 
tained from watching erstwhile 
pupils and students turn out 
work well-done — and in knowing 
that the teacher's influence has 
played a major part toward this 
end. Bro. Rogerson's speech was 
greatly enjoyed as was evidenced 
by the applause. 

After a few concluding remarks 
by the Toastmaster, the banquet 
was over and so was the joyous 
evening. The banquet was quite 
successful and left lingering in 
its aftermath brighter hopes for 
an equally successful forty-fifth. 

Much credit is due to the ban- 
quet committee for their excel- 
lent work in planning this affair. 
The committee consisted of Bro. 
William McClure, Bro. Earl El- 
kins, Bro. Charles Pollock, Bro. 
Wayne Furlong. Among the out- 
of-town Brothers were Bro. Earl 
(Continued on page 3) 



Preps Take Charge 
Of Literary Program 

Making their debut in Gallaa- 
det literary circles, the Prepara- 
tory Class presented the regular 
Literary Society program in Chap- 
el Hall on the evening of March 
17. Considering their inexperi- 
ence, they did a wonderful job of 
entertaining the student body. 

Ralph White, '4 6, President of 
the Literary Society, opened the 
program with a brief announce- 
ment and explanation of the 
forthcoming Literary Contest. 
The program-proper began with 
Leslie Massey, P. C, giving a 
rendition of "The Psalm of Life."' 
A short story entitled "After 
Twenty Years," signed by George 
Babinetz, P. C, was next on the 
program. "Big Clans and Little 
Claus," a humorous and fantastic 
story by Lawrence Leitson, P. C, 
kept the audience entertained for 
the next few minutes, after which 
Lawrence Newman, P. C., gave 
another absorbing story, "Johnny 
Got His Gun," in which he real- 
istically described the ironies of 
fate in warfare. As a grand-finale 
to the program, a group of Pre- 
paratory boys, Kenneth Jamie- 
son, Carl Barber, Burton Schmidt, 
and Herbert Goodwin, presented 
a short skit entitled, "If Men 
Played Cards As Women Do." 

Following the program, a short 
social brought the activities in 
Chapel Hall to an end for the 
second term. 

V 

Rev. Berg Speaks on 
'Marriage <&- Divorce' 

Chapel services for Sunday 
evening, -March 2 6, .veie conduct- 
ed by the Reverend Otto C. Berg, 
'38, of Baltimore, Mel. The sub- 
ject of his talk was "Marriage 
and Divorce." 

The Reverena jtferg outlined in 
clear and concise detail the funda- 
mental factor of a successful and 
happy marriage, duty. To have a 
strong sense of duty towards each 
other, said the speaker, both hus- 
band and wife must love each 
other devotedly. In his comments 
on divorce, he strongly supported 
the church in its belief that all 
divorces are unnecessary and are 
a fundamental factor in the disin- 
tegration of a nation. Annul- 
ments, however, are accepted by 
the church. Such errors as cou- 
sins marrying and not finding out 
until after the marriage cere- 
mony, or if either of the party 
in a marriage discovers the other 
to- be insane, are considered by 
the church to be good, sound, and 
valid reasons for the separation 
of such unfortunate couples. 



DEAF AND NOT SO DUMB 



By Clyde W. Johnson 

in the Saturday Evening Post 

October 2, 1943 

This has been a happy year for 
Dummy Taylor, the great deaf- 
mute pitcher for the old New 
York Giants. Dick Sipek, a pro- 
tege of Dummy's from the Illinois 
School for the Deaf, broke into 
professional ball as an outfielder 
with the Birmingham Barons, 
Southern Association farm team 
of the Cincinnati Reds. Birming- 
ham, in turn, farmed him out to 
the Erwin, Tenn., club of the Ap- 
palachian League, but Sipek hit 
so hard — .424 — that the Barons 
recalled him in midseason. At 
Birmingham, one month from the 
end of the season, he was batting 
.319. 

Even if Sipek eventually be- 
comes the second deaf player to 
attain big league stardom, he will 
be hard to put to fill the special 
niche Dummy Taylor occupied. 

Dummy's own favorite tale 
stems from his practice, when 
irked by an umpire's decision, of 
telling him off in sign language 
with perfect impunity. One after- 



noon he pulled this on Hank 
O'Day. To his horror, O'Day 
spelled back on his fingers. "You 
go to the clubhouse. Pay $25." 
After the game Dummy learned 
that O'Day had a deaf relative 
who taught him the code. 

Dummy was the victim of 
countless pranks during his ma- 
jor-league career, but he took 
them in good spirit, and frequent- 
ly turned the tables. A reporter 
who traveled with the Giants has 
said that there was rarely a night 
when the club was on the road 
that Dummy did not appear in 
the Pullman with his hands full 
of ice or salt destined for the 
berths of those responsible for 
the day's deviltry. 

Although Dummy was publi- 
cized chiefly for his madcap antics 
on and off the diamond, he was 
also recognized as one of the 
greatest pitchers of his day. "If 
anybody should ask you who is 
the real bon bon of the world's 
champions," Sports Oracle Boze- 
man Bulger once wrote, "tell him 
his name is Taylor and you'll 
win." 

(Continued on page 3) 



O.W.LS. Banquet New 'Night Club" 
Held at Statler Sponsored by K G 



Thirty-three O.W.L.S. members 
were present at the annual ban- 
quet held in honor of the new 
owlets at the Hotel Statler on 
the evening of March 25. The 
hotel interior was breath-taking 
and luxuriant in its splendor, as 
was the banquet room, gaily 
brightened up by the presence of 
daffodils, the flower of the sorori- 
ty. Four efficient waiters demon- 
strated remarkable service and 
the food was painfully remini- 
scent of pre-war times. 

Toastmistress Caroline Til- 
linghast, '44, began the evening's 
program by presenting Carlie 
Todd, '44, who gave the welcome 
address to the new members. She 
humorously reviewed the days of 
probation and thanked the new 
members for being good sports 
and making their trial period an 
enjoyable one, rather than a dark 
blot in their memory. Estella 
Wood, '47, delivered the response, 
which was written by Gertrude 
Slattery, '4 6. She also threw a 
backward look on the days of 
restriction, recalling the changes 
in their attitudes toward things 
in general that took place during 
that time. 

Guest speaker of the evening 
was Mrs. Alan B. Crammatte, '35, 
who delighted her audience with 
an exceptionally interesting and 
informative talk on "Without 
Thought of Self." She covered 
in detail the various branches of 
the armed services open to women 
volunteers today, and the impor- 
tance of each branch in the war 
program. The gist of her speech 
was that deaf people, who are un- 
able to serve their country in uni- 
form, can develop the same unsel- 
fish traits of these women ir. in- 
armed services, and do their part 
here at home. She also gave four 
pamphlets on the different mili- 
tary divisions to the girls for ref- 
erence. For accurate presenta- 
( Continued on page 3) 



Dr. Percival Hall's home was 
converted into the night club, 
"Casa Caliente," front 8 p. m. 
to 10:30 p. m. Saturday night, 
March 18. Guests at the "night 
club" were the members of the 
Kappa Gamma Fraternity and 
their lady friends. 

The candidates for admission 
to the Fraternity, under the 
direction of Prof. Jonathan Hall, 
planned an informal party of the 
night club variety which was 
held in the parlors of Dr. Hall's 
home. These rooms were dec- 
orated to resemble the night 
club, "Casa Caliente." Entertain- 
ment was afforded by the Frater- 
nity candidates who gave several 
floor shows. The guests also 
enjoyed dancing to the merry 
strains of Keith Lange, '47, and 
his victrola. In between dances 
the couples partook of excellent 
refreshments. Several faculty 
members of the Fraternity were 
present at the party. 

Near closing time, the club 
had a humorous mix-up when 
the "hat girl" slipped and each 
person was forced to look for his 
own coat and hat. Everyone 
present enjoyed the evening 
hugely, and another such event 
is looked forward to in the 
future. 

V 

Dr. C. C. Hung 
Speaks in Chapel 

The Reverend C. C. Hung, 
minister of the Chinese Com- 
munity Church in Washington, 
suoke on the subject of "Chinese 
"hapel Hall, Friday 
evening, March 10. 

Dr. Hung gave a detailed ac- 
count of the three important 
religions in China which have 
influenced Chinese culture to 
such a great degree. He also ex- 



*7/*e Qooct SUlp. Qallcuule-t 

liy Howard L. Terry 

"They launched a ship, good sir, today, 

And named it GALLAUDET." 

"What's that — what's that, my boy, you say? 

I've ne'er heard of him yet. 

He couldn't have been much, so, pray, 

Who was this Gallaudet?" 

The man had writ with pen and pad 
With earnest kindness to the lad, 
Who, ne'ertheless, was deeply hurt 
At his reply, well-meant, yet curt. 

Said he, with just a shade of stammer, 
"This man was great, but had no glamor. 
His name's not mentioned on the street, 
And few know of him whom you meet. 
There was a time when boys like me 
Must live in darkest misery. 
They could not speak, they could not hear, 
And people shunned their presence near, 
And left them to their suffering, 
Each one a gibbering, shocking thing!" 

The man's attention had been won, 
He quickly wrote, "My boy, go on." 

"Well, then, into their life there came 

This man for whom the ship we name. 

With burning soul and loving heart 

He brought to them a wondrous art. 

With signs he made them understand — 

They learned to spell with nimble hand; 

He let the light of knowledge in 

Where ne'er before had knowledge been. 

They learned the names of things about; 

They laughed and played with merry shout; 

The darkness that had been their lot 

Had passed away, dead and forgot. 

They learned to think, they learned to read, 

They learned to work, they learned the Creed — 

They changed from dead things into life! 

And so, good sir, we deaf are rife 

With love for this man Gallaudet, 

For whom the ship was named today, 

A name we deaf will ne'er forget, 

A man to honor, sir, alway." 

The man had list with grave intent. 
And as his homeward way he went, 
He blessed the hour, he blessed the day 
He met that boy upon his way. 

— Reprinted from The Silent Broadcaster 



Tea Given in Honor of Dr. Peet 
On Her Seventieth Birthday 



Literary Society Donates 
21 Books to College Library 

Mrs. Lorraine Kline, Librarian, 
has announced the addition of 
twenty-one new novels to the 
Gallaudet College Library. These 
books were presented to the li- 
brary through the courtesy of 
the Gallaudet College Literal y 
Society, and fulfill a need for ad- 
ditional modern novels for the 
Gallaudet "bookworms" to de- 
vour. 

Included among the new novels 
is the famous book by Lloyd C. 
Douglas, "The Robe". This book 
has long been one of the best sell- 
ers and was first published in 
October, 1942. Since that time, 
the book has been re-published 
no less than twenty-nine times. 
The copy presented to the library 
is the twenty-ninth edition and 
was printed in January, 1944. 
Also included on the list of new 
novels are such books as: "Excuse 
My Dust'', an account of the ear- 
ly days of the motor car, by Bel- 
lamy Partridge; "The Promise" 
and "China Sky", both novels of 
life in China, by Pearl S. Buck; 
"Victoria Grandolet", a story of 
a Louisiana family, by Henry Bel- 
laman; "The Weeping Wood", by 
Vicki Baum; "Lassie Come 
Home", by Eric Knight; "Also 
the Hills", by Frances P. Keyes; 
Clarence Day's humorous story, 
"Life With Father and Mother"; 
"The Mediterranean", a saga of 
the sea, by Emil Ludwig; "Good 
Night, Sweet Prince", the life of 
John Barrymore, by Gene Bowler; 
Robert Nathan's novel, "But 
Gently, Day"; Fannie Hurst's 
"Hallelujah"; "Thunderhead", by 
Mary O'Hara; "Wild Is The 
River," by Louis Bromfield; 
"Chicken Every Sunday," by 
Rosemary Taylor; "Snoot If You 
Must," by Lucius Beebe; and 
Emily Kimbrough's story, "We 
Followed Our Hearts to Holly- 
wood." 

Such an impressive list should 
furnish enough reading matter 
to satisfy even the most discrim- 
inating reader, and many thanks 
are due the Literary Society for 
placing additional fiction in the 
college library. 



plained the part Christianity is 
playing in China. After his lec- 
ture Dr. Hung showed the 
audience two reels of technicolor 
films portraying the various acti- 
vities of the Chinese Community 
Church. 

The college wishes to thank 
Dr. Hung for his interesting lec- 
ture, and also Dr. Elizabeth Peet 
and Prof. Frederick Hughes who 
arranged for Dr. Hung to speak. 



O.W.L.S. Give Reception 
At President Hall's Home 



Honoring the seventieth birth- 
day of their teacher, dean, and 
advisor, the Gallaudet and Di- 
strict Alumnae O. W. L. S. gave 
a tea for Dr. Elizabeth Peet at 
the residence of President Hall 
on the afternoon of March 26, 
from 3 to 5 o'clock. About two 
hundred gmsts were received by 
Dr. Peet, Dr. Hall, Miss Caroline 
Tillinghast, the President of the 
active O. W. L. S. chapter, and 
Miss Helen Fay. 

Lending glamor to the receiv- 
ing room were two vases contain- 
ing seventy red and white roses, 
presented to Dr. Peet by the stu- 
dent body of Gallaudet. Dr. Peet 
was becomingly attired in black, 
wearing an orchid, a gardenia, 
and carrying a gay boquet. The 
„ w orchid wai 

part of the 
gift sent to 
her by the 
N a t i o nal 
O.W.L.S. In 
a letter to 
the Gallau- 
det O. W.- 
L. S., Mrs. 
Tom L. An- 
cle r s o n , 
President 
of the Na- 
tional O.W. 
L.S., said, 
' ' I would 
like for 
Miss Peet 
to know that the hundreds of 
Alumnae O. W. L. S. are with her 
in spirit on the occasion." Many 
other floral tributes were sent 
from numerous sources, trans- 
forming Dr. Peet's living quarters 
into a colorful flower nook. 

The guests mingled in the spa- 
cious parlors and partook of at- 
tractive refreshments served in 
the dining room. Mrs. Olaf Han- 
son, '93; Mrs. R. J Stewart, '17; 
Mrs. Harley D. Drake, '05; and 
Mrs. Walter J. Krug, '30, 
presided at the tea table. The 
highlight of the afternoon was 
the pesentation of the snowy 
three-tier birthday cake, with the 
guests merrily singing, "Happy 
Birthday to You," as Dr. Peet cut 
through its frosty depths. 

Those active on the committee 
for the arrangement of the recep- 
tion were Misses Frances Lupo, 
Malvine Fischer, Clarice Petrick, 
'44; and Clarhelen Wilkins, '45. 
Thoroughness on their part ac- 
counted for much of the confident 
ease with which the tea pro- 
gressed. The district Alumnae O. 
W. L. S. and the Akron chapter 
contributed greatly to the success 
(Continued on page 4) 




Senior to Train for Unique Positioji 



Ry Christel Brdmanii 
Roberta Herrmann, of the Class 
of '44, has recently received 
notice that she has been accepted 
as a student in a medical techni- 
cian training course at the Sibley 
Memorial Hospital here in Wash- 
ington. Her work will begin on 
June 1 at the hospital under the 
supervision of Dr. O. B. Hunter, 
nationally known in the field of 
pathology. It is an honor, indeed, 
to work under him. Miss Herr- 
man's work will consist of twelve 
months' training on the follow- 
ing tests: blood count, bacterial 
cultures, basal metabolism, the 
Wassermann, Kahn, Schick, non- 
protein and nitrogen tests, and 
some X-ray work. 

Miss Herrmann states that she 
had always wanted to be a nurse, 
but that her lack of hearing pre- 
vented her from reaching this 
goal. When her mother and an 
uncle suggested medical technol- 
ogy as a career, she became in- 
terested and decided to pursue 



this line of work. 

The requirements in experience 
for Miss Herrmann's particular 
type of job are sixty semester 
hours of Biology, Bacteriology, 
and Chemistry (organic, inor- 
ganic, and quantitative analysis), 
all of which she has obtained 
here. Upon completing her 
twelve months' training, Miss 
Herrmann will take an examina- 
tion given by the Board of the 
American Society of Clinical 
Pathologists (A. S. C. P.) and, if 
she passes it, she will receive a 
medical technician diploma. 

In Miss Herrmann's own 
words, she thinks that "more 
young deaf men and women 
should choose this interesting 
field for a career, because their 
lack of hearing will have no 
effect upon this kind of work. 
All they need is good eyes, hands, 
and health." Miss Herrmann is, 
to our knowledge the first wom- 
an student from Gallaudet ever 
to have such an opportunity. 



b'A'JE TWO 



The Buff and Blue 



Monday, April 10, 1944 



The 



and Blue 



Published once a month during October, De- 
cember, April and twice a month during Novem- 
ber, January, February, March and May. Entered 
at the Post Office at Washington as second-class 
mail matter. 

Subscription Price $2.00 per year 

(Payable in advance) 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Malvine Fischer, '4 4 

LITERARY EDITOR Bertt Lependorf, '4 4 

NEWS EDITOR Byron Hunziker, '4fi 

SPORTS EDITOR Lyle A. Wiltse, '46 

ASS'T SPORTS ED Clarhelen Wilkins, '45 

ALUMNI EDITOR Winfield S. Runde, '01 

ASSOCIATES 

Robert Panara, '4 5 Earl Elkins, '46 

Christel Erdmann, '46 

REPORTERS and COLUMNISTS 

Caroline Tillinghast, ".4 Carlie Todd, '44 
John Randolph, '4 5 Calvin George, '4 5 

Betty-Jo Raines, '4 6 Jean Smith, '46 

Ralph White, '46 Nadine Nichols, '46 

Earline Becker, '47 Thomas Fishier, '47 

Mervin Garretson, '4 7 

BUSINESS MANAGER Calv.n George, '45 

ASS'T BUSINESS MANAGER . Donald Padden, '45 
CIRCULATION MANAGER . Harold Steinman, '4 6 
ADVERTISING MANAGER . Charles Pollock, '4 4 

ASS'T ADV. MANAGERS . . Frank Sladek, '46 

Wayne Schlieff, P. C. 

PRINTERS 
Leonard J. Meyer, '44, FOREMAN 
William Brightwell, '46 Jason Amnions, '47 
Bertt Lependorf, '44 Wayne Furlong, '46 

Charles Pollock, '44 

PROOFREADER Eugene Schick, 47 



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As We See St 

Jean Smith, '46 




DR. PEET'S SEVENTY YEARS 

Dr. Elizabeth Peet, member of the G-allaudet 
College Faculty of long and high standing, has 
rounded out nearly three-fourths of a century of 
an eventful, busy life. It is fitting that to a lady 
who has dedicated her life to the education of the 
deaf we should make a tribute. 

Dr. Peet comes from an illustrious family, 
members of which have been prominent educat- 
ors of the deaf. She was born in New York City 
on March 26, 1874, the daughter of Isaac Lew.s 
and Mary Toles Peet, Her father and grand- 
father, Harvey Prindle Peet, were principals of 
the New York School for the Deaf. 

Dr. Peet has been with us since 1900 when she 
became instructor and later, professor of 
English under Dr. Edward Miner Gallaudet. 
The year before she entered Gallaudet College 
she taught at the Rhode Island School for the 
Deaf. Since then she has taught Latin and 
French to the upper classes and the proper use 
of the sign language to the classes of the Nor 
mal Department here. A great master of tin 
English language, she is also proficient in 
French, having visited Franc. 1 several times 
and studied at the Sorbonne. Wishing to keep 
abreast of the times, she now studies and teaches 
Spanish. 

In addition to her classroom duties, Dr. Pee', 
has also acted as Dean of the college women, in 
which capacity she has served for twenty-four 
years. She has seen hundreds of girls come and 
go, each staying a brief time under her pro- 
tecting wing. The moral and social standing of 
her girls has been kept high through never- 
ceasing care and guidance on her part. ' To 
many a new young woman student she has been 
as a bulwark against the uncertainties and con- 
fusion of changes in environment and social 
life. Not one graduate or former student of 
Gallaudet who has had the opportunity to know 
her can ever forget her. He will always remem- 
ber her with affection, as will the present stu- 
dents in the years to come. 

Considering her work these past forty-four 
vears, Dr. Peet can rest assured that hers is a 
life well spent, and that she has done a great 
service to the deaf. Gallaudet College extends 
to Dr. Peet its heartiest congratulations and 
its best wishes for happiness in the years to 
come. 



One of the best things 
about some of our college 
courses is the way their re- 
spective principles can be ap- 
^^^ plied to daily life. What is true 

■ : i v - .jfe:*^* '" <)1U> sense often goes for 
a 'Mi: her. 

In dramatics, we are learn- 
ing just that, but we are profit- 
ing double. For instance, we 
. ^ have learned that the actors of 
supporting roles are as im- 
portant to the success of a play as the one who 
carries off the !ead. Just as the union of several 
parts makes a whole, the cooperation of all actors 
makes a real show. Without one part, the whole 
is not obtained. 

We women a'en't supposed to be able to under- 
stand football, but the study of play production is 
an eye-opener to all^femmes who insist they know 
the game and then follow the guy who carries 
the ball. One of the important principles of 
dramatics, that the cast can "ham" or "shine" 
a star, should encourage football fans to keep an 
alert eye on the other ten players, too. They 
will be surprised how often timely blocking or a 
defiant line results in the "heroic, record-breaking, 
seventy yard dash which won a colorful victory 
for the Blues." The spectators will look for these 
little "lifesavers" because they have seen sup- 
porting actors in a play gracefully smooth out a 
false move or cleverly manuever the dialogue to 
perfection when it seemed necessary. These little 
contributions are evidence of thoroughness and 
alertness on the part of these actors. The audience 
never notices this, because it isn't intended to be 
seen. The sincere actor has no thougnt of collect- 
ing laurels by deliberately correcting the error in 
a play and revealing the blunder of a fellow- 
actor. His aim is to give a good play, not to win 
any favorism. 

This leads us to recall certain instances where 
the supposed "star" of the day wasn't the one 
who made some affair a push-over. There are 
many unsung heroes in every example of group 
accomplishment, who work for the good of the 
whole, and not for personal acknowledgment. 
Their names may not glitter in the lime-light of 
social fame, but their co-workers know them to 
be square and fair. We see this clearly now, 
after noting examples of such situations in play 
production. If a little under-cover work on the 
stage can save a play, then it is logical to assume 
that other units have the same factor. Without 
insult to the born leaders whom we hear so much 
about, we should look behind to see if there isn't 
some loyal frat brother, who prods his talented 
hero along the shining path to glory. 



r 



The Hurdy Gurdy 

Nadine Nichols, '46 & John Randolph, '45 



^: 




Pray tell! what does "The 
Prodigal Woman" have that 
the Fowler Hallites don't? 
Newman, eyes full of star- 
dust, has been going around 
urging the girls to read said 
book. Of course, an ounce of 
prevention . . . and curiosity 
killed the cat. 

Maybe you can blame this 

one on the moon, even though 

it is a rather distant reason 

for Toddy's putting the Seniors' mail in the Preps' 

box, and vice versa. You were in a hurry, weren't 

you, Toddy? 

The far celestial regions are geting lots of un- 
due (?) credit lately, 'cause it's writen in the stars 
that Stecker and F. Sladek celebrated the last 
basketball game of the season. 

"And, (this is C. Wilkins) the boys who went 
to donate blood, came back with silver safety pins 
on their labels." 

It's no use, Becker, we found you out. Don't 
say you don't know what we mean, either. Other- 
wise, what is "Go-Getter — How to Be One" doing 
out of the library under your own name? Leap 
Year, and literally! 

Kirkpatrick says Freret takes it too much to 
heart. Just because she got the book, "How to 
Make Love" for Christmas, doesn't mean she'll 
get credit for testing the experiments in it. 

He just knew it would happen. And it did!. 
Right in front of a group of ladies, too. For 
further information, see Jamieson. 

i -WW 
Spring has finally come 
after a series of false starts. 
With spring comes many 
things: increased "beauing" 
and tying loveknots, spring 
fever, decreased mental acti- 
vity, campus hour, and howls 
of glee from the knights of 
the diamond who have gone 
"loco" at being able to play 
at their beloved sport. Might 
mention that yours truly ap- 
preciates spring weather, too, but for a different 
reason. However, tree-climbing isn't exactly a 




pleasant sport, especially when one is no longer 
so agile. 

The O. W. L. S. probation period nas produced 
some interesting sights. . .Nichols giggling. . . 
Stark appearing so sad and wan that one could 
not help thinking she had lost her last friend. . . 
June again setting the pace in style — this time 
taking a hint from out of the past — when she wore 
black stockings! Perhaps about the most inter- 
esting, albeit a bit heart-breaking, sight was the 
temporary separation of Alms and Wood. 

Jean Smith insists on wearing men's shirts — 
and what's more—in a most unconventional man- 
ner in spite of adverse opinions from her male 
admirers. . .Newman not long ago observed 31 
"eye-poppers." Incredible to him — to us a matter 
of fact... The Sophs again exhibited that herd 
proclivity of theirs — this time by all going to 
class in absolutely identical clasu sweaters — e/en 
the female members. 

li l E9lllllllll!lll!i!lllillll!lll!!lll!llll!l . I 

Reader's Dri-Jest 

Caroline Tillinghast, '44 



pillllllllllilllllllllllllllW : 

| Campus Chatter | 

| Betty-Jo Raines, '46 & Ralph White, '46 1 



illil;l|'!|l!l!lllll 



iii]iiiiiiiiiii!iiii!iiiiiii!i;iiii iiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii, 





Small Marie, sitting on her 
grandfather's knee, after look- 
ing intently at his grizzly face 
and long white beard, asked 
him if he were in Noah's ark. 

"Certainly not," replied 
Grandpa. "What makes you 
ask that"? 

"Well, then, why weren't you 
drowned?" continued the little 
girl. 

* □ X 

Moe: Did you pass your exams? 
Joe: Well, it was like this you see — 
Moo: Shake! Neither did I! 

Both beautiful and dumb 
Must my true love be. 
Beautiful, so I'll love her, 
Dumb, so she'll love me. 

— Diamond back 

Doc: Why are you late? 

Malty; Class started before I got here. 

Beneath the moon he told his love. 

The color left her cheeks 
But on the shoulder of his coat 

It plainly showed for weeks. 

First: Queen Victoria touched my great uncle 
on his shoulder with a sword and made him a 
knight. 

Second: Hah! An Indian touched my great grand- 
father's head with a tomahawk and made him an 
angel ! 

— Exchange 

* n * 

The teacher asked Tom to give the principal parts 
of the verb "to run" in Latin. 
Tom: Pssst, Joe, What is it? 
Joe: (Whispering) Darned-if-I-know! 
Tom: Darnifino 

Darnifinare 

Darnifinari 

Darnifinatum 

Smiffy: Give me a glass of plain water with- 
out any flavor. 

D. S. Clerk: Without what flavor? 
Smiffy: Oh, I'll take it without vanilla. 
D. S. Clerk: You'll have to take it without choco- 
late. We have no vanilla. 

Professor Kline: Name a deadly poison. 

Bobbie: Aviation. 

Professor Kline: Oh come now, what do you 

mean? 

Bobbie: One drop will kill. 

He: Er-1-er-am seeking your daughter's hand. 
The-er-have you any objections? 
Papa: None at all, take the one that's always in 
my pocket. 

Drake: I once knew a man who spent twenty 
years writing one novel! 

White: That's nothing! I know a man who is 
spending his whole life finishing one sentence. 

— Wesleyan Pharos 

Fair damsel and her ardent swain 
He and she. 

The davenport held the ardent twain, 
But then a step upon the stair, 
And father finds them sitting there. 
He — — — and — — ■ — she. 

Remember that cheese you sold me 



On the day that Spring was 
to announce her coming, up 
popped "Mr. Slicky Sleet" and 
de-iced the Campus in hopes of 
getting a few broken legs oi- 
ls' ^ | noses. He didn't get any, how- 
^ : ever, for we all walked as 
slowly as one-year olds and 
nothing worse than cold feet, 
and cold hands for those girls 
Llm\ *JL whose boy friends were Kappa 
Gamma pledges, were reported. 
Corporal William Buescher and wife, Ella, were 
seen visiting the campus with Jean Smith, '46, as 
escort on the weekend of March 17. Mrs. Buescher 
is the sister of Arnold Daulton, '43. She was visit- 
ing her husband in camp for two weeks. 

Miss Nonie Watson, cousin of Charles Pollock, 
'44, was here to see him and to be present at the 
|||||||!i|||||||||||lill|||llllllll!!l|||||;illi:il!IIHIIiUll.li movies Saturday, March 11. 

Mervin Garretson, '47, underwent an operation 
for appendicitis recently. He is back among us 
and doing very nicely. 

William Brizendine, a familiar face on Kendall 
Green, showed up some time ago to pay a visit 
to Billy Brightwell, '46, and Warren Blackwell, 
'4 6, March 12. 

Mrs. Benjamin Burg came here March 10, to 
spend the week-end with her two daughters, Julia 
and Celia, and to help them celebrate their 
birthday. 

Mrs. Otis Findley, who formerly taught in Ken- 
dall School, is again teaching at the same school 
now. 

The weekend of March 2 5 
brought many visitors to the 
campus, among whom were 
Mrs. Alan Crammatte, '35, 
who was guest speaker at the 
0. W. L. S. banquet; Miss Susie 
Epoetin, '43; the Reverend Otto 
Berg, '38, who gave an inter- 
esting talk in Chapel Hall 
Sunday evening; Earl Roger- 
son, '41, who was guest speak- 
er at the Kappa Gamma ban- 
quet; and Ben Estrin, '43. Leon Baker, '42, came 
from Virginia with Mr. Rogerson just to get a 
glimpse of the campus, old friends and new faces. 

Miss Roberta Herrmann, '44, went home to 
Pennsylvania March 10, to see her parents and to 
get some things necessary for her work as an 
interne in the Sibley Memorial Hospital come 
June. 




The 


Poet' 


i 

s 


Pac 


k 


Contributions Made by 


the 


Student 


Body 



Qui das: 
yesterday? 
Grocer : 
Quidas : 



Yes, ma'am. 

Did you say it was imported or de- 



ported from Switzerland? 

* □ * 
Leppy: This essay on "Our Dog" is the same 
as your sister's. 

Pollai: Sure enough, it's the same dog. 

* n * 

And then there is the brilliant cub in the news- 
writing class who thought he should get a good 
grade because "no news is good news." 



THE STORM 

The night was clear, the moon was bright, 

When suddenly, in the sky 
Two huge black bellows, as tho in flight, 

Raced hurriedly on high. 

Nearer and nearer together they crept. 

Encircling the glowing moon 
While far below the people slept, 

Unaware of the approaching gloom. 

The winds howled, a whining fret, 

The thunder and echoes, a ceaseless roar; 

The lightning flashed, igniting the nocturnal jet, 
And thru each house, the light and noise did 
soar. 

First a splash upon the window pane, 

Then a pounding on the roofs; 
A flooded gutter, a roaring main, 

The splashes now stampeding hoofs. 

Then suddenly, the wind grew calm, 

The clouds departed once more; 
And all the world was just the same, 

As it had been before. 

— Gertrude Slattery and Earl Elkins, '46 



SPRING! 

The fragrant air lightly feels 

The crust of winter slowly peels. . . 

It is spring! 

The time when lovers' hearts are light, 

When birdies chirp with delight. . . 

It is spring! 

With unpremeditated joy 
And a spirit far from coy 
We welcome spring; 
For with boundless diversion 
We look at winter's conversion 
To spring. 

Ah! spring! ah me! ah love! 

Oh my! oh me! oh my dove 

It is spring! 

The time when people walk on air 

Without feeling of worldly care. . . 

It is spring! 

— Lawrence Newman, P. C. 



Monday, April 10, 1944 



The Buff and Blue 



PAGE THKEt 



g]llllllllllllllltllllllllllllilllllllllllll!llillllllllll!l!liiilllilii;UilllJl^iXi.i: > 

SPOUT SLANTS 

=: by Lyle Wiltse 



Silence once again reigns in Old Jim, and the erstwhile gentle- 
men can now enjoy the benefits of a long rest after months of 
merciless pounding by the varsity basketball players and by the 
none too gentle thumping afforded by the recent Intramural pro- 
gram. From now on, outdoor sports will be the order of the day 
and doubtless a welcome relief from the dark and gloomy interior 
of a stuffy gymnasium. Purity is the idea. Track practice will soon 
be in full swing; cleaning up operations are under way on Hotch- 
kiss field in preparation for the coming outdoor events under the 
management of Daniel Van Cott. This towering, deep-chested giant 
with the fog horn bellow and Puritanic visage, has the knack of 
making even the laziest slacker settle down in the harness and com- 
mence sweating off excess poundage. The main trouble lies in ob- 
taining voluntary workers from the male student body, most of 
whom seem reluctant, preferring a coke and a pleasant chat with 
the girl friend at the Drug Store to perspiration and honest toil. 
But, perhaps with the advent of warmer weather and less cloudy 
days, the urge to be in the great outdoors will wax hot and the man- 
power problem will have been solved. 

The Intramural Basketball and Volleyball tournaments were 
very well staged, and, in comparision to the Intramurals of a year 
ago, there was much similarity, the blood-and-thunder factor still 
persisting, with plenty of rough play in the offing. Attendance at 
each game, however, was at a minimum, which was a trifle disheart- 
ening. The personnel in general seemed to have lost interest grad- 
ually. Of course, such is to be expected when one certain sport has 
held away for several months straight and nothing by way of variety 
has been added in the interim. Roast beef, well done, is a tasty 
bill-of-fare, but to the individual who has been forced to live on 
that article of foodstuffs for months, an additional slice is repulsive. 

In the spring a young man's fancy lightly turns to thoughts of 

love — and, it might be added, Softball. When one sees Robert 

Panara on the campus adorned in baseball togs a-tuning up his bat- 
ting eye by sending balls sizzling in the general direction of Faculty 
Row where abide our mental piano tuners, ye olde Professors, one 
may conclude on the spot that spring is not very far away. Soft ball 
promises to be the up and coming sport this season and a team has 
been established under the management of Daniel Van Cott which 
will play with outside teams as members of the District of Columbia 
Recreational League, participating in twilight games twice weekly. 
Full particulars are not yet available. This will not in any way inter- 
fere with the soft ball Intramurals or whatever inter-class program 
to be put into effect. The soft ball season is yet some time away. 
In the meantime, the various Caseys of College Hall will commence 
practicing in preparation for the spring drive. 

The next varsity season on the program will feature Coach 
Sullivan and the Blue Bisons in track and field events, with Henry 
Krostoski holding the reins as manager. While there will apparently 
be a minimum of competition this year owing to the fact that many 
of the opposing colleges have cancelled track and field events for 
the duration, the Blues are eager and tugging away at the traces. 
In all probability, the line-up in order of events will turn out some- 
what as follows: 

100 and 220 yard dash — George and Brightwell. 

400 and 880 yard dash — Stanley and Kubis. 

Mile and 2 mile run — Fishier, Garretson, Marshall, Hines and Alms. 

Weights — Baldridge, Berg, Sladek and Broz. 

Pole vault — Massey and Broz. 

High Jump — Baldridge, Schleiff and Massey. 

liroad jump. .Stanley and Massey. 

Javelin — Berg, Brightwell, Kleberg Witczak and Lee, 

Hurdles — Berg, Massey and Hensley. 

Many of the above are veterans of good standing, especially 
Berg who broke the old College record in the javelin thcow lasit 
season by tossing the splinter 180 feet. Stanley and Brightwell are 
good in the dashes as is George who proved the dark horse in the 
dashes of last season. Of the green material as afforded by the 
Prep students, Massey is apparently very promising while Lee is 
developing into a good javelin thrower. All in all, the Bisons show 
considerable promise, and, if the training rules are followed to per- 
fection, should develop into a formidable outfit. 



GASSON STUI 



Photographers of the 1943 Buff and Blue 



1305 Conn. Avenue, N. W. 



DEcatur 1833 



12!lllllll!lllHllimilllllHIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIJ!IIIHIIIJIMIIIIiHlllllllimi[3IIIMIIM!lir2!lli 



If!' 



IGALLAUDET 



PHARMACY! 



Phone Atlantic 

1000 Flordia Ave., N. E. - Washington, D. C. % 
!ii!:i!!iiic3i!iiiiiiinic3iiiiiiiiiiiinmimiiiiiniiiHiiiiiiiC3iiiiiiiiiiiiC3iii!imniicaii£ii[iiiiiin 



Dr. Powrie Doctor gave his in- 
terpretation of "Each in His Own 
Tongue," a poem by William Her- 
bert Carruth, on Sunday evening 
in Chapel Hall at 7.30 p. m. His 
talk was inspired by a question 
presented by a Freshman student 
under Dr. Doctor's instruction, 
the question being how the con- 
stant conflict between evolution 
and religion could be explained. 

Following nis taiK, Malvine 
Fischer, '44, rendered "Each in 
His Own Tongue" in the language 
of signs. Her rendition was truly 
worthy of the praise she received. 
V 

DEAF AND NOT SO DUMB 



Basketball, Volley- Doctor Gives Own 
Ball Intramurals Definition of Poem 

Like a mighty man-o-war plow- 
ing its way through protesting 
seas, the formidable Junior 
cagers fired the final victorious 
salvo that blasted all opposition 
to kingdom come and netted them 
the Intramural Basketball Cham- 
pionship and brought the winter 
sports program to a close. Twice 
they came near being swamped 
themselves, once by the Prepara- 
tory five and again by the 
Sophomore basketeers, and it was 
only by some skilful maneuvering 
on their part that they succeeded 
in wriggling out by a bare one 
point margin in each count. The 
highest scoring factor for the 
new champs summing up the 
points of all four games of that 
individual team was Henry Kros- 
toski with thirty to his credit. 
Calvin George came next with 
twenty-eight points. 

The well polished Sophomore 
lads gave the Juniors a run for 
their money when they came near 
beating them out of their chance 
for the championship in a down 
and out game that ended up in 
canto four 21-2 to the Sophs' 
chagrin. Furlong was high scor- 
ing man for the Sophs, tallying 
thirty-six points while Brightwell 
chalked up twenty-seven. With 
such rough and ready material as 
constitutes this team and the 
excellent team work portrayed, 
next season's championship may 
pass on to them. 

Although the Freshman class 
was greatly handicapped by the 
loss of two players, due to appen- 
dicitis operations, they neverthe- 
less offered some stiff competition 
to the participating teams in the 
tournament. The Juniors fully 
realized that the Frosh quint was 
out on the floor to show their 
opponents what they could do 
when they met, but the Juniors 
won 19-13. Amnions led the pace 
for the Frosh by chalking up 
thirty-five points in four games; 
Lange and Stanley proved valu- 
able assets to the Frosh quint by 
placing twenty-eight and twenty- 
two points „in the basket respect- 
ively. 

For lack of players there were 
no separate Faculty and Senior 
teams this year. Instead they col- 
lectively formed their players in- 
to one team which strove val- 
iantly to win the basketball crown 
but made very little headway on 
the floor. The Fac-sen team went 
through the four games tallying 
only one win to three losses. 
Coach Sullivan led with thirty- 
six points to his credit while Mc- 
Clure placed second with twenty- 
eight. 

As usual the Preps were jinxed 
out of the championship by a few 
measly points. After all, one can 
not expect unexperienced boys to 
come to college and win any meet 
which requires the cooperation of 
all the players. 

Not to be forgotten is the more 
gentle sport .of volleyball in 
which the Fac-Sen team reversed 
their tactics to lug away the 
bacon with four wins and no 
losses, the Juniors taking runner- 
up honors followed closely by the 
Sophomores, Frosh and Preps. 



Continued from Page 1 

"Mathewson, McGinnity and I 
pitched as many as fifty games 
each season," Dummy recalls. 
"Matty started with the Giants 
the same year I did, but was al- 
ways too good for me, except in 
1906. I won thirty and lost 
twelve that year and received 
twenty-seven hundred dollars for 
the job. Matty's highest salary 
while I was with the club was 
three thousand. I started with 
the Giants at nine hundred a year 
and pitched forty-seven games one 
season for fifteen hundred." 

Dummy's spoken vocabulary 
consisted of two-syllable words 
uttered like a talking doll. None- 
theless, his staccato baby talk, 
consisting principally of papa and 
mamma, got the goat of more 
pitchers than the high-powered 
invective of old masters of the 
coaching lines. 

He often left his hotel door 
open in the evening because ot 
his inability to hear a knock. 
When the players knew that he 
was entertaining deaf friends, 
they would sneak in and break up 
the conversation by turning oft 
the lights. 

One night Taylor stayed out 
late with Mike Donlin. When 
they met the next day, Donlin 
asked if his wife had objected. 

"She raised cain," Dummy an- 
swered on his hands. 

"What did you do?" 

"I turned out the lights." 
— Reprinted from the Wisconsin 
Times. 

V 

Kappa Gamma Banquet 



Basketball 

W 
Juniors 4 
Sophs 3 

Frosh 2 



Volleyball 

L W L 

Fac-sens. 4 

1 Juniors 3 1 

2 Sophs 2 2 



Continued from Page 1 

Rogerson, Bro. Charles Seaton, 
Bro. Ben Estrin, Bro. Ivan Curtis 
and the Rev. Otto Berg. The thir- 
teen new members are as follows: 
Bros. English Sullivan and Tho- 
mas Kline honorary; Thomas 
Berg, Dewey Samples, Jason Am- 
nions, Thomas Fishier, Mervin 
Garretson, Calton James, Rud- 
olph Hines, Keith Lange, Eugene 
Schick, Robert Stanley and Mar- 
vin Marshall. 



Fac-sens. 1 3 Preps 



Preps 



4 Frosh 



1 3 
4 



Jack's Meat Market 

922 7th St., N. E. 

Fancy Groceries, Fruit And 

Vegetables 

Beer and Wine 

J. Greenstein, Prop. 



SHOP NEAR BY 



Gaffi 



ins 



Men's and Boys' Wear 



Dress and Sports Wear 



Work Clothing 



925 H Street, N. E. 



Phone TRindad 8833 



College Students 
Flock to Circus 



Organization Directory 



With the advent of spring 
comes the inevitable circus to 
refresh the memory and blow 
away the cobwebs from over- 
jaded minds. As guests of the 
Almas Temple, almost the entire 
student body was present in the 
Uline Arena on the afternoon of 
March 31, to witness the matinee 
performance of the Hamid-Mor- 
ton Circus. 

Amid an atmosphere of gyrat- 
ing clowns, squealing youngsters, 
and jabbering concessioners the 
performers went through numer- 
ous breath-taking and astonish- 
ing acts. These acts were care- 
fully selected from the Ringling 
Brothers, Barnum and Bailey, 
Cole Brothers, and Wallace 
Hagenback Shows and included 
such performances as Berosini 
and Company, who gave a sensa- 
tional exhibition of balancing on 
a high wire; The Kimris, French 
Aces of the Air, in their thrilling 
aeroplane act; Captain Spiller's 
Seals, a remarkable exhibition of 
animal intelligence; Alf Loyal's 
Dogs, a feature act given by a 
combination of French Poodles; 
and a hundred and one other acts 
too numerous to mention. It 
would really have required an 
expert contortionist to keep track 
of all the acts which were taking 
place in each of the three rings, 
but it seems certain that every- 
one was able to take in enough 
of the scene to keep him talking 
for weeks to come. 

It seems as if the circus were 
making fun of the O. P. A. be- 
cause in spite of the rubber 
shortage and rationing, there was 
an abundance of brightly colored 
balloons on hand, and the lion 
trainer even went so far as to 
give a beautiful beef-steak to one 
of the Bengal Tigers. Conse- 
quently this same trainer later 
rotrived the beef-steak from the 
tiger before he had a chance to 
eat it. We wonder if things have 
become so bad that tigers are 
b»ung fed on soy beans nowdays 
and have forgotten what meat is 
for. Before the show was over, 
the entire audience was laughing, 
gasping, and clapping as enthusi- 
astically as the most ardent of 
the younger circus fans. The 
show was ended by the sensa- 
tional "Miss Victory" who was 
shot from a cannon across the 
arena into a net. 

Taking all in all, a very plea- 
sant afternoon was enjoyed by 
all, and the Shriners of the Al- 
mas Temple have our sincere 
thanks for their courtesy. 



0. W. L. S. Banquet 



Continued from Page 1 

tion of facts, Mrs. Crammatte had 
to do much research work, but 
she was well rewarded in the re- 
action of her audience. 

In a lively monologue. Frances 
Lupo, '44, portrayed a rattle- 
brained girl who attended a movie 
merely to hook a date with a 
cute usher. Mrs. Ivan Curtis, '33, 
closed the program fittingly with 
her rendition of "The O. W. L. S.' 
Conclave," by Sara Tread well 
Ragna, '18. Then the ten new 
owlets were introduced to the 
eight alumnae members and wel- 
comed as sorority sisters by Presi- 



TKOMPSON'S 
BARBER SHOP 

Or.f-ans Place near Fla. Ave. 
tiair Cut As You Like It 

50 cents 
Hours: 11 to 8 
9 to 9 Saturdays 



If 1 1 II I III I IIIII Ell IE1 1 1 1 III II 1 1 II 1 1 C 1 1 1 F I * ^ u 

LITTLE I 

9th St., South otf G = 

Hearing aids for most seats! E 

First Run & Revivals E 
See Daily Papers for Programs = 



Associated Student 

Financial Department 

Pres Leonard Meyer, '44 

Vice-Pres. . . Galvin George, '4 5 

Secy. . . . Donald Wilkinson, '4 5 

Treas Henry Krostoski, '45 

Asst. Treas. . . Frank Sladek, '46 

Dramatic Club 

Pres Paul Baldridge, '44 

Vice-Pres. . . Leander Moore, '44 

Secy Mervin Garretson, '47 

Treas Ralph White, '46 

Gallaudet College 

Athletic Association 

Pres Charles Pollock, '44 

1st V.-P. . . . Donald Padden, '45 

2nd V.-P. . Henry Krostoski, '45 

3rd V.-P. . Herman Johnson, '46 

Secy Earl Elkins, '4 6 

Treas. . . . Marvin Marshall, '47 

Asst. Treas. . . . Lyle Wiltse, '46 



Gallaudet College Women's 

Athletic Association 

Pres Julia Burg, '44 

Vice-Pres Celia Burg, '45 

Secy. Betty Jo Raines, '4 6 

Treas Earline Becker, '47 

kappa Gamma Fraternity 

Grand Ra jah . Bro. Baldridge, '44 

Kamoos Bro. Padden, '45 

Tahdheed Bro. Meyer, '44 

Mukhtar .... Bro. Krostoski, 45 

Literary Society 

Pres Ralph White, '46 

V.-Pres. . Warren Blackwell, '46 

Secy Mervin Garretson, '47 

Treas Marvin Marshall, '47 

Movie Club 

Pres Meyer Plotitsky, '44 

Vice-Pres. . Harold Steinman, '46 

Secy Byron Hunziker, '46 

Treas. .... Marvin Marshall, '47 



O. W. L. S. 

Pres. . . Caroline Tillinghast, '44 

Vice-Pres Agnes Carr, '45 

Secy Jean Smith, '46 

Treas Marjorie Case, '4 6 

Librarian . . . Frances Lupo, '44 

Photography Club 

Pres Bertt Lependorf, '44 

Secy-Treas. . Leonard Meyer, '44 
General Mgr. . W. Blackwell, 46 

Men's Reading Room Committee 

Chairman . Meyer Plotitsky, '44 

Secy.-Treas. . Jack Hensley, '45 

Thomas Berg, '44 

Willis Ayers, '45 

James Drake, '46 

Cecil Alms, '46 

Young Men's Social Club 

Pres Ralph White, '46 

Vice-Pres. . Marvin Marshall, '47 

Secy Mervin Garretson, '47 

Treas Thomas Fishier, '47 

Young Women's Christian Assn. 

Pres Frances Lupo, *44 

V.-P. . . . Clarhelen Wilkins. *45 

Secy Nadine Nichols, '46 

Treas Aleat'ha Barnes, '46 

Lit. Chum. . . Arlene Stecker, '44 
Asst Chmn. . . Betty Stark, '45 



dent Tillinghast. Group photo- 
graphs were taken by a hotel 
agent, which will serve as a fitt- 
ing souvenir of the pleasant even- 
ing. 

V 



The sweetest bird builds near the 

ground, 
The loveliest flower springs low; 
And we must stoop for happiness 
If we its worth would know. 
—Swain. 




Mrs. Geo. L. Sutton 

Mrs. L. Sutton Bailey 

ATlantic 1153 

PEOPLES 

FLOWER SHOP 

"Say It With Flowers" 

900 H Street, N. E. 



PAGE POUK 



The Buff and Blue 



Monday, April 10, 1944 



NEWS OF THE ALUMNI 



By \\ infield S. Itunde, '01 



un account of ill health, Odie 
Vv'. L/nderhill, '0 8, has been given 
ioave of absence from his duties 
;u tiie North Carolina School for 
uie remainder of the school term. 
some years ago Odie lost his only 
son in an airplane accident and 
tlie loss gradually affected his 
nealtn. He and his son, a grad- 
uate of West Point, were devoted 
companions. It is hoped that the 
contemplated trip west will com- 
pletely restore him to his old self. 
V 

Louis A. Roth, '9 7, one of the 
dependable neavies of the Gal- 
laudet eleven of his day, is still 
at it — thinking and writing sport- 
ing news and events. In the Min- 
nesota Companion for February 
15 he has a lengthy article — a 
review — entitled: "History of 
Athletics". In it Louis relates the 
beginning of interest in sports at 
the school some sixty years ago 
when the boys were given guns 
to take pot shots at rodents that 
infested the buildings. From then 
on he traces the steps of athlet- 
ics in the dirt'erent branches. The 
article is not only interesting but 
it also is valuable for research 
data. 

. v 

Leslie A. Elmer, '11, has an 
article in the February Tennessee 
Observer entitled: "Responsibility 
and Duty of Teachers of the 
Deaf." It is a timely subject and 
the article will bear reading by 
all teachers of the deaf, both 
Hearing and deaf. Leslie lays 
particular stress on the necessity 
of hearing teachers visiting the 
clubs and homes of the adult 
deaf in order that when they 
step into the classroom they may 
understand the life, the dif- 
licuiites and "way-outs" that the 
future handicapped citizens will 
likely face after their school life 
comes to a close. In part he says: 

"Teachers of the deaf should 
be more realistic as well as ideal- 
istic in their teaching. The deaf 
child has been told that if he 
would study the lives of great 
men and women and follow them 
as a guide, he, too, would 
succeed and make his mark in 
the world. But the deaf person 
knows that his handicap is real 
in certain spheres of action or 
work and feels that he cannot 
match the ability of his more 
fortunate fellowmen, but he 
wants to know what the deaf 
themselves can do to make a liv- 
ing in competition with hearing 
people. The teachers should con- 
sider it an opportunity to be able 
to tell them of the successful 
deaf men and women who have 
overcome their handicap and are 
employed in many professions 
and trades working side by side 
with those who hear in a most 
successful manner. At the present 
time when our nation needs men, 
great opportunities are open for 
all men and women as never be- 
fore." 



Oldster graduates of Gallaudet 
should read the articles in Just 
Once A Month entitled: "Early 
Kendall School Teachers," by 
Mrs. Gloria Johnson Kehm. The 
articles are brief yet meaty bio- 
graphies of James Denison, Hon.- 
'69; Melville Ballard, '66; Sarah 
Harvey Porter. The biographies 
are so absorbingly interesting that 
we wish Mrs. Kehm would extend 
her research writings to include 
Theodore A. Kiesel, '81; John B. 
Hotchkiss, '69; Amos G. Draper, 
,7 2; Joseph C Gordon; Samuel 
Porter; John W. Chickeriug; 
Charles R. Ely; Edward A. Fay; 
Allan B. Fay and others. These 
biographies would make up quite 
an attractive volume. It would 
require much time and the only 
compensation would probably be 
the feeling that a worthwhile pro- 
ject had been given to the store 
of literature having to do with 
our specialized teaching profes- 
sion. 



A sign language class has been 
siarieu at trie rtoinney, (West 
va.; school. ine instructors aie 
xCiCiiara (.DicKj ivennedy, '42; 
rranK buuivan, 4r, ana Susie 
ivoehn, '43. 

John A. Dex^ance, a lormei 
<Jallaudet student rrom Nortn Da- 
kota, is in the armea seiVice of 
the united States stationed some- 
where up in Alaska. He says it 
is -lonely up there and that leite.s 
and papers are a real treat, in 
me hard life, where nature is 
narsii, John meets the good anil 
not so good among men. Still, 
ue considers tne experience in- 
teresting and even not without 
compensation. lou may know 
that this rugged son oi Gallaudet. 
is also a poet whose songs glorify 
the silence of the mountains. 
V 

The following item from the 
c'aiiiorma News is from Hie pen 
of Byron B. Burnes, 26: 

"A man wiiose iace tuey sel- 
dom saw, but wnose name wab 
known to an tne grauuaies oi 
ualiaudet College tor a quarter 
ul a century, passed away on Octo- 
ber 10. He was the Reverend ut. 
c xysses Grant Baker Pierce, bee- 
retary of the Board of Directors 
of the Columoia Institution tor 
tne Deaf. One of ins official du- 
ties was to sign tne diplomas is- 
sued by Gallaudet College, anu 
ins imposing signature, along with 
those of the President of the Uni- 
ted States and the president of 
the College, grace many an alum- 
ni wall. 

According to Just Once a Month, 
Dv. Pierce died at the age of 78. 
He was pastor of All Souls' Uni- 
tarian Church in Washington for 
42 years." 

V 

Howard M. Quigley, N-'27, 
Supt. of the Olathe, Kansas, 
School for the Deaf has a timely 
article in the Kansas Star under 
the caption: "Sidelines '. in ii 
ne relates some pertinent facts 
concerning the lesponsibilities ot 
the training of the young of to- 
day. What he says about the 
education of the deaf wil be of 
interest to students of Gallaudet 
and others who contemplate en- 
tering the profession. We quote 
the following: 

"If any direct criticism is to be 
levelled at educational methods 
one might say that the most ob- 
vious one is that the schools seem 
to have failed to create within 
the minds of the students an 
awareness of their opportunities 
and the need of taking advan- 
tage of those opportunities. 

"No matter what educational 
methods are employed there can 
be no altering of the goals which 
develop mental discipline for the 
individual, and the ability to 
think for himself. 

"Schools like ours are forced 
by their residence requirements 
to be almost wholly responsible, 
during the school months, for the 
all-around development of the 
students. We must educate the 
children, provide proper social 
and recreational programs, and 
be mother and father to them. 
The need for properly trained 
persons who have the responsi- 
bility of the children can readily 
be apreciated. Unfortunately, 
such trained persons are few and 
far between, and are usually at- 
tracted to positions where the 
pay scale is much higher. 

'Therefore, educating the deaf 
children in our school is more 



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than just giving them classroom 
instruction. Our plans must in- 
clude all phases of the student's 
life, since he has his home in the 
school during the school term of 
nine months. The other three 
months of the year are entirely 
the parent's responsibility. 

"The problems of educating the 
deaf have been, and will continue 
to be, deserving of our closest at- 
tention." 

. y 

Olaf L. Tollefson, "37, of the 
Georgia School is particularly 
concerned about the spending 
money pupils at the school receive 
from home, or money that is 
earned while on vacation. He 
thinks pupils are too prone to 
look upon money as simply a 
means of letting it sfip through 
their fingers for certain things 
that mere desire craves to possess 
but which often means unneces- 
sary wastefulness. He proposes 
that pupils be taught that wise 
saving and wise spending is the 
best foundation for future in- 
dependence. Righto, Olaf! "Easy 
come, easy go," is an old expres- 
sion. Every pupil should be taught 
the value of money. He should 
be taught that out of every dollar 
received a certain amount should 
be set aside and salted. These 
are days when money seems to 
come in with little effort, and the 
temptation to let it go just as 
readily lays the ioundation for 
difficulties of the future when 
the earning power decreases with 
age. Money that is earned by in- 
dividual effort is appreciated far 
more than if it falls into one's 
lap like a windfall. 

V — 

We regret to learn of the 
passing to the Great Beyond of 
James S. Bowen, known far and 
near as James Speedy Samuel 
Bowen or J. S. S. — March 22, in 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

James was a member of the 
Class of 1897, leaving college in 
his Sophomore year to enter the 
printing trades business. He was 
for a time teacher in the St. Paul 
day school for the deaf He 
leaves a widow, two daughters, 
and a granddaughter. The 
daughter, Mary, graduated from 
the Normal Department of th» 
College in 1927 and is still teach- 
ing in the Minnesota School. 

Among the pall bearers were: 
Louis A. Roth, '97; Peter N. 
Peterson, '98; and J. T. Boat- 
wright, '2 4. 

J. S. S. was an influential 
leader among the deaf in the 
twin cities. His sunny disposi- 
tion attracted to him hosts of 
friends. Possessing natural tal- 
ent as a writer he enjoyed quite 
a reputation as a poet and a 
story teller. His poems showed 
the fire of the soul-poet — some of 
them lifting the reader to cel- 
estial realms. He was a dreamer 
and a doer. Light hearted and 
optimistic, his presence in an 
audience radiated the personality 
of a lovely character. For years 
he regularly wrote for the Com- 
panion under the heading: — 
"Official Reporter." Vale, sweet 
soul — 

"Strong to the end, a man of 

men, from out the strife he 
passed; 

The grandest hour of all his 

life was that of earth the 
last". 
V — 

Delia Kittleson Catuna, '29, 
visiting relatives in State College, 
New Mexico, enjoyed a trip to 
Old Mexico. She reports having 
had a wonderful trip through the 
tropical country and visiting old 



churches and monuments. Her 
husband has been with the Sea- 
bees in the Aleutians for over a 
year. Delia lived on Long Island, 
N. Y., but now her home there is 
rented for a year. During her 
travels she visited her folks in 
Wisconsin. To keep her company 
while hubby is away, she has a 
sweet little daughter. It will be 
remembered that when Kitty, as 
she is known to close friends, was 
a senior at Gallaudet she was 
elected head senior not only be- 
cause of her scholarship record 
but also because of her tact and 
friendliness. This trait, we are 
informed, endures even to this 
day. 

Leonard Lau, '30, of Iowa, but 
now in Washington state, begins 
to recall that he knows how to 
wield a facile pen and therefore 
has promised the editor of the' 
Hawkeye, Norman G. Scarvie, '27, 
material to fill the columns of his 
Alma Maters . publication. 

In the early part of June Leon- 
ard and his good wife (Ethel Kob- 
lenz) contemplate making a trip 
to their old stamping grounds in 
he middle west — and their prom- 
ise to call on the Alumni Editor 
to get acquainted and also, of 
course, to sample his famous cof- 
fee than which, so avers Elwood 
A. Stevenson, N-'ll, and Edith, 
'12, there can be no comparison! 
V— 

Mrs. Florence Phelps Rothert, 
ex-'OO, enjoys her work in a war 
plant at Hawthorne, Calif. We 
are informed that Flo not only 
does highly satisfactory work but 
also her graciousness puts life in- 
to the otherwise monotony of fac- 
tory routine. This attribute has 
lifted her to he honor of being 
as we are reliably informed, "the 
life of the plant." Oldsters on the 
Green will remember Flo as the 
vivacious co-ed who set the hearts 
of the men students afluttering. 
Hubby Waldo, '98, stays home 
and devotes all his time to a Vic- 
tory Garden which he maintains 
throughout the year. 

— — . V 

Cora Denton, '13, is steadily 
employed in Los Angeles. She 
not long ago went up to Eugene, 
Ore., to spend two months with 
her mother. Cora came west 
from Kansas. 

V — 

John E. Staudacher, '88. will 
soon be celebrating his 86 th natal 
day. That's a long journey 
through life — with all its joys and 
sorrows — and yet John is hale 
and hearty, and as the poet said 
— "serene, indifferent of fate." 
Last year he exhibited his rare 
stamp collection in Dubnque, la. 
Of this collection, the Telegraph- 
Herald says: 

"The animal and bird stamp 
display entered in the Tri-State 
Hobby Show by John Staud- 
acher, 421 West Locust St., was 
picked Thursday by the judges as 
the outstanding philatelic exhibit. 

"Mr. Staudacher, 86 years old, 
has been collecting stamps for 
over fifty years. There are 2,200 
stamps in his collection of stamps 
fnom all over the world, each 
bearing the picture of an animal, 
bird or fish." 

The article in the newspaper is 
accompanied by a half tone of 



Compliments 
Glass of '47 



ll|l!l!iC3III!ilii;:.::rj|l!!llllll!l[]||||IIIIIIIIC3llllllllllllC3IIIIIIIIIIIIE3!illlli!ll!![3!iiii;:: 



• ♦ 



f avued-l 




; MET. MOO 

:i!ilC3llll!!lll!!IC3lll!imilllC3IIIIIIIIIIIIC3llillllllll!C3ilil IIC3! miCllllElllllllinilMIIII 



John. Under it is the caption: 
John Staudacher Scores Triumph. 

V 

Last Febraury 4, James M. Ste- 
wart, '9 3, and Hon. '2 4, was hon- 
ored for his long service in the 
profession of teaching the deaf by 
being presented with a scroll by 
the Professional Organization of 
the Michigan School for the Deaf. 
The editor of the Companion says 
of the veteran teacher: 

"A graduate of Gallaudet Col- 
lege, Mr. Stewart served for 47 
years at the Michigan School for 
the Deaf, retiring in 19 39. 
Through his position as a teacher 
and friend of the deaf, Mr. Ste- 
wart was, and still is, a strong 
influence which served to mold 
the character and the education 
of several generations of deaf 
children." 



Says Wesley Lauritsen, '22 and 
33, of that enterprising fellow and 
postmaster on the platform in ad- 
dressing the deaf in the sign 
language — Chester Clark Dobson, 
'31: 

"In order to take care of his 
growing family, Chester C. Dob- 
on has added his name to the long 
list of home owners among the 
Faribault deaf. He has acquired 
a modern six-room home on the 
corner of Sixth avenue and Second 
street, N. E., and will move into 
his palace on June 1. 

V 

Samuel Nichols, '01, has moved 
from Pittsburgh, Pa., to New 
York where he now makes his 
home with a son who is a gradu- 
ate of West Point. He is an in- 



HONOR DR. PEET 



(Continued from page 1) 
of the affair in more ways than 
one. The O. W. L. S. wish to ex- 
press their gratitude to Dr. Hall 
for the use of his home, and to 
the Y W. C. A. for other cour- 
tesies. They also wish to express 
their appreciation to the ladies 
who helped by serving. Without 
all this generous cooperation the 
O. W. L. S. could not have under- 
taken such a social project with 
ease. 



structor along some line in that 
Academy. It is understood that 
Sam has another son and a 
daughter. 

V 

Richard Kennedy, '42, and 
Frank Sullivan, '41, are bona fide 
members of the Lions in Romney, 
W. Va. They find the Order to 
their liking because it enables 
them to mingle with professional 
and business men of influence. 
Up in Devils Lake, N. D., Nicholas 
Braunagel, '27, was recently ini- 
tiated into the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows — 3rd degree. He 
scays he and his wife enjoy the 
social life that has been opened 
up to them and that he finds his 
memership in the Order helpful 
in other ways. That's the right 
thing to do — join hearing organi- 
zations for the many advantages 
they offer. At the same time, of 
course, the deaf should not pass 
up their own organizations, such 
as the National Association of 
the Deaf and the national Frater- 
nal Society of the Deaf. 



GALLAUDET COLLEGE 

Senior Class Year Book 
DEDICATED TO 

Professor Frederick H. Hughes 

Profusely illustrated with Pictures of the 
College and Student Activities 

Send your $1.50 to — 

*7&e *7au*e* Clock 

Miss Julia Burg, Circulation Mgr. 
Gallaudet College, Washington 2, D.C. 

Enclosed find $ for copy of 

The Tower Clock. Please send to — 

Name 

Address 



Woodward & Lothrop 



11 & F St., N. W. 



Smalt SpSiitUf, 9+toje<itme#it&- 



Count on each of them for many happy returns 
on the price you pay. One skirt plus three 
blouses or sweaters cab equal three costumes — 
and Woodward & Lothrop has the sort of 
separate skirts your favorite blouses need . . . 
casual affairs. . . . tailorer skirts — afternoon 
skirts, with dressmaker detail. Team them 

with separate jackets and seem to have a host 
of suits. Only you will ever know how large 
a share in your change-about wardrobe a single 
separate skirt plays. Choose yours on misses' 
sizes from our collection of sportswear. 



Farewell 

Seniors! 



THE 



Volume LII, Number 12 




Farewell 
Seniors ! 



GALLAUDET COLLEGE, KENDALL UliEEN WASHINGTON. D. C 



Eighteen Seniors To Receive 
ieior Degrees June 3 



Tuesday, May 80, 194-i 



Four Honorary Degrees Are 
I o Be Conferred 



Eighteen Bachelor's degrees, 
four Master of Art degrees, one 
Master of Science degree and two 
higher honorary degrees will be 
conferred by Dr. Percival Hall at 
the eightieth commencement ex- 
ercises of Gallaudet College on 
Saturday afternoon, June 3, at 
4 o'clock in Chapel Hall. 

Assisting with the graduation 
exercises will be Mr. Robert L. 
Haycock, Superintendent of 
Schools in the District of Colum- 
bia. Mr. Haycock will deliver 
the graduation address and the 
Rev. Otto Berg - , '38, minister for 
the deaf, will give the invocation 
and the closing benediction. Miss 
Caroline Tillinghast will be Vale- 
dictorian. Mr. Thomas Berg will 
give an oration 

Candidates for the Bachelor of 
Science degree are: Thomas Berg, 
Wash.; Leander Moore, Fla.; 
Meyer Plotitsky, N. Y.; Virgie 
Bourgeois, La.; Julia Burg, N. J.; 
Malvine Fischer, N. Y.; Roberta 
Herrmann, Penn.; June King, N. 
Y.; Frances Lupo, N. Y.; Caro- 
line Tillinghast, Fla.; Frances 
Todd, Fla.; Mary Sladek, Calif.; 
Clarice Petrick, Mont. ; and Arlene 
Stecker, Conn. 

Candidates for the Bachelor 
of Arts degree are: Paul Bald- 
ridge, Utah; Leonard Meyer, Mo.; 
Charles Pollock, S. C.; and Ber- 
tram Lependorf, N. Y. 

Those to receive the Master of 
Arts degree in the Normal Class 
are: Cornelius P. Goetzinger, 
Washington University; Irene 
A. Palagi, College of Great Falls; 
Orpha Arlene Thompson, Univer- 
sity of North Dakota. 

An honorary Master of Arts de- 
gree will be conferred on Joseph- 
ine Quinn of the faculty of the 
Minnesota School for the Deaf, a 
teacher of long experience and 
successful accomplishments in the 
education of the deaf. An honor- 
ary Master of Science degree will 
be conferred on Thomas W. Os- 
borne, chemist in the employe of 
the Firestone Tire and Rubber 
Co., Akron, O. 

President Hall has also been 
authorized to confer an honorary 
degree of Doctor of Humane Let- 
ters en Henry A. Perkins, Pres- 
dent of the Board of Directors of 
the American. School for the Deaf 
at West Hartford, Conn., and an 
honorary degree of Doctor of 
Letters on Harry F. Best, of the 
faculty of the University of Ken- 
tucky and author of Deafness and 
the Deaf of the United States. 

Immediately after the exercises 
there will be a reception in honor 
of the graduates at the home of 
Dr. and Mrs. Hall. 

Dr. Lucius Clark, former chan- 
cellor of American University, 
rendered the baccalaureate serv- 
ices in the college chapel at 5 
p.m., Sunday, May 28. 

V 

Y. W. C A. Holds 

Lawn Party 



Under the auspices of the 
Y.W.C.A., a semi-formal lawn 
party was held on Kendall Green, 
Sunday, May 14. An annual affair, 
the party this year was somewhat 
different from those held in pre- 
vious years. Instead of being 
served on the chapel terrace, as 
customarily, the guests sat in a 
semi-circle on the tree shaded 
lawn near Fowler Hall. Fruit 
punch and cookies were served 
by Dr. Peet, Caroline Tillinghast 
and Julia Burg. Thus the occa- 
sion was rendered more unique 
with the serving. The guests con- 
sisted of many of the faculty and 
their families, several outside 
friends and a number of men and 
women students. 

(Continued on page 4) 



Fraternity Sponsors 
Annual Dance 



D. C. Features 
Junior Miss' 



Smash Broadway Hit Draws 
Large Attendance 



All the lights of towering New 
York pierced through and over 
the banisters of the sky scraper 
roof, into which Old Jim war, con- 
verted to hold the throngs of for- 
mally attired couples attending 
the annual Kappa Gamma Frater- 
nity dance on the evening of May 
13 from 9 o'clock to 1 o'clock 
p.m. 

Entering the gym and passing 
the shrine of the fraternity at the 
head of the stairway, the roman- 
tic co-eds and their escorts found 
themselves gazing at the Statue 
of Liberty and a quarter moon far 
off over New York Harbor, while 
on either side were the silhouetted 
sky scrapers with countless dimly 
glowing windows. At the eastern 
end of the room was a large awn- 
ing under which were ferns sur- 
rounding the orchestra. 

Low overhead was a nicely 
proportioned network of blue and 
gold crepe with an occasional 
twinkling star. The light shades 
afforded rays only through scat- 
tered gold crepe stars. Large 
ferns dotting the roof edge gave 
the dancers a touch of a cool blue 
starlit night. A five-piece orches- 
tra provided suitable strains for 
the occasion. At intermission re- 
freshments of punch and cookies 
were served on the ledge around 
the swimming pool which was sur- 
rounded by ferns. At the bottom 
of the pool was a large skull pat- 
tern laid -in stone rendered twink- 
ly by the dancing clear water. 

Gracing the receiving line were 
Mr. and Mrs. English Sullivan, 
Miss Margaret Hatch and Grand 
Rajah Paul Baldridge. 

There was a minimum admis- 
sion charge this year, proceeds 
of which will go to aid the fourth 
scholarship fund drive started 
by the Fraternity. 



New Buff and Blue 
Staff Elected 



G.CW.A.A. Holds 
Annual Banquet 

Honor Mrs. Temple 
With Farewell Gift 



Once again, after a one year's 
vacation, the Dramatic Club rose 
to the top of the deaf entertain- 
ment world with a superb ren- 
dition of that smash Broadway 
hit "Junior Miss." Before an en- 
tranced audience, on May 20, 
the curtain rose in Chapel Hall 
to reveal a cast whose inspired 
acting made that night one to be 
remembered. 

The play centers around Judy 
Graves, Agnes Minor, '47, who 
has, to put it mildly, a vivid im- 
agination. Judy thinks her father, 
Harry Graves, Paul Baldridge, 
'44, is in love with Ellen, Mar- 
jorie Case, '46, daughter of J. B. 
Curtis, Ralph White, '46, her 
father's boss. With the help of 
Fuffy Adams, Malvine Fischer, 
'44, her bosom pal, Judy schemes 
to "save" her father. Just at this 
moment, Uncle Willis Reynolds, 
Mervin Garretson, '47, appears. 
Judy, because of his long absence 
imagines him to be a jailbird. 
She introduces him to Ellen, they 
marry, and Judy believes all is 
well. Unfortunately, as a result 
of this marriage, Judy's father 
loses his job. After many com- 
plications, Harry Graves gets bet- 
ter work, and all is well. 

Supporting roles were in the 
able hands of: Marvin, Marshall, ^ 
'47; Julia Burg, '44; Mary Sladek, 
'44; Arlene Stecker, '44; Thomas 
Rippe, '4 6; Roy Sperry, '4 6; 
Leonard Meyer, '44; Lyle Mor- 
tensen, '4 8; Jack Hensley, '45; 
Frank Sladek, '46; Chas. Pollock, 
'44; Burton Schmidt, '48; Jason 
Ammons, '47. 

Director of the play was the 
one and only Prof. F. H. Hughes. 
Leander Moore, '44, as stage 
manager with his assistant, 
Frank Sladek, created the beau- 
tiful set. Mrs. Lorraine Kline, 
Prof. Percival Hall, Jr., Prof. 
McClure and Mrs. Frederick 
Hughes also helped in various 
capacities. The officers of the 
Dramatic Club and their assis- 
tants did their share in making 
the play a success as well. 



The girls' refectory was the 
scene of the annual G. C. W. A. 
A. banquet which was held on 
Friday May 19 at 6 p. m. Vases 
of red roses adorned the snowy 
white table cloths. The co-eds 
and the women .members of the 
faculty in their lovely formals 
added a rainbow effect to the 
room. 

In spite of war-time conditions, 
a delicious menu was prepared by 
Mrs. Troupe with the main bill 
of fare being southern fried 
chicken and other delicacies. 

President Julia Burg, '44 pre- 
sided as toastmistress for the 
evening with Mrs. Kenneth Tem- 
ple as guest speaker, who ren- 
dered an interesting talk on 
"Physical Fitness." Malvine 
Fischer, '4 4, as Senior speaker 
spoke on "As They like It." A 
monologue termed "Body Beau- 
tiful" was enacted by Abigail 
Yowell, P. C. Marjoriebelle Stak- 
ley, '47, rendered a poem "Team 
Work," written by Edgar Guest. 

This was followed by presen- 
tation of awards to the girls who 
did outstanding work in the vari- 
ous tournaments by Dr. Percival 
Hall. For Fencing: First place, 
Julia Burg, '44; second. Linette 
Freret, '47 and third, Celia Burg, 
'45. For the individual members 
of the swimming meet: First 
place, Hester Parsons, '47; sec- 
ond, Frances Parsons, P. C; 
third, tie between Malvine Fisch- 
er, '44 and Norma Bushey, '47. 

Mrs. Craig presented awards 
for badminton. First place, Lin- 
ette Freret, '47; second, Norma 
Bushey, '47; third, Celia Burg, 
'45. Also for archery, first place, 
Marjorie Case, '46; second, Mar- 
garet Clack, '46, third, tie be- 
tween Clarice Petrick, '4 4 and 
Arlene Stecker, '44. 

Mrs. Kline presented awards 
for: Ping Pong, first place, Celia 
Burg, '45; second place, Clar- 
helen Wilkins, '45; third, Julia 
Burg, '44. Tennis, first place, 
Julia Burg, '4 4; second, Celia 
(Continued on page 4) 



Lyle A. Wiltse was chosen to 
steer the Buff and Blue through 
the coming year as Editor-in- 
Chief at a recent meeting of the 
Board. Mr. Wiltse has been con- 
nected with the Buff and Blue for 
three years, and we are convinced 
he will turn in a creditable per- 
formance in his new office. W. 
S. Runde, '01, will continue as 
Alumni Editor. 

Other members of the staff are 
to be: Robert Panara, '45, Lit- 
erary Editor; Earl Elkins, '46, 
News Editor; Eugene Schick, '47, 
Sports Editor; Keith Lange, '47, 
and Gertrude Slattery, '4 6, As- 
sistant Sports Editors; Earline 
Becker, '47, Ruby Miller, '47, 
John Murphy, P. C, Lawrence 
Newman, '48, Associate Editors. 
The reporters will be Herbert 
Goodwin, '48, Jerry Jordan, '48, 
Pauline Hamlin, '48, Barbara 
Myer, '47, Ernest Schuster, '47, 
Fred Yates, '48, and Audrey 
Watson, '48. Harold Steinman, 
'46, was elected Business Man- 
ager, and Frank Sladek, '46, As- 
sistant Business Manager; War- 
ren Blackwell, '4 6, Circulation 
Manager; Wayne Schleiff, '48, 
Advertising Manager; Nadine 
Nichols, '46, and Dewey Samples, 
'46, Assistant Advertising Man- 
agers; Betty Jo Raines, '46, 
Proofreader. The auditors will 
be: Prof. H. D. Drake, Harold 
Steinman and Wayne Schleiff. Six 
experienced printers were chosen. 
They are Jason Ammons, '47, 
William Brightwell, '46, Wayne 
Furlong, '46, Eugene Schick, '47, 
Burton Schmidt, '48, and Donald 
! Wilkinson, '45. 



Coach Sullivan Called For Active Duty 



.ommissione 



d E 



nsign 



The readers of the Buff and 
Blue have undoubtedly become 
familiar with the name of Gal- 
laudet's present Coach and Phy- 
sical Education Director, English 
Sullivan and his victorious head- 
lines gracing the sports page. 

James English Sullivan, N., '39, 
graduated from Centre College at 
Danville, Ky., in 1936. Shortly 
afterwards he became bookkeeper 
in the Superintendent's office at 
the Kentucky School for the Deaf, 
a position he held for two years. 
Being encouraged by Supt. Lee of 
that School, he entered Gallaudet 
College as a Normal Fellow in 
19 38-39. The following year he 
became teacher and athletic direc- 
tor at the Kendall School. While 
there he showed such ability at 
coaching the Kendall basketball 
squad that he was chosen to be- 
come coach and physical director 
at Gallaudet College in 1941-42. 

During his three years of coach- 
ing the Blue Bisons, the Gallaudet 
boys have been champions four 
times. In 1942 they won the 
Mason-D ixon Cross Country 
Championship and the Mason- 
Dixon Basketball Championship 
in the 1943 Conference. Again 
this year Coach Sully put his 
track squads in the winning 
streak by copping the South At- 
lantic Cross-Country Run last 
fall and the Mason-Dixon Track 
and Field Meet this spring. This 
makes four trophies in two years. 
a job that deserves great praise. 



Coach Sullivan left Kendall 
Green on May 22, and shortly 
afterwards will enter the Navy 
as a commissioned officer, Ensign. 
He will be the second member of 
the Gallaudet College Faculty to 
enter the armed services. Miss 
Benson is in the W. A. C. S. 

The men of the college faculty 
gave a farewell luncheon in honor 
of Coach Sullivan at the Dodge 
Hotel, May 15. They also present- 
ed him with a leather photo- 
graph album in order that he 
may take along with him pictures 
of his. wife and the two children. 
A sum of money was presented to 
him along with other gifts. 

Following is a letter of con- 
gratulations from the Head of 
the Physical Education Associa- 
tion of the District of Columbia. 

"Dear Sully, 

"Congratulations to you on a 
job well-done. I was very happy 
to see you complete your trio of 
championships by winning the 
Mason-Dixon Track and Field 
Meet last week-end. 

"The best wishes of the high- 
school coaches go with you as you 
leave the rank of athletic men 
for the duration. Please remem- 
ber us often and think kindly of 
us once in a while. 

"Best of luck to you in your 
new position. 

"Sincerely, 

(Signed) "J. Dallas Shirley" 

The students and faculty mem- 
bers are sorry to see Coach and 
Mrs. Sullivan and their children 
leave the Green. We extend to 
them our very best wishes. 



G.CAA Banquet Highlights 
Successful Sports Season 



Dramatics Class 



Gi 



ives 



* j 



lay 



By popular demand, the comic 
opera "Pirates of Penzance" was 
brought to the stage a second 
time by the Class in Dramatics 
on May 8 in Chapel Hall. In a 
respective mood, a large audience 
watched Prof. Hughes' charges 
strut through their paces. This 
act showed a great improvement 
over the first presentation. The 
signs were more clear, responses 
more accurately timed and the 
characters' portrayal was better. 
As a preliminary to the "Pirates 
of Penzance," a farcial comedy, 
'Come Out of It" was given. The 
story, as usual, was built up 
against a background of love. 
Three young members of the 
Long family, Sarah by Jean 
Smith, '46; Ben by Ralph White, 
'46, and Sylvia by Marilyn Hugh- 
es, '4 6, are the main characters. 
Sylvia adores Harold Gately por- 
trayed by Jack Hensley, '45, who 
is a young man with a passion for 
hypnotism. Sylvia, with Ben and 
his sweetheart, Ruth Staley, Car- 
lie Todd, '44, plot to cure Harold 
of his fixed idea. Harold, after 
failing in an attempt to make 
Luscious, a negro maid portrayed 
by Virgie Bourgeois, '44, think 
that she is a butterfly, wants to 
practice his art on Sylvia. She re- 
fuses to let him do it on her 
alone, so Harold tries to make 
Sylvia, Ben and Ruth think they 
are pirates. This experiment fails 
too, Harold being overpowered 
and blindfolded, and the con- 
spirators leave. A burglar, Roy 
Sperry, '46, driving all including 
Sarah and John Blunt, Warren 
Blackwell, '4 6, back into the 
room proceeds to rob them. In 
doing so, he awakens Harold who 
hypnotizes him and forces him to 

(Continued on page 4) 
V 

Dr. Hall Presents 
Scholarship Awards 

After the Wednesday Chapel 
services, April 19, Dr. Percival 
Hall presented the annual O.W. 
L.S. scholarship awards to the 
following sorority members: Clar- 
helen Wilkins of the Junior class, 
Margaret Clack of the Sophomore 
class, and Earline Becker of the 
Freshman class. 

The O.W.L.S. scholarships are 
presented twice annually from 
funds raised through the alum- 
nae O. W. L. S. They are distrib- 
uted to a sorority member of 
each class as a tribute to their 
outstanding scholastic record In 
classroom work according to Dr. 
Elizabeth Peet, chairman of the 
scholastic committee. 

Dr. Hall then presented the 
Olof Hanson Service Award to 
Paul Baldridge, and the Ely 
Prize for Excellence in Scholar- 
ship to Frances Lupo. Both stu- 
dents are Seniors. Mr. Baldridge 
has done much this year in both 
class and social activities. He is 
Grand Rajah of the Kappa Gam- 
ma Fraternity and President of 
the Dramatic Club. In addition to 
this he is also co-editor of the 
Tower Clock. Miss Lupo, not to 
be outdone, is constantly con- 
cerned with women's social ac- 
tivities as President of the Y. 
W. C. A. These two seniors 
have contributed much time and 
effort to the student body and 
since these two awards are 
presented for leadership and 
character abilities, we consider 
them justly rewarded for their 
efforts. 

Meyer Plotitsky, '44, and Thom- 
as O. Berg, '44, shared the Dr. 
Charles R. Ely annual chemistry 
prize for their outstanding work 
in chemistry. 



"G" Awards, Certificates 
Presented to Lettermen 



Holding their annual banquet 
April 14, the members of the G. 
C. A. A. met in the men's refec- 
tory where a delicious meal was 
served with all the splendor of 
pre-war days. 

Speakers for the evening were: 
Prof. H. D. Drake, who gave the 
invocation, Charles Pollock, '44, 
Toast-master; Dr. Percival Hall, 
Mr. Craig E. Taylor, sports writer 
for the Baltimore Sun and Mr. 
Joseph Mitchell, one of the Dis- 
trict's leading basketball officials 
who related a brief history of 
basketball. 

Coach J. E. Sullivan then took 
the floor, and, after a brief talk 
in which he lauded the efforts of 
the Cross Country team, present- 
ed "G" awards to the following 
young men: Rudolph Hines, '47; 
Robert Stanley, '47; Thomas Fish- 
ier, '47; Mervin Garretson, '47; 
Marvin Marshall, '47; and Cecil 
Alms, '46. Keith Lange, '47, was 
presented with an award for his 
efforts as manager of the team. 
Certificates of Special Honorable 
Mention were presented to Her- 
bert Goodwin and John Kubis of 
the Preparatory Class. Myron Lee 
and Malcolm Norwood also of the 
"Prep" Class were presented with 
Honorable Mention certificates. 
Coach Sullivan also presented cer- 
tificates to Robert Stanley, '47; 
Marvin Marshall, '47; and Her- 
bert Goodwin, P. C. 

Basketball "G" awards were 
presented to the following young 
men by Graduate Manager Wil- 
liam J. McClure: Paul Baldridge, 
'44; Donald Padden, '45; Roy Hol- 
comb, '47; Edmund Witczak, '46; 
and Thomas Fishier, '47. Special 
Honorable Mention certificates 
were presented to Leslie Massey, 
Wayne Schleiff and Lyle Morten- 
sen, all of the Preparatory Class. 
Certificates of Honorable Mention 
were presented to Robert Stanley, 
'47; Jason Ammons, '47; Law- 
rence Leitson, P. C; Wilbur Ruge, 
P. C; Joseph Broz, P. C; and 
Herbert Goodwin, P. C. 

Following the presentation of 
awards, Leander Moore, '44, gave 
a humorous account of "Casey at 
the Bat" in the sign language. 
After Mr. Pollock had expressed 
our appreciation to the speakers 
of the evening, the meeting was 
brought to a close. 

Much thanks is due to the com- 
mittee in charge of the banquet, 
which was composed of Prof. Wal- 
ter J. Krug Advisor; Thomas 
Berg, '44, Chairman; Robert 
Panara, '45; Frank Sladek '46; 
Marvin Marshall, '47; and Burton 
Schmidt, P. C, Head Waiter. 
Thanks must also be extended to 
Mrs. Troupe and Mr. Johnson who 
both went far out of their line 
of duty to help make the banquet 
a successful and enjoyable one. 
V 

Ayers and Stark, 
Head Seniors 



In order that smooth sailing 
may be attained as regards activi- 
ties for the student body for the 
forthcoming year, Willis Ayers, 
'45, and Betty Stark, '45, were 
elected Head Seniors of the men 
and women, respectively. Their 
recent appointment is subject to 
the approval of the Faculty. The 
assisting Head Juniors chosen to 
aid the Head Seniors were Ralph 
White, '46, for the men; Ger- 
trude Slattery, '46, and Nadine 
Nichols, '46, for the women. The 
new members will fill the vacan- 
cies left by graduating Head 
Seniors, Leonard Meyer and 
Frances Todd. Both Mr. Ayers 
and Miss Stark are graduates of 
the Kansas School for the Deaf. 



PAGE TWO 



The Buff and Blue 



Tuesday, May 30, 1944 



T)ie Buff and Blue 

Published once a month during October, De- 
cember, iApril and twice a month during Novem- 
ber, January, February, March and May. Entered 
at the Post Office at Washington as second-class 
mail matter. 

Subscription Price ?2.00 per year 

(Payable in advance) 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Malvine Fischer, '44 

LITERARY EDITOR Bertt Dependorf, '44 

NEWS EDITOR Byron Hunziker, '46 

SPORTS EDITOR . .-_ Lyle A. Wiltse, '4 6 

ASS'T SPORTS ED Clarhelen Wilkins, '45 

ALUMNI EDITOR Winfield S. Runde, '01 

ASSOCIATES 
Robert Tanara, '45 Earl Elkins, '46 

Christel Erdmann, '46 

REPORTERS and COLUMNISTS 

Caroline Tillinghast, ".4 Carlie Todd, '44 
John Randolph, '45 Calvin George, '45 

Uetty-Jo Raines, '4 6 Jean Smith, '4 6 

Ralph White, '4 6 Nadine Nichols, '4 6 

Earline Becker, '47 Thomas Fishier, '47 

Mervin Garretson, '4 7 

BUSINESS MANAGER Calv.n George, '45 

ASS'T BUSINESS MANAGER . Donald Padden, '4 5 
CIRCULATION MANAGER . Harold Steinman, '4 6 
ADVERTISING MANAGER . . Charles Pollock, '44 

ASS'T ADV. MANAGERS . Frank Sladek, '4 6 

Wayne Schlieff, P. C. 

PRINTERS 
Leonard J. Meyer, '44, FOREMAN 
William Brightwell, '4 6 Jason Amnions, '47 
Bertt Lependorf, '44 Wayne Furlong, '46 

Charles Pollock, '44 



VALE, SENIORS! 

As the final issue of the Buff and Blue goes 
to press, we find another group of young men 
and women about to take leave of Kendall Green 
after five years in quest of a higher education. 
The time and the occasion deems it very fitting 
and proper to say a few words in honor of them 

_ _ our departing Seniors. Perched pre- 
cariously on the threshold of the outer world, 
they are about to step away and prove their 
mettle as worthwhile American citizens. Their 
sojourn on the Green has, perhaps, seemed com- 
paratively brief to some of them, while others 
feel it is time to depart. Some have had enough 
of book learning, but all will leave, not without 
a tinge of wistfulness at the thought of leaving 
this haven of placid existence and cheerful 
friendliness. They are much better prepared 
to meet and cope with the problems of life than 
when they first entered college. With "So 
Little Time" left they will gradually come to 
a gentle halt and take an inventory of things, 
on past events. Now, on the spur of the moment, 
(hey realize the value of the education they have 
received, the wondrous opportunity that has 
been theirs to hold. Assuredly, what benefits 
they have received from these five years at Gal- 
laudet will have its value in direct proportion 
to the amount of effort put forth by each indi- 
vidual, whether time was used roisterously with 
a minimum of scholastic effort, or wisely to ad- 
vantage. Time used rightly and sanely is an 
asset. Time squandered foolishly in aimless 
dilly-dallying is a total loss, for those fleeting 
hours can never be recalled. It is sincerely 
hoped that there will be little cause for regret 
of any sort among our outgoing Seniors aside 
from that of leaving behind the quaint old ivy- 
covered buildings, the rolling green acres with 
its multitude of blossoming flowers and shrub- 
bery, and most of all, old friends, tried and true. 
It is the friends whom they are about to bi 
adieu that taxes the heart strings most, friends 
and classmates who have worked their way 
through thick and thin together, enjoyed life 
to its fullest in wholesome companionship. New 
friends are to be found, but the old have a hal- 
lowed place in their hearts. Such is the way of 
the world, with which all mankind must reckon 
in due time. We may be justly proud of our 
Seniors who have accomplished much in "So 
Little Time," who have set themselves as shin- 
ing examples for future students to look up to 
and to follow. Do not lose heart, however, for 
others have gone before you and have succeeded. 
Let your Alma Mater be your protecting shield 
and guiding star. To you who are about to ven- 
1 ure into the mill stream of Life, we bid a fond 
farewell and bon voyage. GOOD LUCK! 

L. A. W. 



As We See It 

Jean Smith, '46 



u,Ml!liiinilllllllllllillll!lllllllli;H 

As the members of the Class of '44 make ready 
to be graduated we look at them ana wonder what 
Is in store for them beyond the gates of their 
Alma Mater. We can visualize each of them doing 
a certain thing. Then we remember the condition 
of today's world, and immediately start putting 
each person in some }ob made vacant by the draft, 
and argue whether or not it will be permanent. 

One advantage of jobs made possible by the war 
is the high wages. One feels that because of the 
labor shortage he can demand his own price. This, 
in some cases, is true; but there are many other 
people who may be willing to work for a little less, 
and so the jobs go to them. 

Since there is such a demand for workers to re- 
lease men for active combat, some may be tempted 
to step into the first offer without further ven- 
ture. Then when the war is over, and those men 
return, it will be the same old story "Terribly sorry 
...your services are no longer needed .. .good 
worker, but. . .." for the duration workers. 

On the other hand, some woreters may make 
such a good impression on their employer that 
they will become indispensable and will have their 
jobs for as long as they want them. 

Some graduates may choose to enter a Univer- 
sity to continue their studies in a certain line, for 
which they may be an essentiality in the post-war 
world. Others may start teaching in some School 
for the Deaf, where, if they prove capable, they are 
likely to remain as long as they so desire. 

It is a well-known fact that the possibilities of 
a graduate securing a job now are better that 
they were in pre-war days. The possibilities of 
keeping the job, however, are much the same; de- 
pending upon his ability and effort, and the will 
to win. 



(7 



The Hurdy Gurdy 

Nadine Nichols, '46 & John Randolph, '45 



When the RCAF softball team came to play, 50 
percent of the Fowler Hallites went to witness the 
game for other reasons than softball. . .The chapel 
steps have been deserted for cooler, more roman- 
tic spots on the campus ... By the way Mouty, are 
you wearing that yellow sweater to catch Celia's 
eye? 

And people we'd like to know oetter If we had 
the chance: Hines. . .Orchids to the gentlemanly 
Kentuckian who gallantly aided Mrs. Troup out 
of the car . . . Onions to the non-Kentuckians who 
didn't. . .We certainly like Wharton, don't we 
Chickie? Ask Major-G-eneral Sperry where his red, 
red nose done disappeared . . . Schick's K. G-. pin is 
missing, finder needn't bother to return it. . .In-a- 
word description of some people who think they 
are, but aren't. . . inflooeyental . .. Sun addicts are 
getting dopey from overly nice weather, lately 
. . Brightwell is champ of the key-chain twirlers . . 
Cal James surely has a Case of it. 

Hal said that Jamieson looked like Cleopatra 
a la mode in his pretty yellow satin, shorts and 
dirty sweat shirt reclining on the soft green of 
Hotchkiss field. 

In the spring when a young man's fancy 
lightly turns to thoughts of love, it is extremely 
dangerous to forget to bribe the girl friend's kid 
brother. For further details . . . see Hirte. 

What is it Lange has that we other guys have 
not? He keeps on receiving K.O.B.'s from a cer- 
tain young lady whose name he won't divulge, 
which leaves his suddenly grinning face a mottled 
red. 

Imagine our beloved Head Senior, Meyer, leav- 
ing the shower running! Was it 'only yesterday 
that he "preached" water conservation? Oh well, 
even a head senior doesn't necessarily have to be 
immune to spring fever. 

Quoting one of Erdmann's English Composi- 
tions, "... one of my teeth fell out and never 
returned." We wonder if they ever return? And 
there was a Freshman Biology student who wrote 
that the chief difference between, two biological 
terms is that they aren't spelled alike. He didn't 
get credit for the answer, but he still swears he 
wasn't wrong. 

BumnniiinnmiiiminiiuuHuiHiininiiiiwuiuiimiiniitiiwiimnnniiiiiimiiiifliiHiii!!^ 

Reader's Dri-Jest | 

Caroline Tillinghast, '44 



A young American pilot, just back from 'over- 
sea duty, got a 30-day furlough. He came home 
and within two weeks had his chickens trained 
to fly into the kitchen, dive over the stove, and 
drop three eggs in the frying pan. 

Jr. Scholastic 

*□ * 
Soldiers at Camp Davis, N. C, really believed 
in obeying orders. A detail of eight men was told 
to move the library books from the upper floor 
of the old library to the main floor 'of the new 
club. They did. All but one book. The title was: 
"You Can't Take It With You". 



Hatch: Did you ever hear the story about the 
red-hot coal? 
Depew: No. 
Hatch: Well, you couldn't grasp it. 

— Palmetto and Pine. 

* D * 

Junior: Will you give 10 cents to help the 
Old Ladies' Home? 

Soph: What, are they out again? 

* □ X 

Julia: George called the house four times 
before I gave him a date. 

Celia: Whom did he ask for the first three 
times? 

Grocer: Have you been to the Zoo? 
New Errand Boy: No, sir. 

Grocer: Well, you ought to go sometime, you'd 
get a big kick out of watching the turtles zip past. 

Iowa Hawkeye 

A mule was lost in a simall village, so quite a 
few of the people turned out to hunt for it. As it 
turned out, the village nit-wit finally brought in 
the strayed animal. 

"How did you come to find it?" he was asked. 

"Waal," he drawled, "I thought to myself: 
'Where'd I go if I was a mule?' and I went there 
and there he was." 

Iowa Hawkeye 

A Scot was engaged in an argument with a con- 
ductor as to whether his fare was 25 cents or 30 
cents. Finally the disgusted conductor threw the 
Scot's suitcase out the window of the train as they 
passed over a river. 

"Mon!" screamed the Scot. "It isn't enough to 
overcharge me, but now you try to drown my little 
boy." 

* n * 

Little Joey: Half a pound of potatoes with 
eyes, please. 

Grocer: Why with eyes? 

Little Joey: Mother says they'll have to se- 
us through the week. 

That's all that gives; there ain't no more. 
We wish that you won't not get sore w 
If more to write wc had, we would; 
But since no got, we cannot could. 

— Virginia Tech 

The trainer was putting his performing dogs 
through their routine while a vaudeville agent 
watched, utterly bored. At the finish, the little 
dog piped up: 

"Well, pal, how's about booking us?" 

"Goodness," exclaimed the agent, electrified. 
"You don't mean the little dog is talking!" 

"Of course not," said the trainer, simply, "the 
big dog's a ventriloquist." 

Small Marie, sitting on her grandfather's knee, 
after looking intently at his grizzled face and long 
white beard, asked him if he were in Noah's ark. 

"Certainly not," replied Grandpa. "What makes 
you ask that?" 

"Well, then, why weren't you drowned?" con- 
tinued the little girl. 

An Old Maid's Prayer 

O, Lord, I am not asking for myself, but for 
my mother. Pray, do give her a son-in-law. Amen. 

Did you ever stop to think what would have 
happened to the American forces at Bunker Hill 
if all the British soldiers had had bloodshot eyes? 

Tower 

Insurance man questioning a cowboy: Ever have 
any accidents? 
Cowboy: Nope 

Insurance man: Never? In all your life? 
Cowboy: Well, a rattler bit me once. 
Insurance man: Don't you call that an accident? 
cident? 
Cowboy: Gosh, no. He bit me on purpose! 

* q * 

Petting has been prohibited in an Ohio ceme- 
tery. Probably after grave consideration. 

Frank: Do you know who the first engineer 
was? 

Arlene: No, who? 

Frank: Adam, he furnished the parts for the 
first loudspeaker. 

Professor Sullivan: What did you find out 
about the salivary glands? 

Stiffler: I couldn't find out a thing, professor. 
They're too darn secretive. 

Wesleyan Pharos 

He (a diner in one of our rationed restau- 
rants): My plate is damp. 

She (his wife): Hush, that's your soup. 
Tower 

Nertzery Rhymes 

A tutor who tooted the flute 
Tried to tutor two tutors to to'o. 
Said the two to the tutor: 
"Is it harder to toot or 
To tutor two tutors to toot?" 



^IllillllllilllllllllllllllllllliliOII'IIIW 



( Campus Chatter ( 

I Betty-Jo Raines, '46 & Ralph White, '46 | 



sumii 

A wedding shower was given by the women 
faculty members, April 30, in honor of Miss Ade- 
laide Keller. Miss Keller was our former mechan- 
ical drawing instructor and clothing teacher. The 
engagement was announced recently, but as to 
date, the time the bells will ring has not been set. 
The couple received many useful gifts, and we 
wish them both the best of luck. 

Mrs. Sam Stakley was the guest of her daugh- 
ter, Marjoriebell, '4 7, during the week-end of 
April 2 3. Mrs. Stakley had just purchased her first 
airplane ticket home when the weather bureau 
interfered with her plans. She had to catch the 
early train home in order to arrive in time to 
work Monday morning. Marjoriebell reports that 
she was fifteen minutes late, and we wonder what 
the boss had to say. 

A six-pound baby boy was the gift to Mr. and 
Mrs. Earl Roberts, Jr., on April 30. Mr. Roberts 
was graduated last year and took Miss Ruth Be- 
noit, ex-'45, into his house to do the dishes. Con- 
gratulations to the proud parents. Hopes are that 
Earl III will be as good a basketball player as his 
father. 

Hazel White of Portsmouth, Virginia, paid the 
Kentuckians a visit recently. From the look on 
their faces, they certainly hated to see her leave. 

Directly after the superintendents and princi- 
pals had their convention in Pittsburg, the Mis- 
souri students had the pleasure of showing the 
others what a fine superintendent they had In Tru- 
man L. Ingle. He remained until the following 
Monday afternoon. 

Ralph White, '4 6, was the preacher at the Cal- 
vary Baptist Church, Sunday, March 7. His ser- 
mon was entitled, "Youth — the Hope of the 
World." We wonder how many of the audience 
he put to sleep. 

By the way, haven't you noticed the new faces 
on the campus lately? Blame it on the sun, so 
they say! It is hard to tell Riddy and Woody apart 
since they burned up their beautiful milk-white 
complexions. Billy Brightwell is no exception, for 
from a distance, it really is hard to tell which race 
he belongs to — black or white! 



The Poet's Pack 

Contributions Made by the Student Body 



BHtD SONG 

Oh, wilding creatures, birds that soar the skies; 
Wind-swept birds that float with flawless balance 
Birds that usher in the sun's new rise. 
And are innocent and chaste of earthly malice. 
Oh, I wish I were so fiercely wild and free, 
My heart would quake at humankind endeavor 
To be my friend. I would in terror flee, 
And climb the sky forever and forever. 

— Ruby Miller, '47 

BAJIE BRANCHES / 

Vou look so barren, you majestic oak, 

For winter has left you devoid of your dress. 

But spring will come, and lay a lovely cloak 
Upon your broad shoulders, and then one shan't 
guess 

That you were lacking in loftiest splendor 

As you gaze from your towering height to th ■* 
earth; 

And 'ere the great heav'n flings wide its huge 
door, 

You will blossom and bloom with the refresh- 
ing dirth. 

No longer will passers-by, pausing below 

Your outspreading branches, so bleak and so 
bare, 
Heave sighs of relentless pity, but show 
The radiance and beauty they find in you, 
there. 

Because Nature's wonders, sure-healing, prove 
balm 
Not only to sympathy we express for you, 
But also for our own outlets of pity; and calm, 
Deep consolence, happiness, steals over us, too. 
Christel Erdmann, '46 

MOTHER (THE GODDESS OF OUR HEARTS) 

From bosom sons to stately men, 

Good one's are mighty few. 

Yet always with the Mother's love, 

They begin their life anew. 

i 
Why should we with all our pride 

Forget her loving cares. 

When she will always be at our side 

Asking how we fare. 

Old she grows and after years of strife 
From this sad life departs. 
Still we will find her to the end of life 
The Goddess of our Hearts. 

— E. F. Schick 



Tuesday, May 30, 1944 



The Buff and Blue 



PAGE THKEE 



M 



llllllliUUIIII!!lll!!!!!)i. 



SPORT SLANT 



by Lyle Wiltse 



Hurrah, we're the champions of track in the Mason-Dixon 
League for 194 4, and so three cheers for the Track squad and Coach 
English Sullivan! Sully has been strutting around with a wide ami- 
able grin these days, and who wouldn't after he has coached teams 
that walked off with three trophies for different sports in only two 
years? Quite a record for the Bisons and Gallaudet isi once again in 
the headlines, which should compensate for the ill luck that befell 
us in basketball last season. Oldtimers can now open their morning 
papers and occasionally find such one-inch headlines as, "Gallaudet 
Champs In Mason-l>ixon Track Meet," or "Bisons Top Mason-Dixon 
In Basketball." No doubt such headlines will make the Oldtimers 
probe back into the rusty recesses of their memories to recall the 
good old days of '30-'33. The excellent track team of Catholic Uni- 
versity gave the Bisons the toughest competition and the other teams 
in the conference are to be applauded also for their splendid show- 
ings. 

Coach English Sullivan has been called to the colors by Uncle 
Sam and so won't be seen out on the field or court coaching next 
year. Good coaches are scarce these days and it is our luck that 
we will have all the excellent material for every major sport but 
probably no coach of Sully's mettle. Sully is really happy,... he 
has three pictures of the champion teams hung up on the wall of 
his office, and he'll have a bully time telling the fellows at his Naval 
Training Base in Florida about the games and meets. It was your 
greatest wish as a coach, Sully, to accomplish what you did, and 
we're happy to no end for you, so will be expecting you back after 
this confounded war is over, and in the meantime, . . . lots of luck. 

Two of the finest track men that ever set foot on Hotchkiss 
Field namely, Captaia Berg and Paul Baldridge, will be absent from 
the squad next spring. Captain Berg broke Gallaudet's javelin- 
throwing record in 1943 and displayed his excellent ability again 
this year when he won first place in every meet. Baldridge's field 
events, which were numerous, won for him second place in total 
scoring points for this season, so there goes another valuable man! 
Bob Stanley, fast trackster, overruled him for first place by a margin 
of only a few points. Capt. Berg and Baldridge have shown much 
enthusiasm for their favorite sport ever since they first trod the 
grass of Kendall Green, so fate was indeed very kind to throw the 
championship in our laps during their final year. There is no doubt 
that their one great wish now is for their Alma Mater to keep the 
sport going as strong as ever, to which cause the remaining track- 
sters and new ones to come will, I believe, gladly rally. 



The Intramural Softball Tournament wasn't met with as much 
enthusiasm as was expected it would be, due to the forming of a 
team for downtown league competition. Nevertheless the tourna- 
ment went through as scheduled, with the Diamond Marauders cop- 
ping the championship. Manager Van Cott has high hopes for his 
"A" team which consists of two faculty members and the rest stu- 
dents, playing under the name of Gallaudet, and he hopes to form 
a strong foundation for a future hard-ball team. Such hopes would 
normally be considered absurd, but a good beginning is a task half 
done, and the boys have so far shown considerable improvement. 

T. G. F. 



League Softball 



In a "last ditch" effort to bring 
big-time sports back to Gallaudet, 
Dan Van Cott and Bob Panara, 
both '45, wheedled the D. C. 
Recreational League out of a 
franchise in the Sports Center 
Softball League. 

The team, composed of College 
Students and some of the Faculty 
who are still capable of moving 
swiftly around the diamond, Is 
ready to meet all comers. In the 
league tournament, they play 
Sunday mornings at one of the 
High School Diamonds, and for 
practice games, they meet many 
of the organized teams of the city 
on any diamond which may be 
available. To date, in two league 
games, they have met the F.B.I, 
and the Petworth Bowling 
Alleys, losing the first and win- 
ning the second. In extra-league 
practice they meet such teams as 
the Blue Comets, the R.C.A.F., 
the Foreign Economic Adminis- 



tration and the Mt. Rainier Rec 
reation. 

The team shows some promise 
of coming out in the tournament 
near the upper bracket but it is 
very doubtful that they will lead 
the league. Anyway, the students 
who participate in these games 
are not only doing it for personal 
fame and glory, but also to revive 
the feeling among the students 
here in Gallaudet that sports are 
the most important extra-cur- 
ricular activities We earnestly 
hope that through the efforts of 
these lads, we will soon find base- 
ball back in Gallaudet. 

During the summer vacation, 
the managers intend to make use 
of the boys who plan to work in 
and around Washington. Such 
men as Panara, on third; Hol- 
comb, a short stop (depending); 
Padden, in short field; Van Cott, 
in left field and the batterymates, 
Shrout and Massey make the fre- 
quent games a very interesting 
affair for every baseball fan. So 
come on all ye Alumnus, give 
them your grandstand help during 
the summer. 



BISONS WIN MASON -DIXON TRACK TITLE 



Richards, of Bridgewater 
Betters Pole-vault Record 
From II ft. 6 in. to 12 ft 



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1 GALLAUDET 



PHARMACY! 



Phone Atlantic 8888 | 

1 1000 Flordia Ave., N. E. ■ Washington, D. G. | 
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With a well-balanced and 
powerful team, Gallaudet won 
the Mason-Dixon Conference 
Track and Field Championship 
Meet which was held at Catholic 
University's home grounds May 
6. The final score for the Bisons 
stood at 95% while the top-sided 
host finished second with a 
score of 79% points. Bridge- 
water College of Virginia took 
third place with 28 points, but 
Johns-Hopkins University, de- 
fending champions, wound up at 
the end of the meet with only 21 
points to receive fourth place. 

The traditional spirit that has 
brought Gallaudet many a title 
in the past years and has also 
enabled them to lead all the way 
by placing men in every event 
held. Main stars of the afternoon, 
however were Richards of Bridge- 
water, who finished first in 
the 220-yard low hurdles and 
pole vault, shattering the Con- 
ference mark of 11' 6" for 12', 
and second in the 120 high hur- 
dles and broad jump; and Kings- 
bury of Catholic, who won first 
place in both the high and broad 
jumps and also won several lesser 
places in the field events. Both of 
these stars earned 18 points each. 
Lesser standouts in comparison, 
were Campanella of Catholic and 
Van Cott of Gallaudet, in dashes, 
Stanley of Gallaudet in middle 
distance, and Hines of Gallaudet 
in long distance and Baldridge, 
Berg and Sladek of Gallaudet in 
the hurling events. 

Highlights of the afternoon 
was the 880-yard run in which 
Gallaudet's foremost cinder burn- 
ers came roaring home to place 
men in the first four positions. 
Stanley negotiated the distance 
in near a record time of 2:08, 
followed by Hines, Goodwin and 
Kubis. According to popular opin- 
ion this run was the kind that 
typifies the "Gallaudet Spirit." 

Another credible performance 
was the 4 40-yard dash, won by 
Stanley of Gallaudet who made 
the distance in 53:6. Jameson, of 
Johns Hopkins, a former runner 
for the strong Stonewall Demo- 
cratic Club who had run against 
Gallaudet during the Cross Coun- 
try season, finished second. In 
the field events, aside from 
Richards and Kingsbury, the ver- 
satile musclemen of Gallaudet, 
Baldridge, Berg, and Sladek, 
turned in some incredible feats 
and impressed all the onlookers. 

The final event, the half-mile 
relay, was run in a hard rain 
which had been threatening the 
meet all day, and was won by 
Hopkins. Second, third and four- 
th, was won respectively by, Ca- 
tholic U., Gallaudet College and 
Bridgewater C. 

The event was cause for a 
double celebration for Coach Sul- 
livan as it was his birthday. He 
has been called from the reserve 
list and has left to report for 
active Naval duty. Commissioned 
an Ensign, he will first take his 
training as a deck officer at 
Hollywood, Florida. As a token 
for his past years of faithful 
tulelage and fine leadership, the 
team members presented him 
with a trophy in due recognition. 



Girls' Sport News 

Once again, the honor of being 
swimming champion of the Gal- 
laudet Mermaids goes to Hester 
Parsons. The annual swimming 
meet held in the coed's swimming 
pool April 13 drew many of the 
young women to the pool as con- 
testants and still more came as 
spectators. Judges of the meet 
were Prof. McClure, Prof. Hughes 
and Prof. Kline. Dr. Hall and 
Dean Peet were guests 

Miss Parsons, '47, won the 
championship with a total of 26% 
points. Her twin sister, Frances 
Parsons, '48, was second with a 
total of 16% points. Malvine Fis- 
cher, '44, and Norma Bushey, '47, 
tied for third place with 15 
points each. Placement in various 
divisions were as follows: 
Class Championship — First, Fresh- 
men; second, Preparats; third, 
Seniors. 

American Crawl Race First, 
Frances Parsons, '48; second Hes- 
ter Parsons, '47; third Arlene 
Stecker, '44. 

American Crawl Form First, 
Hester Parsons, '4 7; second Mal- 
vine Fischer, '44; third, tie be- 
tween Virgie Bourgeois, '44, and 
Frances Parsons, '48. 
Back Stroke Race First, Hester 
Parsons, '47; second, Agnes 
Minor, '47; third, tie between 
Clarice Petrick, '44, and Julia 
Burg, '44. .... 

Back Stroke Form First, Malvine 
Fischer, '44; second, Ruth Depew, 
'48; third, Irene Hodock, '48. 
Breast Stroke Race First, Hester 
Parsons, '47; second, Betty Tay- 
lor,, '48; third, Norma Bushey 
'47. 

Breast Stroke Form First, Malvine 
Fischer, '44; second, Norma 
Bushey, '47; third, Virgie Bour- 
geois, '44. 

Sculling Race— First, Norma 
Bushey, '47; second, Hester Par- 
sons, '47; third, Arlene Stecker, 
'44. 

Side Stroke-Form — First, Frances 
Parsons, '48; second and third 
places, tie between Arlene Stecker, 
'44, and Malvine Fischer, '44. 
Diving — First, Hester Parsons, 
'47; second Frances Parsons, '48; 
third, Norma Bushey, '47. 
Surface Diving — First, Norma 
Bushey, '47; second Frances Par- 
sons, '48; third, tie between Ruth 
Depew, '48, and Hester Parsons, 
'47. 

An added attraction to the 
meet was a short skit acted by 
the Parson twins and Ruth Depew, 
which showed two girls fighting 
over one man and how they met 
a tragic end by drowning. 

V 

Badminton 
1st — Linette Freret 
2nd — Norma Bushey 
3rd — Celia Burg 

Archery 

1st — Marjorie Case 

2nd — Margaret Clack 

3rd — tie between Arlene Stecker 

and Clarice Petrick 



'SULLY' 



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Coach English Sullivan 

His victorious headlines will 
cease to grace the sports page. 

(Read article on page 1) 

V 

Intramural Softball 



I wholly disagree with yhat 
you say, but I will defend to my 
death your right to say it. 

— Voltaire 



ART 



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Since 

1885 

MOTH 

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Mrs. Geo. L. Sutton 

Mrs. L. Sutton Bailey 

ATlantic 1153 

PEOPLES 

FLOWER SHOP 

"Say It With Flowers" 

900 H Street, N. E. 



The mild Spring weather has 
brought on, a varying assortment 
of out-of-doors sporting activities 
which has proved to be a success- 
ful as well as an interesting sup- 
plement to the routine college 
schedule. 

Early in the Spring, when young 
man's fancy was almost ready to 
turn to thoughts of love, the men 
students began drafting plans for 
an Intramural Softball program. 
After a regular "bull session" in 
the men's refectory, the following 
teams and managers were select- 
ed: the Ravens, managed by Roy 
Holcomb; the Minute Men, man- 
aged by Henry Krostoski; the Dia- 
mond Marauders, managed by 
Thomas Fishier; the Gas House 
Gang, managed by Robert Panara; 
and the Underdogs, managed by 
Daniel Van Cott. 

A round-robin tournament was 
arranged so that each team would 
have a better than average chance 
to win the Championship. Sport 
fans turned out each afternoon to 
see their favorite team in action. 
It is by popular opinion that we 
mention the Ravens and the Gas 
House Gang as having good teams, 
but regardless of the fixed odds, 
the Diamond Marauders rolled 
triumphantly over their opponents 
to win the crown with four 
straight wins. 
Final Results Of Games: 
TEAM W L 

Diamond Marauders 4 

Ravens 3 1 

Gas House Gang 2 2 

Minute Men 1 3 

Underdogs 4 

V 

Boy's Tennis Tournament 
Champion - L. Mortensen, P. C. 
Runner-Up - E. Shrout, '46 



Jack's Meat Market I 

922 7th St., N. E. 

Fancy Groceries, Fruit And 

Vegetables 

Beer and Wine 

J. Greenstein, Prop. 



THOMPSON'S 
BARBER SHOP 

Orleans Place near Fla. Ave. 
Hair Cut As You Like It 

50 cents 
Hours: 11 to 8 
9 to 9 Saturdays 



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First Run & Revivals £ 
See Daily Papers for Programs = 



Compliments 
Glass of '47 



Noted Sportswriter 
Speaks at Banquet 



Speaking before the young men 
assembled in the men's refectory 
at the G.C.A.A. Banquet on Fri- 
day evening, April 14, Mr. Craig 
E. Taylor, sports writer for The 
Baltimore Sun, delivered an im- 
pressive speech based on the stat- 
us of competitive athletics in the 
post-war world. His talk was ot 
such general interest that it 
seems appropriate to quote the 
main body of his speech below; 

"It is the future of sports and 
athletics after the war, as related 
to daily life within industry and 
the community. It is imperative 
enough to have caused the forma- 
tion of a governmental organiza- 
tion to handle the problem. We 
all like to sit in the stands and 
watch somebody hit a home run 
or gallop to a touchdown. But 
that didn't enable us to be pre- 
pared for war, and it isn't going 
to help us for the strain of the 
reconstruction period that will 
come with peace and victory. We 
kidded ourselves that we were in 
good physical condition, but the 
draft doctors found otherwise. 

The colleges are going to have 
to play an important role in. the 
production of leaders to install 
and operate industrial and civic 
programs. Most of the institu- 
tions of higher education realized 
the need enough to take time from 
accelerated programs to engage 
in mass competitive sports. The 
stress is upon the competitive 
participation by everyone. 

Please notice that mass athle- 
tics alone is not sufficient. This 
is a competitive world, and the 
lessons so far learned show that 
there is no substitute for com- 
petition as is afforded in sport. 
It may be ever so fundamental 
in character, such as running, 
throwing, or kicking a ball for 
distance or something like that, 
but unless the element of com- 
petition enters, the exercise be- 
comes a bore, there is no chance 
to develop sportsmanship, and 
the end results are inferior." 

As he continued with his talk, 
Mr. Taylor described the unique 
pioneering position held by Gal- 
laudet College, and praised the 
work being done by such men 
as Dr. W. P. Jacobs, chairman 
of the Commission on Physical 
Fitness in Industry and presi- 
dent of Presbyterian College; L. 
B. Icely, president of the Wilson 
Sporting Goods Company; Dr. 
Frank Lloyd and George Hols- 
trom, of the Physical Fitness 
Committee; Stewart Paxton, of 
Fairchild Aircraft in Hagerstown; 
Ike Ruth of Glenn L. Martin in 
Baltimore; and John B. Kelly. He 
also stressed the opportunity 
which we, at Gallaudet, will have 
for entering into the manage- 
ment of athletic programs and 
problems in the post-war world. 
Ending his talk, Mr. Taylor stat- 
ed, "You at Gallaudet have an 
opportunity of helping to main- 
tain the spirit of competitive 
athletics in your particular 
sphere, and I'm sure you don't 
intend to miss it." 

V 

There's a language that's mute; 
yet a silence that speaks. 



SHOP NEAR BY 



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Men's and Boys' Wear 



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925 H Street, N. E. 



Phone TRindad 8333 



PAGE FOUK 



The Buff and Blue 



Tuesday, May 30, 1944 



ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT OF DR. CHARLES ELY 
ENDOWMENT FUND 

Reported in Buff and Blue, May 1942 $5,453.03 

1942 

Oct. 1 Interest on Savings Account 4.20 

Wov. 2 5 Interest on Bonds: 
Penna R. R.: 

142.50 

U. S Treasury: 

(2) J1.000 4%% 1981 series ©21.25 

(2) ?1,000 3% 1951-55 series @1500 

30.00 

(2) $100 2%% 1945-47 series @1.37 

2.74 

(1) $500 2%% 1945-47 series @6.87 

6.87 



1943 
Feb. 2 3 
April 1 
July 30 



Oct. 1) 
Nov. 23 



82.11 

Proceeds Mollycoddle Football (Mr. Steinman) 9.10 

Interest on Savings Account 3.19 

Interest on Bonds: 
Penna R. R.: 
(2) $1,000 4%% 1981 series @21.25 

42.50 

U. S. Treasury: 

(2) $1,000 3% 1951-55 series @15.00 

30.00 

(2) $100 2%% 1945-47 series @1.38 

2.76 

(1) $500 2%% 1945-47 series @6.88 

R.Jt'* 

82.14 

Interest on Savings Account 2.17 

Interest on Bonds: 
Penna R. R.: 

(2) $1,000 4%% 1981 series @21.25 

42.50 

U. S. Treasury: 

(2) $1,000 3% 1951-55 series ©15.00 

30.00 

(2) $100 2%% 1945-47 series ©1.37 

2.74 

(1) $500 2%% 1945-47 series ©6.87 

6.87 



82.11 

1944 
Jan. 6 Proceeds Mollycoddle Football and Soccer 

Games (per Mr. Marshall) 12.90 

April 1 Interest on Savings Account 2.49 

1944 
April 8 Interest on Bonds: 
Penna. R. R. : 

(2) $1,000 4Vt% 1981 series ©21.25 

42.50 

U. S. Treasury: 

(2) $1,000 3% 1951-55 series ©15.00 

30.00 

(2) $100 2%% 1945-47 series ©1.38 

2.76 

(1)$500 2%% 1945-47 series ©6.88 

6.88 

82.14 

Total $5,815.58 

Less Rental on Safety Box . . 3.60 

Grand Total $5,811.98 

Cash and Security (at cost 

May 12, 1943 Through W. B. Hibbs & Co. purchased 

(2) $1,000 iYi% Penna. R. R. Gen. (1981) 

(1) Principal $1,028.75 

Accrued Interest 4.49 

Service Charge & Postage 3.85 

(1) Principal 1,027.50 

Accrued Interest 4.49 

Service Charge & Postage .... 4.00 



$2,073.08 

Cash and Securities on April 8, 1944: 

(2) $1,000 3% U. S. Treas. 1951-55 series 2,043.75 

(2) $100 2%% U. S. Treas. 1945-47 series 191.40 

(1) $500 2%% U. S. Treas 1945-47 series 518.82 

Deposited with American Security & Trust Co.: 

Balance in Saving Account 620.39 

Balance in Checking Acount 364.54 

Grand Total $5,811.98 



William J. McClure, Treasurer 



J!^ilinilllllllllll[]llllllllllll[3IIIIIIIIIIIIE]IIIIIIIIIIIIC3IIIIIIIIIIIIE]lllllllllllinillllllllll!^: _ 



• • 



.»♦»»♦♦♦♦ 



♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



NEWS OF THE ALUMNI 



By Winfield S. Rumle, '01 



♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦ < of '44 measure up to these sam- 
ples all the old timers will have 
to move over to a back seat some 
time in June shortly after they 
graduate. 



♦ ♦■»♦«»♦■ » ■♦♦ 



♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦» 



■»♦♦<! 



f am&Ll 




James R. Kirkley, N-'37, is 
Principal of the West Virginia 
School. We have it from one of 
his teachers that he is "doing a 
wonderful job and has the deep- 
est understanding of the deaf." 
Such a pedagogue is a valuable 
asset to a school, and he is given 
and deserve* the loyal support of 
all who worK with him. It takes 
from ten to fifteen years to round 
out a goou ccacher of the deaf, 
but often the gifted take hold in 
a much shorter time. In that case 
it is a fortunate break for the 
deaf children because little or 
no time is lost getting down to 
a proper understanding of their 
individual abilities. 

V 

Laura Knight Schowe, Jr., '42, 
has re-embarked on her career as 
a librarian, which science she 
learned at Gallaudet, and is an 
assistant librarian in charge of 
periodicals at the Battelle Me- 
morial Institute Library in Co- 
lumbus. The institution is a pri- 
vately endowed business and 
scientific research organization. 
Ben, '42, you all know, is teach- 
ing in the same city. 

V . 

The Alumni Editor is Indebted 
to Ben M. Schowe, '18, for the 
following items about graduates 
and former students living 
around Akron. Ben is a hustler, 
as we have said before, and he is 
greatly in demand as a lecturer 
because he possesses a clear cut 
mastery of the sign language. He 
is in short a straight from the 
shoulder speaker. The items, he 
sent in are neatly typed and are 
herewith copied as written. 

Responsibilities of the most 
serious nature furrow the brow 
of Robert Lankenau, '42, these 
strenuous days of war. Not only 
is he a husband and father, but 
also a householder. In his spare 
moments between tending the 
baby and spading the garden, he 
performs as a chemist at the Fire- 
stone plants in Akron. Anyone 
who has tried anything of this 
sort will understand that Lanky 
is a very busy young man. Nora, 
the newest Lankenau, is a charm- 
ing miss of some three odd months 
as this is written and already she 



has everything about the house 
very well in hand. Lanky never 
steps out without her permission. 
It is a pleasant home and a happy 
family. 

Jack Zack Falcon and Arnold 
Daulton, both of the vintage of 
'43, stepped up and laid their ten 
dollars on the line for life mem- 
berships in the G. C. A. A. not 
long ago. Jack Zack (you can 
sing that name) is another young 
Firestone chemist who is well 
launched on a career. Daulton 
has been kept busy with war 
work at the Goodyear Akron 
plant so far and it is a little hard 
to say just what direction he 
may take in the future. Hasn't 
got definitely settled yet. 

Akron is the town with so 
many alumni meetings that they 
can't find time to hold an alumni 
meeting. The O.W.L.S. meet reg- 
ularly, the Class of 1916 has been 
having meetings for longer than 
they like to remember and it re- 
cently got out that the Class of 
1944 already was holding month- 
ly sessions in this man's town — 
believe it or not. Easy Carney, 
Ray Butler and Moon Mullins, all 
former members of the '44 Class 
who have acquired wives so beau- 
tiful that your eye can't believe 
it, get together for a class din- 
ner once a month. Mrs. Carney 
is the former Ruth Aldrich ex- 
'46, of Minn. Mrs. Ray Butler is 
the former Helen Evans of Okla- 
homa, and Mrs. Mullins decorated 
the Class of '46, under the name 
of Rosemary Denham. She regis- 
tered from Indiana. It would do 
you no good to try to get an in- 
vitation to one of these dinners. 
The three young wives are de- 
voted to their own husbands. 
V 

However, the three represent 
atives of the Class of '44 in 
Akron have much more than their 
wives to boast about. Brother 
Moon Mullins is president of Ak- 
ron Division No. 45 N.F.S.D. 
Ray Butler is president of the 
Akron Club for the Deaf with 
clubrooms that run over three 
floors of a large downtown build- 
ing. Easy Carney is Secretary of 
the Club. If the rest of the Class 



STUDIO 



Photographers of the 1943 Buff and Blue 



1305 Conn. Avenue, N. W. 



DEcatur 1833 



MET. 

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Woodward & Lothrop 

11 & F St., N. W. 






Count on each of them for many happy returns 
on the price you pay. One skirt plus three 
blouses or sweaters cab equal three costumes — 
and Woodward & Lothrop has the sort of 
separate skirts your favorite blouses need . . . 
casual affairs. . . . tailorer skirts — ■ afternoon 
skirts, with dressmaker detail. Team them 

with separate jackets and seem to have a host 
of suits. Only you will ever know how lar^e 
a share in your change-about wardrobe a single 
separate skirt plays. Choose yours on misses' 
sizes from our collection of sportswear. 



Freshman Dinner 
Honors Mrs. Fisher 



The members of the Freshman 
Class entertained Mr. and Mrs. 
Howard Fisher at a dinner at the 
Dodge Hotel on the evening of 
May 22, to express their thanks 
to Mrs. Fisher for her volunteer 
work in instructing the Fresh- 
man Class in Art Appreciation. 
Mrs. Fisher accepted the posi- 
tion without remuneration due 
to a vacancy in that position 
caused by the resignation of Miss 
Margaret Yoder (now Mrs. Doug- 
las Keys). 

The menu was as follows: Fruit 
cup, fried chicken, mashed pota- 
toes, creamed peas, green salad, 
ice cream, cake and coffee. 

A gift was presented to Mrs. 
Fisher at the dinner in apprecia- 
tion of her work. Both the boys 
and girls in the Freshman Class 
hope that in the future the Art 
Appreciation classes will be as 
fortunate as they were to have 
Mrs. Fisher as their instructor 
this year. 

V 

G.CW.AA Banquet 



(Continued from page 1) 
Burg, '45. Bowling, first place, 
Mary Sladek, '44; second place, 
Frances Todd, '44; third, tie be- 
tween Norma Bushey, '47 and 
Linette Freret, '47. Last but not 
least, Dr. Hall presented the 
Senior award to Julia Burg for 
all around sports ability and 
sportsmanship interest and good 
attitude. Mary Sladek, '44 then 
rendered "The Star - Spangled 
Banner." 

The gay evening was Drought 
to a close by the presentation of 
a beautiful carving set from the 
girl students to Mrs. Temple for 
her long and courageous serv- 
ice as girls' Physical Director and 
Domestic Science Instructor. Mrs. 
Temple is leaving her position 
with the close of college. 



Foreign Students 
Guests At Play 

Twenty members of the Wash- 
ington Student International Club 
were guests of Dr. Powrie Doc- 
tor, Saturday evening, May 6, at 
the presentation of "The Pirates 
of Penzance" in Chapel Hall. 
About fifteen Nationalities were 
represented including students 
from Iceland, Sweden, Russia, 
France, Czechoslovakia, China, 
Canada and Mexico. 

It was the first occasion for 
most of the students to witness 
the use of the sign language and 
the manual alphabet. All were 
greatly impressed by the grace- 
fulness of signs as exemplified by 
the actors. The foreign students 
were greatly Interested in the 
fact that Gallaudet was the only 
college for the deaf in the world. 
They were quite impressed by 
the collegiate appearance of the 
students and expressed the opin- 
ion that they could see very little 
difference between the students 
here and those in other American 
colleges they had visited. They 
also thought the play was super- 
ior to many college dramatic pro- 
ductions they had seen. 

Three normal students from 
Gallaudet College have been 
members of this club: Miss Eliza- 
beth Cutler of Canada, Mrs. Eu- 
nice Leong Chop of Hawaii and 
Dr. Natesh of India. 



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FELDMAN'S 

Tho Store For Distinctive Jewelry 

Watches Diamonds Silverware 

( Repairing of All Kinds) 



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Stationery Gifts 
Photo- Work 
651 H St., N. B. 



1 



Dr. Bjorlee Elected 
To Board 



Dr. Ulysses G. B. Pierce, for 
many years a member of the 
Board of Directors of the Colum- 
bia Institution for the Deaf, and 
in recent years its Secretary, died 
suddenly last fall of a heart at- 
tack. Dr. Pierce was widely 
known both as a minister and as 
a philanthropist. 

The vacancy on the board 
caused by his death was filled at 
the regular spring meeting called 
April 18, by the appointment of 
Dr. Ignatius Bjorlee, L. L. D., 
L. H. D., Superintendent of the 
Maryland School for the Deaf for 
over twenty-five years. 

Dr. Bjorlee has been President 
of the Convention of American 
Instructors of the Deaf. He is 
now Editor of the American An- 
nals of the Deaf, and chairman 
of the executive committee of the 
Conference of Executive of Amer- 
ican Schools for the Deaf. 

He is a graduate of Sr. Olaf 
College which conferred on him 
the honorary degree of Doctor of 
Laws. He was graduated from the 
Normal Department of Gallaudet 
College in 1910. 

On commencement day last 
year, Dr. Bjorlee received from 
Gallaudet College the honorary 
degree of Doctor of Humane Let- 
ters. 

V 

Seniors' Concert 



As their last group presentation 
and the last class concert of the 
year, the Senior Class of 1944 
chose as their theme Mother's 
Day at the Sunday evening Cha- 
pel Service May 14. 

After Prof. H. D. Drake read 
financial reports of the years con- 
cert proceedings to the Communi- 
ty Chest, the farewell program 
was introduced by Thomas Berg 
with a talk on the origin of Mo- 
ther's Day. A reading from the 
Bible, Kings, Chapter three, was 
deftly presented by Miss Caroline 
Tillinghast. Favorite poems, 
"Which Loved Her Best," and 
"My Mother," were ably present- 
ed by Frances Lupo and Leander 
Moore. The amusing "M other 
Makes a Mustard Plaster" by 
Clarence Day was graphically re- 
viewed by Paul Baldridge, and 
"Which Hat" was reviewed by 
Arlene Stecker. The program 
came to an end with a prayer by 
Virgie Bourgeois. 

Praise is deserving of the Sen- 
iors who rendered the program 
for the extraordinary grace and 
precise arrangements with which 
it was carried out. 

V 

Y.W.CA. Lawn Party 

(Continued from page 1) 
On the receiving line were 
Frances Lupo, current president 
of the Y.W.C.A., and Clarhelen 
Wilkins, newly elected president 
for next year. Acknowledgement 
is extended to the officers of the 
organization and to the guests 
who helped to make the party an 
enjoyable event. 

V 

Dramatics Class Play 

(Continued from page 1) 
give up his loot. The curtain rings 
down over Harold's words, "1 
can do it!" 

Prof. Hughes and the Drama- 
tics Class are to be congratulated 
for their untiring efforts to make 
the entire program a success. 
Credit must also be extended to 
the men and women behind the 
scenes who were: Assistants Julia 
Burg, Frances Lupo, Mary Sla- 
dek; Mrs. Lorraine F. Kline, In- 
terpreter; James Drake, Stage 
Design; Herman Johnson, stage 
assisant; and the Freshman 
Class in Business Practice, Mim- 
eographers. 



When you think you're green — 
you grow but when you think 
you're ripe — you decay. 



\'~ 



Compliments 
of the 

Curb Cafe 

714 H. St., N. E.